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GENEALOGICAL NOTES AND ANECDOTES

   

ANTECEDENTS and DESCENDANTS
of
THOMAS HARRINGTON, SR.
(ABT 1690 - BY 11 February 1744/45)

   
   

G0500A: Thomas HARRINGTON [010]
Birth: 1625, Virginia, British North America
Death: <1713>, North Carolina, British North America
Father: Unknown HARRINGTON (1594, England - 1653, Northampton County, Virginia, British North America)
Mother: Unknown UNKNOWN

Marriage: 1646, <North Carolina>, British North America
Spouse: Anna UNKNOWN

Child 1: John HARRINGTON (1653, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - 1741, <Chowan County>, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Ann MAJOUR

Child 2: Humphrey HARRINGTON (1658, Virginia, British North America - 1712, Perquimans County, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Elizabeth MAJOUR

Child 3: William HARRINGTON (1660, Virginia, British North America - ?) [M]

Child 4: George HARRINGTON (1662, Virginia, British North America - ?) [M]

Note 1: It is often thought, on the basis of a mistranscription of the Will of Edward HARRINGTON, who died in Northampton County, Virginia previous to 3 January 1653, that Thomas HARRINGTON was the son of Edward HARRINGTON and had siblings named Bill and Mary.

Edward HARRINGTON appears to have landed in Virginia on 1 August 1643, disembarking from the ship of Capt. Samuel Matthews (1 February 1582/83, Yorkshire, England - 3 March 1659/60, Matthews Manor, Virginia, British North America), the royal governor. In 1651, Edward HARRINGTON signed the "Faith To England" with Francis Flood, John Coulson, Richard Hill, Samuel Jones, Thomas Savage and William Luddington.

The Will of Edward HARRINGTON is reproduced as follows:

The body of the Will may be transcribed as follows:

  In a county court holden att Northampton the 3rd of January Anno 1653

In the name of God Amen I Edward HARRINGTON being sicke in body; yet in p<er>fect sense & memorye, doo make this my last Will & Testament in manner and form following

I bequeath my soule to God that gave it, & my body to the earth to bee burryed; Item I give unto Thomas BELLs his youngest sonne Towe (= two) hundred Acr. of land att the seaboard side, Adioyneinge (= adjoining) to a creeke called by the name of Phillippe Creeke; alsoe one younge cowe called by the name of Coale; Item one younge cowe called by the name of Browne, with a Bull calfe; Item I give unto Mary BELL, wife to Tho BELL, one cowe called by the name of Goodman; I give unto the boye Dan'll Shettltwood one calfe with a white face: Item I give unto Thomas BELL one hundred and ffifty Acr. of land lyeing att the seaboard side & all my whole Estate, undisposed of, unto the aforem<entione>d Tho BELL, hee payeing all my debte & legacy and he seeing me decently buryed, whom I doe make whole Executor of this my last Will & Testament.

Edward HARRINGTON

Witness Edward Moore, Richard Saywell, Robert Berry, John Tilney

Memorand that this third of January 1653 this will was proved in open court by the corporal oathe of the witnesses

Teste:   Edm. Mathews Clk. Cur.

It is likely that Mary BELL was the daughter of Edward HARRINGTON. A son of Thomas and Mary BELL appears to have been Robert BELL (Sr.) (BEF 1678 - 1725, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America) who married Mary CUTTING, the daughter of William CUTTING. Their children were: Thomas BELL (? - 1768, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m. Mary WATSON (BY 1709 - BY 1768); William BELL (? - 1744, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m. Elizabeth POWELL (? - 1774); Nathaniel BELL (3 October 1689 - 19 December 1745, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America: interment at Old Bell Plot, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m.Mary Scarbrough WEST (18 December 1691 - 27 May 176?, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America: interment at Old Bell Plot, Accomack County, Virginia, British North America), 19 December 1745; and Robert BELL (Jr.) (? - 28 January 1709/10, Northampton County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m. Tabitha SCARBROUGH (? - 1714).

Note 2: From North Carolina Wills, pp. 226 - 227 [North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register, p. 58]:

  Will of Humphrey HARRINGTON, filed 3 November 1713, Perquimans Precinct, North Carolina

In Ye Name of God Amen, ye Second Day of November in ye year of our Lord, 1713. I, Humphrey Harrington of North Carolina, in perquomons Precinct, Black Smith, being very sick & weak in body, but of perfect mind & memory thanks be Given to God therefore, calling to mind ye mortality of my Body & knowing it is appointed for men once to dye, doe make & ordain this my last will & Testament, that is to say principally & first of all; I Give and recommend my Soul into ye hands of God that gave it, hopeing through ye Merits, Death & passion of my Saviour Jesus Christ To have full & free pardon & forgiveness of all my sins, & to inherit Everlasting life; And my body I commit to ye Earth, to be decently buried at ye discretion of my Executrix herafter named, nothing doubting but at ye Genll. resurrection I Shall receive ye same again by ye mighty power of God; & as touching such worldly Estate as it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life, I demise & dispose of ye same in ye following manner & forme, that is to say: I will that all those debts & duties as I doe ove in right or Conscience, To any manner of person, or persons, whatsoever shall be well & truely contented & paid, or ordained to be paid, in Convenient time after my decease, by my Executrix hereafter named. I Give & bequeith unto my daughter, Ann, my Plantation that I now live on, with one hundred and twenty of land, & to ye heirs of Body lawfully begotten, & She to be posesed at ye age of Sixteen years. I Give & bequeith Unto my daughter in Law, Ann MAJOUR one hundred & twenty acres Joyning to ye aforesd. Plantation of a Tract of land of 340 Acres, & to ye heirs of her body lawfully begotten. I give unto Elizabeth MAJOR, whom I have taken to be my wife, whom I likewise Constitute, make & ordaine my onely & Sole Executrix of this my last will & Testamt., by her freely to be posses'd & enjoyed, & I doe hereby utterly disalloow, Revoke & disannul all & every other Testaments, will & legaces beqts. & Exts. by me in any ways before this time named, willed & bequeithed,
Ratifying & Confirming this & noe other to be my last will & Testament.

in witness whereof, I have herunto Set my hand & Seal, y Day & ye year above written. Humphrey HARRINGTON. Signed, Sealed, published, Pronounced & declared bye ds. Humphrery HARRINGTON, as his last will & Testament in ye presents of ye Subscribers, Vizt: Richard Morris Francis P. Thomas.
Recorded in will book 2, page 18.

Ann MAJOUR, named as "daughter in law," would appear to have been the stepdaughter of Humphrey HARRINGTON.

   

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G0499A: John HARRINGTON [009]
Birth: 1653, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America
Death: 1741, <Chowan County>, North Carolina, British North America
Father: Thomas HARRINGTON (1625, Virginia, British North America - <1713>, North Carolina, British North America)
Mother: Anna UNKNOWN

Marriage: 1685, Virginia, British North America
Spouse: Ann MAJOUR

Child 1: Thomas HARRINGTON (Sr.) (ABT 1690, Chowan [later, Bertie] County, North Carolina, British North America - BY 11 February 1744/45, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Mary WHITMELL (ABT 1690, <Charles City County>, Virginia, British North America - 1743, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America), 1715, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America [See G0498A: Mary WHITMELL, in Descendants of Thomas Whitmell I (BY 1666 - BY 4 December 1693).]

Child 2: William HARRINGTON (1692, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 1723) [M]

Child 3: Charles HARRINGTON (1695 - 1745, Surry County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m. Sarah MASON

Note 1: In 1675 John HARRINGTON purchased land in Surry County, Virginia. In 1687, John HARRINGTON was in the Surry County Militia. In 1693, John HARRINGTON received a land grant in Surry County, Virginia. In 1694, John HARRINGTON was listed as a tithable in urry County, Virginia. In 1694, John HARRINGTON sold property in Surry County, Virginia. [Book 1, Virginia Archives] In 1719, John HARRINGTON received a grant of land in Chowan County, North Carolina.

Note 2: William HARRINGTON, in 1723, served as juryman for Bertie County, North Carolina. [Colonial Records of North Carolina, vol. XXV, p. 189]

Note 3: Charles HARRINGTON is thought to have been living in Craven County, North Carolina in 1738.

   

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G0498A: Thomas HARRINGTON (Sr.) [008]
Birth: ABT 1690, Chowan [later, Bertie] County, North Carolina, British North America
Death: BY 11 February 1744/45, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America
Father: John HARRINGTON (1653, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - 1741, <Chowan County>, North Carolina, British North America)
Mother: Ann MAJOUR

Marriage: 1715, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America
Spouse: Mary WHITMELL (ABT 1690, <Charles City County>, Virginia, British North America - 1743, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America) [See G0498A: Mary WHITMELL, in Descendants of Thomas Whitmell I (BY 1666 - BY 4 December 1693).]

Child 1: Whitmell HARRINGTON (ABT 1717, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - AFT 9 January 1745 and BEF 28 August 1746, St. George's Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Jennet SHAW (8 May 1724, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America - 28 August 1746, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America), 2 February 1741, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America

Child 2: Thomas HARRINGTON (Jr.) (1716, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - BEF 23 November 1787, Halifax County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Hannah HAYNIE, 1735

Child 3: John HARRINGTON (ABT 1719, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - 25 March 1748, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Mary ROGERS (ABT 1721, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 17 October 1750, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America), ABT 1739 , North Carolina, British North America

Child 4: Charles HARRINGTON (ABT 1721, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - 1772, Chatham County, North Carolina, British North America) [M ]: m. Agnes HILL (1728, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - 1797, Chatham County, North Carolina), 1745, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, British North America

Child 5: William HARRINGTON (ABT 1725, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - ?) [M]: m. Unknown UNKNOWN

Child 6: Drury HARRINGTON (1726, <Surry County>, Virginia, British North America - 29 October 1785, Halifax County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Luraina Mary HILL (1728, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - ?), 1747

Note 1: About Mary WHITMELL, the wife of Thomas HARRINGTON, see Harnett County Heritage Committee, The Heritage of Harnett County North Carolina: Feb. 7, 1855, (18 May 1993) volume 1, p. 205.

Note 2: Thomas HARRINGTON (Sr.) : On 2 February 1728, Thomas HARRINGTON, the husband of Mary WHITMELL, obtained 300 acres of land in Edgecomb County, North Carolina. On 8 May 1730, Thomas HARRINGTON purchased land in Bertie County, North Carolina. [p. 101, Index p. 361, Deed Book C]. He sold this land in 1736 to James Parham. In August 1733, Thomas HARRINGTON and his wife Mary sold land in Edgecombe County to Joseph Bradley for 60. [Edgecombe Precinct 1732-1758: Abstract of Deeds, vol. 5, p. 242]

Note 3: Abstracts of Deeds Northhampton County, North Carolina. p.180: 11 February 1744/45 - Mary HARRINGTON and Drury HARRINGTON (county not identified) Executors of Thomas HARRINGTON, deceased, to Mary NORTON of Northhampton County, 3 cash previously paid to Thos HARRINGTON deceased by John HILL, father of the said Mary. 100 acres on Arthur Creek, part of 200 . . .

Note 4: South Carolina Marriages: South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol 5, # 3 (1675-1858):

  SHAW, Jennet and HARRINGTON, Whitmill Feb 02 1741 Prince Frederick Parish

WILSON, William HARRINGTON and Janet Mrs Mar 17 1747

Note 5: Abstracts of the Wills of South Carolina 1740-1760: Vol. MM, pp. 55-56:

  HARRENTON, Whitmel - dated 9 January 1745, probated 28 August 1746, His mark, St. George's Parish, Craven County in Winyah, Planter Wife: Jannet Daughters: Mary and Jannett, under 12 years Brother: Thomas HARENTON, executors: wife; brother Thomas HARRENTON; Witnesses: Robert Oliver, Gershom Lewis [NOTE: This is Whitmel born about 1717 son of Thomas and Mary Whitmel HARRINGTON. Wife's name was Jannet SHAW. Register Book, Parish Prince Frederick, Winyaw, South Carolina records birth dates and baptismal dates and parentage of children.] [NOTE: The Parish of Prince Frederick was organized in 1734 from Craven, Prince George's Winyah Parish, which had been formed 1682 from colonial lands.]

Note 6: Thomas HARRINGTON (Jr.): Deeds of Anson County, Volume A, pp. 71-72: 16 July 1751, Thomas HARRINGTON of Anson County, planter, to Samuel HOUGH of same, planter, for 40 proclamation money . . . land on north side of Great Pee Dee above mouth of dry creek . . . Jacob COLLSON’s line . . . 320 acres . . . granted to James BENTLEY 26 Nov 1746, and sold to said HARRINGTON 26 Apr 1748 . . . Thomas HARRINGTON (T) (SEAL). Witnesses: Joseph TOOPS, John PHILLIPS, Charles ROBINSON Junr.

  Deed Records of Chatham County, North Carolina:

Deed - 23 November 1787-Know all men by these presents that I, Drewry HARRINGTON, of the State of South Carolina, Lancaster County, son of Thomas HARRINGTON deceased of Halifax County, North Carolina, for and in consideration of the sum of 60 current money to him in hand paid by Zachariah Harman all that my part or share of all the personal Estate of the late Drewery HARRINGTON deceased of Halifax County, North Carolina of which I am intitled to as Heir at Law or otherwise likewise all the part and share of John Ashley of Winton County, South Carolina in the right of his wife Sarah Whitmel ASHLEY, formerly Sarah Whitmel HARRINGTON the daughter of Said Thomas HARRINGTON, deceased, of which the said John ASHLEY is intitled to as Heir at Law or otherwise in right of his said wife Sarah WHITMELL ASHLEY. Wit: Philimon (x) HARRINGTON, Drewry (X) HARRINGTON, John Harman. [NOTE: The Thomas HARRINGTON, deceased, referred to in this deed was the one born about 1716 in Anson County, North Carolina, and died before 23 November 1787. He was the son of Thomas and Mary Whitmell HARRINGTON. This Thomas was the one who married Hannah HAYNIE. The Drewery HARRINGTON, deceased, of Halifax County, North Carolina, was the one born about 1722 and died 29 October 1785 Halifax County, North Carolina, who married Lewrania HILL and died without issue. This Drury was the brother of the Thomas above, born 1716, and also son of Thomas and Mary Whitmel HARRINGTON.]

Deed - 23 Nov 1787-Know all men by these presents that I James HUTCHENS of the State of North Carolina, Richmond County, am the son of James HUTCHENS and Mary HUTCHENS his wife who are both deceased. My mother Mary HUTCHENS was daughter of Thomas HARRINGTON, deceased, who was brother to Drewry HARRINGTON, deceased, of Halafax County, State aforesaid -hath bargained sold assigned and set over unto the said Zachariah Harmon -- all that part or share of the Estate of said Drury HARRINGTON, deceased, of Halafax County, North Carolina of which James HUTCHENS my father above mentioned in right of his said wife Mary HUTCHENS would have been intitled to as Heir at Law or otherwise was he the said James HUTCHENS now living to the proper use and behoof of him said Zachariah Harmon. Wit: Philamon (x) HARRINGTON, James (X) HUTCHENS

Power of Attorney - 23 November 1787-Know all men by these presents that I, James HUTCHENS, of Richmond County, State of North Carolina, do by these presents constitute and appoint Zaca. Harman of the County of Chatham state aforesaid my true and lawful attorney to ask demand sue for recovery and receive all that part and share of the personal estate of Drury HARRINGTON deceased of Halafax County, State aforesaid of which my Father James HUTCHENS would have been in titled too in right of his wife Mary HUTCHENS formerly Mary HARRINGTON and Acquittances and other discharges to give and in all things for my said attorney to Act and do as if myself were there present. Given under my hand and seal this 23rd day of November 1787. Wit: Philamon (x) HARRINGTON, John Harmon, James (x) HUTCHENS

Thomas HARRINGTON (Jr.) and Hannah HAYNIE resided between Burn Coat Swamp and Jacket Swamp by Tar and Roanoke Rivers in the part of Bertie County that became Edgecombe County in 1732 and Halifax County in 1741. In 1751, they were in Anson County. Their children were: Mary HARRINGTON (15 July 1736, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America - BEF 23 November 1787) [F]: m. James HUTCHENS; Sarah Whitmell HARRINGTON (21 October 1731, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America -?) [F]: John ASHLEY; Thomas HARRINGTON III (24 March 1741, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America - AFT 1806, Franklin County, Georgia) [M]: m. Sarah UNKNOWN; Hannah HARRINGTON (22 September 1745, Prince Frederick Parish, Craven County in Winyah, South Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Col. Elijah CLARKE; Drury Knight HARRINGTON (ABT 1747, South Carolina, British North America - <1813, Lincoln County, Georgia>) [M]: m. Elizabeth <HUDSON>

  Elijah CLARKE, the husband of Hannah HARRINGTON: (Biographical Sketch) CLARKE, ELIJAH (1733-Jan. 15, 1799), Revolutionary soldier, adventurer, was born in Edgecombe County, South Carolina. He was probably of Scotch-Irish origin, and had the characteristics of a pioneer; he was strong and active, brave and resolute, uneducated, but a leader in stirring times. In 1774 he had removed to Wilkes County, Georgia, and when the war shifted to the South, he became one of the leading partisan commanders. He was colonel of militia, serving at times under Pickens, and was brigadier-general in 178I-83. His name occurs in various skirmishes of the far South, at Alligator Creek in 1778 where he was wounded; at Kettle Creek in 1779, where he shared with Pickens the credit of the victory, displaying foresight in occupying the higher ground; at Musgrove's Mill in August 1780, where he was severely wounded and had a narrow escape; at Fish Dam and Blackstocks in October 1780; at Long Cane, where he was again wounded; and at Beattie's Mill, where he defeated the British leader Dunlap. He served at both sieges of Augusta--in September 1780 when he was repulsed, and the next year when he cooperated with Pickens and Lee in the reduction of the town. In recognition of his services Wilkes County and the legislature of Georgia granted him an estate. After the war CLARKE by turns negotiated with the Indians and fought against them, inflicting a defeat at Jack's Creek, Walton County, Georgia, in 1787. In 1793 he became involved in the schemes of Ghent, the intriguing minister of France, directed against Spain. CLARKE entered the French service and received a commission as major-general, a salary of $10,000, and some means for the carrying out of the plans. It was his part to enlist Georgians, Creeks, and Cherokees, but there was little fighting, Ghent was soon recalled, and Fauchet his successor stopped the undertaking. The next year CLARKE was implicated in a still more serious affair. He led a force into Creek territory across the Oconee River. His motives, according to a biographer, were "not quite clear." But the Georgians were "land-hungry"; they were irritated with the Creeks and with the attitude of the Federal government, and CLARKE claimed to be defending the rights of his state. A few forts were erected, and some towns were laid out. These proceedings brought him to the notice of the law, but he was popular with Georgians, and was acquitted by a Wilkes County tribunal. He continued his project, and the "Trans-Oconee State" received a constitution and a committee of safety. The Federal government, through a letter from Hamilton to the governor of Georgia, then made representations. A blockade along the Oconee was established by Georgia troops, and CLARKE, deserted by most of his followers, surrendered. At a time subsequent to 1794 he was accused (probably without foundation) of scheming, with British encouragement, against Florida. He was also charged with complicity in the Yazoo land frauds. His general reputation in the state did not suffer, however, in consequence of these events. On his death, Wilkes County, the commander of militia issued a general order for mourning. A county in the state bears his name, and a monument at Athens stands in his honor. He was married to Hannah Arrington and was the father of John Clark. [From The Dictionary of American Biography]
   
  ELIJAH CLARKE: Elijah CLARKE was one of the heroes of the Revolution. He was born in North Carolina probably in 1733, and when about forty years of age came with his family to Georgia and settled in Wilkes County. Several other families came at the same time, bringing their cattle and horses with them, and such household furniture as they could easily transport in wagon and carts.

The pioneers' homes were on the wild frontier, with the villages of the Indians not far away, from which the restless savages, already stirred up by British and Tories, threatened at any time to descend upon the settlements of the whites. CLARKE and his neighbors in Wilkes County had to be on their guard constantly to defend their lives and protect their property. CLARKE was a leader in the neighbor. His spirit was boldand fearless, his mind was alert, and he had no love for the British and Tories.

There were few schools in those days, and the frontiersmen knew little of books. They knew much of the forest, and were learned in the craft of the pioneer. CLARKE, like many another, had to battle with the wilderness and had to meet the stern duties of life on the frontier. He became a bold fighter, and relentless pursuer of the enemies of his country. It was said that the women always asked, "Is CLARKE going to lead the fight?" If the answer was Yes, they felt safe. When in battle, he became so earnest and so reckless, and fought so fearlessly in hand-to-hand conflict, that his own soldiers would stop to watch him fight. He was so self-willed and confident that he found it hard to be obedient to authority. A story is told of him that he once prosecuted a man for stealing a horse. The jury decided the man was not guilty, but CLARKE was convinced otherwise, and said, "If the jury will not hang him, I will." He was about to take the man and hang him to a tree himself, but others interfered and persuaded CLARKE to let the man go.

When CLARKE heard that a little army was gathering at Savannah to oppose the British, he offered his services and was appointed captain of a company to guard some wagons loaded with prisoners. On the way to Savannah, and while crossing a small stream, they were attacked by Indians, but after a severe conflict the savages were driven away. CLARKE and his troops went with General Howe on the expedition against St. Augustine. In a battle with the British he was badly wounded, and for a long time was unable to be with his command. He went to his home in Wilkes County, where he recovered from his wounds, and was soon in the field gathering men to fight Colonel Boyd, a noted Tories, at Kettle Creek.

For a time, Georgia was completely in the hands of the British. Mounted soldiers secured the country above Augusta and out towards Wilkes County. Whenever the few inhabitants that were left refused to take the oath of allegiance, their homes, barns, and grain were burned. The torch was likewise applied to the homes of those who were absent in the army or had fled to Carolina for safety.

The band of patriots that had been assembled under John Dooly, Andrew Pickens, and Elijah CLARKE, watched the movements of the enemy as best they could. The Tory Colonel Boyd, led a band of eight hundred marauders from the Carolinas into upper Georgia. He was bent on destroying property, stealing horses, and terrifying the people. His march was a path of destruction by fire and sword. When he entered Georgia, the patriots followed and overtook him in Wilkes County.

Boyd seemed unconscious of the approach of the Americans, and in the early morning of February 14, 1779, had halted at a farm on Kettle Creek and turned his horse out to forage on the grass and weeds along the edge of a swamp. His men had been on short rations for three days, and were killing some cattle and parching corn. The Americans advanced to the attack. Boyd hastily gathered his men into line of battle, and posted them behind some fallen timber and a fence.

Boyd fought with much bravery, but was overpowered and driven back. While retreating, he fell, mortally wounded, pierced by three balls. The Americans rushed upon the British, driving them into the swamp and capturing their horses, baggage, and arms. The defeat was complete. The Tories scattered in every direction after the death of their leader, some going into Florida, some fleeing to the Indians, and others finding their way to Augusta

While CLARKE was in the field fighting the wandering hands of British and Tories, his own home was left unprotected. One day a party of these marauders came to his house and finding out to whom it belonged, burned it to the ground, with all the furniture it contained, leaving his wife and children to find what shelter they could. Upon another occasion his wife, who was riding a horse in search of her husband near the North Carolina line, was stopped by a party of British, and made to dismount and pursue her journey on foot, while they made off with the horse. This made CLARKE still more determined to rid his country of its enemies. With a little band of patriots, sometimes several hundred and then again a mere handful, he kept up a guerrilla warfare against the British and Tories in the upper part of Georgia. He was nearly always in the saddle, going quickly from place to place, seldom sleeping in a house, hiding in swamps and deep forests, suffering hunger and thirst, and enduring all kinds of hardships. His name became a terror to the enemy. He would strike them whenever he could, and would show them no mercy.

Augusta was in the hands of the British, and CLARKE declared he would never rest until they were driven out. From the day the Tory Colonel Brown took possession of it and hoisted the British flag, Clark began gathering recruits to attack him. Brown had been living in Augusta when the people first rebelled against the king, and had given such offense to the citizens that he was tarred and feathered and carried through the streets in cart by an angry mob. He had vowed vengeance against all patriots. CLARKE gathered his forces and camped before the town, and resolved never to leave until the British flag came down, and upper Georgia was freed of the presence of its enemies.

Colonel Elijah CLARKE succeeded in raising three hundred and fifty men to move against Augusta. To these were added eighty men from South Carolina. The army assembled at Soap Creek, forty miles above Augusta, and quietly marched upon that city. On the 14th of September, 1780, the army appeared before Augusta, to the surprise of Brown

CLARKE attacked an Indian camp at Hawk's Gully, on the west of town, and drove the Indians away. He captured about seventy prisoners and a large lot of Indian presents. The Indians and the British, under Brown, retired to a trading post called the "White House," which they prepared to defend. Under cover of the night Brown threw up earthworks around the house and filled in the spaces between the weather boarding and the plastering with sand and clay to make the house proof against bullets. CLARKE laid siege to the house, and the firing was constant. The water supply of the British was cut off, and the suffering of the wounded men became intense. Brown himself, wounded in the body, was in great agony, but his courage never forsook him. He had already sent messengers into South Carolina asking for relief. At the end of four days CLARKE heard that a force of British had appeared on the opposite side of the Savannah River.

CLARKE realized that he could not longer maintain the siege, and at once withdrew, leaving some badly wounded soldiers. He had no means of moving them and was obliged to abandon them to the mercy of the British. What this mercy was, is shown by the fact that Brown had thirteen of them hanged to the staircase in the "White House" in full view of his bed, where he lay wounded, in order that he might see their expiring agonies. Their bodies were given to the Indians, who, after scalping and mutilating them, threw them into the river. The other prisoners were given to the Indians, who tortured them to death. [Reference: B. Lawton, First Lessons in Georgia History (American Book Company: 1913), summarised by Barbara Walker Winge, [b a r b a r a w i n g e @ y a h o o . c o m]

Elijah CLARKE died 15 December 1779 in Richmond County, Georgia and was buried at Woodburn in Lincoln County. The remains of Elijah CLARKE and those of his wife Hannah Arrington CLARKE were moved to the National Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia in 1925.

Note 7: Charles HARRINGTON, who married Agnes HILL, was wounded in the Battle of Alamance on 16 May 1771 and briefly drew a pension from the Royalist government. He died of his wounds a short time later in 1772. The Battle of Alamance was the climax of the War of the Regulators. The children of Charles HARRINGTON and Agnes HILL were: Charles HARRINGTON (1748, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M]: m. Patience BRASWELL (? - AFT 2 April 1800, Logan County, Kentucky); Whitmell HARRINGTON (1749, North Carolina, British North America - 1798, <Deer Lodge, Morgan County>, Tennessee) [M]: m. Sarah ROWE, ABT 1780, North Carolina; Drury HARRINGTON (1752, North Carolina - 1839, Chambers County, Alabama) [M]: m. Rachael PETTY, 2 January 1774, Chatham County, North Carolina, British North America; John HARRINGTON (1753, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, British North America - 1792, Union County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Frances BURT (BIRT), ABT 1774, South Carolina; Sion HARRINGTON (1755, Pittsboro, Chatham County, North Carolina, British North America - 1828, Moore County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Elizabeth WATTS, 1776, North Carolina; Mary Elizabeth HARRINGTON (1756, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 1810, <Moore County>, North Carolina) [F]: m. Abner LANDRUM; Philemon HARRINGTON (1757, North Carolina, British North America - 1803, Chatham County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Frances ("Fanny") HARMON (? - AFT 1803, Hickman County, Tennessee), ABT 1781, Chatham County, Tennessee; Tabitha HARRINGTON (1758, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Robert JOHNSON; Thomas HARRINGTON (1760, North Carolina, British North America - ABT 1824, <Wilson County>, Tennessee) [M]: m. Raynor ("Lurany") HIGDON, ABT 1778, Chatham County, North Carolina; Enoch HARRINGTON (1762, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M]; and Isaac HARRINGTON (1763, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M].

  The State Records of North Carolina, vol. XXII, p. 479:

North Carolina:. At an assembly Held at New Bern in November & December, 1771:

These may certify that Charles HARRINGTON, a wounded Soldier in ---- Battle of Allamance against the Insurgents, was allowed the Sum of Twenty Pounds per Annum during the time he shall Continue disabled, and that the Public Treasures for the time being or either of them pay him the same, provided he once a year produce a Certificate from the Inferior Court of the County where he resides that he still Continues disabled and is a proper object of Public Bounty, as P'r report of the Special Committee for Settling and allowing the accounts on the late Expedition, Concurred with by the Governor, Council and Assembly.

Testator: James. Green, Jun., CIK

The origins of the War of the Regulators are expressed in the Regulators' Petition of which either Thomas HARRINGTON (Jr.) or Thomas HARRINGTON III was among the signatories (as Thomas ARRINGTON) [See above, note 6.]:

 

The Regulators' Petition

9 October 1769


Mr. Speaker and Gen't of the Assembly.

Humbly Showeth:

That the Province in General labour under general grievances, and the western part thereof under particular ones; which we not only see, but very sensibly feel, being crouch'd beneath our sufferings and not withstanding our sacred privileges, have too long yielded ourselves slaves to remorseless oppression. - Permit us to conceive it to be our inviolable right to make known our grievances, and to petition for redress as appears in the Bill of Rights pass'd in the reign of King Charles the first, as well as the Act of Settlement of the Crown of the Revolution. We therefore beg leave at the Act of the Settlement of the Crown of the Revolution. We therefore beg leave to lay before you a specimen thereof that your compassionate endeavors may tend to the relief of your injured Constituents, whose distressed condition call aloud for aid. The alarming cries of the oppressed possibly may reach your ears; but without your zeal how they shall ascend the throne - how relentless is the breast without sympathy, the heart that cannot bleed on a view of our calamity; to see tenderness removed, cruelty stepping in; and all our liberties and privileges invaded and abridg'd (by as it were) domestickes; who are conscious of their guilt and void of remorse. - O how darling! how relentless whilst impending Judgements loudly threaten and gaze upon them, with every emblem of merited destruction. A few of the many grievances are as follows, (viz't)

1. That the poor inhabitants in general are much oppress'd by reason of the disproportionate Taxes, and those of the western Counties in particular; as they are geneally in mean circumstances.

2. That no method is prescribed by law for the payment of the taxes of the Western Counties in produce (in lieu of a currency) as in other Counties within this Province to the Peoples great oppression.

3. That Lawyers, Clerks, and other petitioners; in place of being obsequious Servants for the Country's use, are become a nuisance, as the business of the people is often transacted without the least degree of fairness, the intention of the law evaded, exorbitant fees extorted, and the sufferers left to mourn under their oppressions.

4. That an Attorney should have it in his power, either for the sake of ease or interest, or to gratify their malevolence and spite, or commence suits to what courts he pleases, however inconvenient it may be to the Defendants; is a very great oppression.

5. That all unlawful fees taken in Indictment, where the Defendant is acquited by his Country (however customary it may be) is an oppression.

6. That Lawyers, Clerks, and others, extorting more fees than is intended by law; is also an oppression.

7. That the violation of the King's Instructions to his Delegates, their artfulness in concealing the same from him; and the great injury the People thereby sustains: is a manifest oppression.

And for remedy whereof, we take the freedom to recommend the following mode of redress, not doubting audience and acceptance which will not only tend to our relief, but command prayers at a duty from your humble Petitioners.

1. That at all elections each suffrage be given by Ticket & Ballot.
2. That the mode of Taxation be altered, and each person pay in proportion to the proffits arising from his Estate.
3. That no future tax be laid in Money, until a currency is made.
4. That there may be established a Western as well as a Northern and Southern District, and a Treasurer for the same.
5. That when a currency is made it may be let out by a loan office (on land security) and a Treasurer for the same
6. That all debts above 60s (shillings) and under 10 pounds be tried and determined without lawyers, by a jury of six freeholders, impaneled by a Justice, and that their verdict be enter'd by the said Justice, and be a final judgement.
7. That the Chief Justice have no perquisites, but a Salary only.
8. That Clerks be restricted in respect to fees, costs, and other things within the course of their office.
9. That Lawyers be effectively Barr'd from exacting and extorting fees.
10. That all doubts may be removed in respect to the payment of fees and costs on Indictments whereas the Defendant is not found guilty by the jury, and therefore acquited.
11. That the Assembly make known the Remonstrance to the King, the conduct of the cruel and oppressive Receiver of the Quit Rents, for omitting the customary easie and effectual method of collecting by distress, and pursuing the expensive mode of commencing suits in the most distant Courts.
12. That the Assembly in like manner make known that the Governor and Council fo frequently grant lands to as many as they think proper without regard to Head Rights, notwithstanding the contrariety of his Majesties instructions, by which means immence sums has been collected, and numerous Patents granted, for much of the most fertile lands in this Province, that is yet uninhabited and cultivated, environed by great numbers of poor people who are necessitated to toil in the cultivation of bad Lands whereon they hardly can subsist, who are thereby deprived of His Majesties liberality and Bounty nor is there the least regard paid to the cultivation clause in said Patent mentioned, as many of the said Council as well as their friends and favorites enjoy large quanitities of Lands under the above-mentioned circumstances.
13. That the Assembly communicates in like manner the Violation of His Majesties Instructions respecting the Land Office by the Governor and Council, and of their own rules, customs and orders. If it be sufficiently proved, that after they had granted Warrants for some Tracts of Land, and that the same was in due time suvey'd and returned and the Patent fees timely paid into the said office; and that if a private Council was called to avoid spectators, and peremptory orders made that Patents should not be granted; and Warrants by their orders arbitrarily to have been issued in the names of other Persons for the same Lands, and if when intreated by a solicitor they refus'd to render so much as a reason for their so doing, or to refund any part of the money paid by them extorted.
14. That some method may be pointed out that every Improvement on Lands in any of the Proprietors part be proved when begun, by whom, and every sale made, that the eldest may have the preference of at least 300 acres.
15. That all taxes in the following Counties be paid as in other Counties in the Province (i.e.) in the produce of the County and that warehouses be erected as follows (viz), In Anson County at Isom Haleys Ferry Landing on PeeDee River, Rowan and Orange at Cambleton in Cumberland County, Mecklenburg at __?___ on the Catawba River, and in Tryon County at __?__ on __?__ River.
16. That every denomination of People may marry according to their respective mode Ceremony and customs after due publication or License.
17. That Doc't Benjamin Franklin or some other known patriot be appointed agent, to represent the unhappy state of this Province to his Majesty, and to solicit the several Boards in England.

  John Snor-------------------Jonathan Gowers----------------Jason Meadow
Isaac Armstrong-----------Stokey Yeamons-----------------Robert Broadaway
William Thomson---------Thomas Harper------------------Samuel Tonehberg
Auth'd Hutchins----------- John Johnson------------------- Samuel Flake
Seamor Almond ----------- James Upton------------------- Thomas Balice
Isaac Falconberg -------- Jacob Watson------------------- John Preslie
Francis Smith--------------- Isham Belvin------------------- John Cartright
John Jeffrey------------------- Owen Slaughter------------------- Thomas Lacy
Neal French------------------- Thomas Wright------------------- John Jackson
Jero Miller------------------- Patrick Sanders------------------- Joseph French
Tiery Robinson------------------- John Ryle------------------- William Newberry
Gabrill Davis------------------- John Culpepper------------------- Leonard Webb
Aquila Jones------------------- John Jones, Sr.------------------- Julius Holley
Thomas Tallant------------------- Wm. Grifen Hogon-------------- John James Junr.
James Denson------------------- Robert Maner------------------- John James Senr
William Raiford------------------- John Watts------------------- Jimmey James
John I. Merree ------------------- John Davis ------------------- Jonathan Helms
George Wilson------------------- Richard Leak------------------- Tilmon Helms
Robert Webb------------------- Charles Hines------------------- James Sanders
Thomas Taylor------------------- James McIlvanilly---------------- John Bailey
David Smith------------------- Van Swearingen------------------- Samuel Gaylord
James Barker------------------- William Hore------------------- Richard Sands
John Mims----------------------- Joseph Martin------------------- Jason Irol Hinsinbru
John Brooks Junr---------------- Thomas Nelson---------------- Thomas Preslar
William C.B.Bond---------------- William Burns------------------- Thomas Culpepper
John Bond---------------------- John Leveritt---------------------- Daniel Culpepper
Moses M. Tallant---------------- Theofilis Williams------------------- John Snider
Benjamin Dumas ---------------- William Leveritt------------------- William Mims
Joseph White------------------ James Williams---------------------- Robert Smith
William Sidden----------------- John Coleman---------------------- Zachariah Smith
Silvannus Waker---------------- Meeagar Edwards------------------- John Smith
John Smith (Sandhill)----------- Anthony Mathis------------------- John Thomas
David Dumas------------------- Fagan Gring ------------------------- William Burt
Benjamin Smith------------------- Samuel Ratcliff------------------- Edward Smith
William Benton------------------- John Long-------------------------- Elijah Clark
William Coleman------------------- Charles Smith------------------- John Clark
Alexander McPherson-------------- James Bound (Bond?)-------- James Adams
E. Pickett ---------------------------- Abraham Pelyou------------------- Thomas Mason Junr
Thomas Gowers------------------- Jason Meadow Junr------------- John Bennet
Jonathan Turner------------------- Daniel Laws ----------------------- Thadwick Hogins
Barnabee Skipper------------------- Abraham Bellow------------------- Thomas Barrotz
George Skipper------------------- Thomas Donnor ------------------- James E. Arnet
John Jenkins----------------------- Joseph Hindes------------------- Thomas Trull
David Phelps----------------------- William Haley ------------------- William Culpepper
John McNish ----------------------- Francis Clark------------------- John Thomas Suggs
Jonathan Lewellyn ---------------- Jeremiah Terrell ------------------- John Hornbeck
Leonard Franklyn------------------- Darass Burns------------------- William Dinkins
Edward Almond ------------------- Thomas Baley------------------- Thomas Dinkins
Thomas Mims------------------- Stephen Bush--------------------- Marverick Layn
John Stinkberry ------------------- Jacob Cockerham----------------- Waterman Boatman
William Leaton------------------- John Flowel --------------------- John Simmons
Luke Robinson------------------- Stephen Jackson---------------- Augustine Prestwood
John Webb----------------------- John Jones --------------------- Richard Downs
Andrew Griffin ------------------- Archelam Moorman---------------- Samuel Ratcliff Junr
George Estress------------------- William Digge------------------- Elisha Ratcliff
James Griffin--------------------- Bennakia Moorman ------------------- John Poston
William Estress------------------- William Haley Junr ------------------- John Poston senr
Stephen Bush--------------------- John Mathews ------------------- Ned Mathes
Joseph Burcham ------------------ James Mathews ------------------- Benjamin Bunt
Stephen Piecock------------------- Joseph Webb----------------------- Jowl Jormal
Robert Jarman ------------------- Andrew Falconbery ---------------- Yomond Lloyd
William Thredgill ------------------- Isaac Falconbert Junr----------- Thomas Lucas
Robert Lowery ------------------- Henry Falconbery ------------------- Wlliam Lucas
Denes Norlen---------------------- David Cox ------------------------ Christopher Butler
Lewis Lowery ---------------------- John Horback------------------- John Sowel
Edward Chambers---------------- Beaty Web----------------------- Edward Morris
Thomas Pickett------------------- Isaac Inceste ------------------- William Treneen
William Ussery ------------------- William Web------------------- John Williams
William Jowers------------------- Walter Gibson------------------- John Burcham
Shadrach Denson ---------------- Silvester Gibson--------------- William Sowel
Joseph Harrison----------------- Burlingham Rudd-------------- John Carpenter
Joseph Howelt------------------- John Murphy---------------------- Francis Jourden
Thomas Ussery------------------- John Liles ---------------------- Henry Burcham
John Thomas------------------- James Liles---------------------- William Morris
Benjamin Covington------------- Thomas ARRINGTON------------------- John Morgan
Isam Haley ----------------------- Thomas Mackneih------------------- James Burcham
Silas Haley----------------------- Thomas Fox ---------------------- James Sanders
George Belvin------------------- Henry Stokes ---------------------- Joseph Morris
William Blewet ------------------- John Brooks Junr ------------------- Samuel Sowel
Charles Sowell------------------- William Lucas Junr ------------------- Welcome Ussery
James Gibson------------------- Joseph Allen ---------------------- Matthew Raiford junr
William Gibson ------------------- William Morris Junr------------------- Elisha Thomson
John Hunt-------------------------- Lewis Sowell--------------------- John Thompson
Richard Braswell------------------- John Skinner------------------- Goin C. Morgan
George Braswell ------------------- Jesse Wallas

See Colonial Records, vol. VIII, 1769-1771, pp. 81-82 and pp. 241-244, by Saunders; also: North Carolina History Told By Contemporaries, pp.87-93, by Lefler; also: The War of The Regulators and The Battle of Alamance: May 16, 1771, by William S. Powell.

 

ALAMANCE BATTLEGROUND
[http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/hs/alamance/alamanc.htm]

"He gave the Regulators a choice—to return peacefully to their homes or be fired upon. They had one hour to decide. After the hour was up Tryon sent an officer to receive their reply. 'Fire and be damned!' was their answer. The governor then gave the order, but his men hesitated. Rising in his stirrups, he shouted, 'Fire! Fire on them or on me!' The militia obeyed, the Regulators responded in kind, and the battle of Alamance was on."

—from The War of the Regulation and the Battle of Alamance
by William S. Powell

Formation of the Regulators

During the years preceding the American Revolution many North Carolina people experienced strong feelings of discontent with the way the provincial government conducted the affairs of the colony. Their quarrel was not with the form of government or the body of laws but with abuses by government officials.

Grievances affecting the daily lives of the colonists included excessive taxes, dishonest sheriffs, and illegal fees. Scarcity of money contributed to the state of unrest. Those residing in the western part of the province were isolated and unsympathetic with the easterners. It was in those frontier counties that the War of the Regulation began.

Minor clashes occurred until the spring of 1768, when an association of "Regulators" was formed. Wealthier colonists considered them to be a mob. The Regulators never had an outstanding leader, though several men were prominent in the movement; including James Hunter, Rednap Howell, William Butler, and Herman Husband. Husband, a Quaker and disciple of Benjamin Franklin, circulated political pamphlets seeking to effect peaceful reform.

Violent Resistance

Discouraged over failure to secure justice through peaceful negotiations, the reformers took a more radical stand. Violence, lawlessness, and terrorism reigned. When punitive measures were taken against them, the Regulators defiantly refused to pay fees, terrorized those who administered the law, and disrupted court proceedings.

It fell to royal governor William Tryon to bring the backcountry revolt to a speedy conclusion. In March 1771, the governor's council advised Tryon to call out the militia and march against the rebel farmers.

Volunteers for the militia were mustered. When the expedition finally got under way, Gen. Hugh Waddell was ordered to approach Hillsborough by way of Salisbury, with Cape Fear and western militia at his command. Tryon and his army proceeded more directly toward Hillsborough. Waddell, with a force of only 284 men, was accosted on his way by a large body of Regulators. Since he was outnumbered, the general elected to turn back. On May 11, Governor Tryon and his forces left Hillsborough intending to go to Waddell's rescue. After resting on the banks of Alamance Creek in the heart of Regulator country, Tryon gathered his army of approximately one thousand men. Five miles away, the army of Regulators, about two thousand strong, had assembled.

The Battle of Alamance

The battle began on May 16 after the Regulators rejected Tryon's suggestion that they disperse peacefully. Lacking leadership, organization, and adequate munitions, the Regulators were no match for Tryon's militia. Many Regulators fled the field of battle, leaving their bolder comrades to fight on.

The rebellion of the Regulators was crushed by military defeat. Nine members of the militia were killed and sixty-one wounded. The Regulator losses were much greater, though exact numbers are not known. Tryon took fifteen prisoners, of whom seven were executed later. Many Regulators moved on to other frontier areas beyond North Carolina. Those who stayed were offered pardons by the governor in exchange for pledging an oath of allegiance to the royal government.

The War of the Regulation illustrates the dissatisfaction of a large segment of the population during the time before the American Revolution. The boldness with which reformers opposed royal authority provided a lesson in the use of armed resistance, which revolutionaries employed a few short years later in the War for Independence.

Note 8: Agnes HILL, the wife of Charles HARRINGTON, was the daughter of Robert HILL (Sr.) (1678, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - AFT 18 June 1762, Halifax County, North Carolina, British North America) and Tabitha GREEN (ABT 1765, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - April 1765, Halifax County, North Carolina, British North America). [See below, note 11.]

Note 9: Drury HARRINGTON, the son of Charles HARRINGTON and Agnes HILL, was listed under the command of Capt. Stephen POE in the Chatham County, North Carolina Regimental Return of 23 September 1772. His daughter, Rachael HARRINGTON (21 July 1792, Union County, South Carolina - AFT 9 May 1853, Tusacaloosa, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama) was married to Larkin POE, the son of Capt. Stephen POE, on 20 March 1811. Also included in the Chatham County, North Carolina Regimental Return of 23 September 1772, but under the command of Capt. John Montgomery, was Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.).

Chatham County, North Carolina: Regimental Return of 23 September 1772

A list of men commanded by Capt. Stephen POE - List No. 1

  Stephen POE, Capt.
Simon POE, Lieut.
William Malone, 'Insine'
John Stewart, Clk
Robert Marsh, Sergt.
Joseph Stewart, Sergt.
Pretteman Brewer, Sergt.
David Banks, Corp'l
Rich'd West, Corp'l         }
Joshua Gunter?, Corp'l
George Dillard, Drummer
Wm. Sanders
Wm. Cain
Benjamin Watt
Charles Stewart
Barthellemew Odeneal (O'Donal?)
James Stewart, Sen'r
James Stewart, Jun'r
Thos. Malone
James Massey
John Berrey
Wm. Riddell
Rubin Pettey
Charles Atkinson
Thos. Robertson, Sen.
Drewry HARRINGTON
John Dillard
Thos. Stone
Wm. Dillard
]James Banks
John Riddle
Arthur Ledbetter
Nathaniel Page
Rich'd Gunter
James Pettey
Stephen Straughan
Nimrod Burks
John Morton
Lewis Ledbetter
John Mullis
John Longaday
Wm. Roberson
Daniel Drumman
John Cox
Sion Harington
thos. Watts, Jun.
Michel Loper/Lopes
Daniel Foshe
Isom Carlile
Joseph Foshe
Thos. Massie
Robt. Carlile
Joshua Petty
Hubird Petty
Daniel Copeland
Daniel Mackbin? Macklin?
Larking Strawn
Stephen Fountin
Robt. Thomasson
Stephen Herndon
Geo. Morgan
Joseph Morgin
Nathan Fike
James Ray
Charles Millikin
Wm. Bullington
James Pettey
James Roberson
James Bullard
Geo. Herndon
John Nash
Laban Ellis
Drewry Banks
Ambrus George
John Brooks
James Henderson
James Robards
Reuben Massie
John Watts
Joseph Foshe, Jun.
Absolem Pettey
Isack Henderson
Thos. Roberson, Jun'r
Even Tomas
John Dunkin
Wm. Foshe
John Ham
James Younger
Ephrem Cook
Robt. Dunkin
Peter Dunkin
Geo. Dunkin
John Page
Rich'd Stawn (Strawn/Straughan)
Charles Evrengton/Evengton
Mallicah Fike
David Brumblo
Mathew Dunkin
John Ward
Spencer Steward
John Foshe
Simon Foshe
John Hodgins
John Pilkinson
Robt Johnson
Benjam'n Haguewood
Ellithen (Elnathan) Davis
Nathan Fike
Senus Fountin
Total: 107 men

Note 9: William HARRINGTON, it is said, migrated to South Carolina.

Note 10: Deeds and Abstracts of North Carolina: Drury HARRINGTON, the husband of Luraina Mary HILL:

 

May 1785 - Administration is granted to Laurilla HARRINGTON on the estate of Drury HARRINGTON, her deceased husband, with Wm. R. Davie and Thomas HILL security in the sum of 10,000. Inventory of the estate of Drury HARRINGTON, deceased, returned.

August 1785 - Account Sales of the estate of Drury HARRINGTON, deceased, returned by John Jones Admr. On petition of Laraney HARRINGTON ordered that a writ for alloting her dower issue.

Halifax County Deed Book 15, 1457 - (1487) Writ of Dower of Lurany HARRINGTON, wife of Drewery HARRINGTON deceased 29 October 1785. Witness: Lunsford Long, Deputy Clerk. The widow's third was 306 acres, joining Jacket Swamp, Peter Daniel, Thomas ARRINGTON. (This Thomas ARRINGTON is Thomas HARRINGTON). November Court 1785.

August 1788 - Ordered that the administrators of Drury HARRINGTON, deceased, sell one negro girl belonging to the said estate to satisfy the debts.

November 1788 - Commissioners are appointed to divided the estate of Drury HARRINGTON, deceased.

Deed Book 18: 547-(445) William C. HILL of Halifax County to John Branch of same. 18 April 1799. 30, 60 acres which 1/8 of 183 2/3 acres, the other 7/8 now held by said John Branch & the widow Larany HARRINGTON, on both sides of Jacket Swamp, said tract having been owned by Drury HARRINGTON, deceased. Wm. C. HILL. May Court 1799.

Note 12: Luraina Mary HILL, the wife of Drury HARRINGTON, was the daughter of Robert HILL (Sr.) (1678, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - AFT 18 June 1762, Halifax County, North Carolina, British North America) and Tabitha GREEN (ABT 1765, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - April 1765, Halifax County, North Carolina, British North America). In addition to Agnes HILL, the wife of Charles HARRINGTON, her siblings were: Sion HILL (ABT 1707, Isle of Wight County, Virginia British North America - December 1780, Wake County, North Carolina) [M]; Green HILL (ABT 1709, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - ?) [M]; Abner HILL (ABT 1711, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - ?) [M]; Mary HILL (ABT 1715, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. William BRYANT; Ann HILL (ABT 1718, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America -?) [F]: m. John STEED, 1734; Tabitha HILL (ABT 1720, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - ?) [F]: m. David CHAPMAN (Sr.), Edgecombe County, North Carolina, British North America; Thomas HILL (Sr.) (ABT 1723, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - AFT 27 November 1787 and BEF 1789, Halifax County, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Sarah ETHERIDGE, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, British North America; William HILL (ABT 1731, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - BEF 1806, <Hancock County>, Georgia) [M]: m. Charity LEWIS, ABT 1754, Edgecombe County, North Carolina, British North America; and Milbry HILL (ABT 1733, Bertie County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Matthew GIBBS.

   

____________________________
____________________________

G0497A: John HARRINGTON [007]
Birth: ABT 1719, Chowan [later, Anson] County, North Carolina, British North America
Death: 25 March 1748, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America
Father: Thomas HARRINGTON (Sr.) (ABT 1690, Chowan [later, Bertie] County, North Carolina, British North America (BY 11 February 1744/45, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America)
Mother: Mary WHITMELL (ABT 1690, <Charles City County>, Virginia, British North America - 1743, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America) [See G0498A: Mary WHITMELL, in Descendants of Thomas Whitmell I (BY 1666 - BY 4 December 1693).]

Marriage: ABT 1739, North Carolina, British North America
Spouse: Mary ROGERS (ABT 1721, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 17 October 1750, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America)

Child 1: Charles HARRINGTON (ABT 1741, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 24 May 1796 and BY July 1796, Anson County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Permelia ("Bena") UNKNOWN, ABT 1762, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America

Child 2: Elizabeth HARRINGTON (ABT 1743, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 13 August 1812 and BEF 4 March 1816, Wilkes County, Georgia) (F): m. Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) (ABT 1728, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - 3 October 1792, Phillips Mill, Wilkes County, Georgia), ABT 1762 [See G0496A: Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.), in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]

Child 3: Agnes HARRINGTON (ABT 1745, North Carolina - ?) [F]

Child 4: Whitmell HARRINGTON (20 February 1747, North Carolina, British North America - 15 April 1774, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America) [M]: m. Frances SMITH

Note 1: Mary ROGERS, the widow of John HARRINGTON, was second married to John COLSON (Jr.) (ABT 1720 - AFT 20 September 1789 and BY July 1791, Marlborough County, South Carolina) and, by him, engendered William COLSON (ABT 1749, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - BY 1786). After the death of Mary ROGERS, John COLSON was second married to Margaret UNKNOWN.

The following account of John COLSON is from the GEDCOM of Ms. Eleanor Colson. See the Colson Family Genealogy at: http://members.aol.com/eleanorcol/colsonfam.html

  6 November 1746. 200 acres granted to John COLLSON, in fork of Greate Pee Dee and Rockey Rivers. (He sells this in April 1751 to James Barten.)

26 November 1746. 200 acres granted to John COLLSON, N side of Great Pee Dee above mouth of Brown Creek at John CLARK's lower corner. (He sells this to John CHEEK in 1750 below, then John CHEEK sells it to John Stephens in 1764)

26 November 1746. 400 acres granted to John COLLSON, N side Great Pee Dee above mouth of Little River at Nicholas Smith's corner. (He sells this 20 October 1750 to John CLARK)

28 June 1750. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A?, pp. 58-59: John COLLSON of Anson County, planter, to John Cheek of same, for 50 proclamation money . . . 200 acres on N side Great Pee Dee above mouth Brown Creek at John Clarks lower corner . . . granted to John COLLSON 26 November 1746 . . . John COLLSON (Seal), Wit: John Dunn, Anthony Hutchins.

19 September 1750. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A?, pp. 67-68: Thomas George of Anson County, planter, to John COLLSON of same, planter, for 12 Virginia Money . . . 100 acres on S side Pee Dee, granted to Thomas George 4 April 1750 . . . Thomas George (seal), Wit: Thomas Harrington (T), John Cheeks (I)

17 October 1750. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A?, p. 69: John COLLSON to Elizabeth, Agnes, and Whitmill HARRINGTON, 2 daughters and son of my wife Mary by her former husband Mr. John HARRINGTON, for natural love and affection . . . negroes and cattle . . . and John and Mary COLLSON to our son William COLLSON . . . all are minors . . . shall be kept until Whitmill the youngest, shall arrive at 21, which shall be 20 February 1768 . . . John COLLSON (seal), Mary COLLSON (M) (seal), Wit: None.

20 October 1750. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A, pp. 121-122: John COLLSON of Anson County, to John CLARK of same, Gent., for 500, land on N side Great Pee Dee above mouth of Little River at Nicholas Smith's corner, 400 acres, Jacob COLLSONs line, granted to John COLSON 26 Nov 1746. John COLLSON {seal}, Wit: William Overalt, Nathaniel Hillen.

12 April 1751. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A, pp. 117-118: John COLLSON of Anson County planter, to Samuel French, of same, planter, for 15 Virginia money. Land on S side Pee Dee bought of Thomas George, 100 acres. Granted Thomas George 4 April 1750. John COLLSON {seal}. Wit: M. Brown, Thomas MOORMAN.

April 1751. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book B, pp. 200-201: John COLLSON of Anson County, planter, to James Barten of same, planter, for 16 proclamation money, 200 acres in fork of Greate Pee Dee and Rockey Rivers, granted to COLLSON 6 November 1746. John COLLSON {seal}. Wit: M. Brown, Thos. Norman.

20 April 1752. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book A?, pp. 69-70: James Crafford of Anson County, planter, to John COLLSON of same planter, for 30 proclamation Money . . . land in fork of Great Pee Dee and Rockey River . . . granted to John COLLSON 26 November 1746, sold to James Barton 17 April 1751, and by Barton to James Crafford 27 April 1751, 200 acres . . . James Crafford, Wit: Anthony Hutchins, Caleb Touchstone.

22 April 1756. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book 1, pp. 153-154: Benjamin Dumas of Anson County, to John COLLSON of same, for 50, on S side Great Pee Dee, adjacent John Hall, granted 27 Feb 1756. Benjamin Dumas {seal}, Martha Dumas (X) {seal}, Wit: Jeremiah Dumas, Zechariah Smith, Edmund Lilly.

4 August 1757. Anson County, North Carolina Deed Book 1, pp. 267-268: Andrew MOORMAN, planter, to John COLLSON, planter, both of Anson County, for 60 Virginia money, part of a tract that was John Hornbacks, on S side Great Pee Dee, on mouth of Walkers gut, 200 acres granted to said Horback 21 June 1746, conveyed to Charles MOORMAN and Benjamin, by them to said Andrew MOORMAN. Andrew MOORMAN {seal}. Wit: David Dumas, Jeremiah Dumas.

1763 List of Taxables, Anson County, North Carolina:
  John COLLSON - payed tax on 14 people, himself and:
Charles HARRINGTON
Whipmell (Whitmell) HARRINGTON
Negroes:
Jack, Syphoor, Danah, Linda, Dinah, Jr, Mole, Philles, William, Shewell, John, and Purkins

7 Jan 1765. Anson County, North Carolina, p. 173: John COLSON of Anson, to John Culpepper of same, planter, for 40 proclamation money. 200 acres on Brown Cr, S side PD. John COLSON {seal}, Wit: Elijah Gibson, John Presler, Chas. HARRINGTON.

John COLSON was a friend of the famous Tory, David Fanning, and was arrested as a Loyalist sympathizer, but pressure from family, friends and neighbors seems to have changed his mind.

"From the Journal of the Provincial Congress at Hillsboro, 20 August 1775, it appears John COULSON, an individual of some considerable influence in this county was brought before Congress and solemnly recanted his political opinions and promised to aid, support and defend the just right of America." From Historical Sketches of North Carolina, John Hill Wheeler, p. 25.

The land that John COULSON owned at the Great Pee Dee and Rockey River (present day Stanley County, North Carolina) was confiscated by the Continental Congress because of his support of the British during the revolution, and a complaint was brought before the Provisional Government of North Carolina around 1786. John COULSON claimed he had given the land to his son William COLSON, already dead, and William had passed the land on in his will to his son John. The land was returned to the younger John COLSON (6 Jan 1787).

Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, volume I - John COLSON listed several times.

  Refugee of Second Class now in Charlestown, South Carolina, 28 May 1782 - John COLSON, Rank - refugee, North Carolina 1 April - 31 May 1782

John COLSON, refugee, 30 days, 1 June -30 June 1782
John COLSON, North Carolina, refugee, 62 days, 1 July - 31 August 1782 Attest: Robert GRAY, Pay Master Militia
John COLSON, North Carolina, refugee, 122 days, 1 September - 31 December 1782

Refugee Hospital: Charlestown, South Carolina
John COLSON, Steward, 23 days, 31 August - 31 December 1781
John COLSON, Steward, 59 days, 1 January - 28 February 1782
John COLSON, Steward, 61 days, 1 March - 30 April 1782
John COLSON, Steward, 28 May 1782
John COLSON, Steward, 61 days, May - 30 June 1782, 13 July 1782
John COLSON, Steward, 62 days, 1 July - 31 August 1782
John COLSON, Steward, 122 days, 1 September - 31 December 1782, 9 November 1782

05 November 1787. 400 acres belonging to John COLESON confiscated and sold on this date to William Wood for 303?

The following is copied from the State Records of North Carolina, vol. 21, 1788:

  The committee, to whom the Petition of Stephen HYDE was refered, setting fourth that about twelve years ago he intermarried with Susanna Fanning daughter of John COLSON, that in consequence of such marriage the said COLSON gave him a tract of Land in Anson County Containing 650 Acres and which he possessed until the year 1786, when Charles Bruce, Esquire, Commissioner of Confiscated property for the district of Salisbury advertised and sold the said 650 Acres of Land as the property of said COLSON; Reported, That the aforesaid Land was sold by a legal officer and agreeable to Law, it is the opinion of your Committee it cannot with propriety be restored to the said HYDE; but beg leave that the Comptroller be directed to issue a Certificate to him to the full amount the said Land sold for, property chequed and numbered, to be equal value of Audited Certificates.
All which is submitted.

THOMAS PERSON, Chairman

26 April 1790, Anson County, North Carolina, Receipt No. 568, to Stephen HIDE 503 for land sold as confiscated land as per resolve of the Assembly: (on back) "Anson County son-in-law John COLSON"; 503 + 188.12.9 (interest) = 691.12.9 (total); (on a second line;) 503 + 125.14.11 (interest) = 628.14.11 (total)

22 September 1786 sold 400 acres to William Wood for 303, No. 10; on both sides of Brown Cr; formerly John COULSON's property; border: Ben Smith's first line, Denson, & John Cheek; (signed) Charles Bruce

John COLSON's land was confiscated and sold because he was a Tory. His son-in-law Stephen HYDE repurchased the land.

From ANSON COUNTY HERITAGE - NORTH CAROLINA:

  COLSON'S FERRY

This square mile piece of land in Montgomery County (formed from Anson in 1779) is an historically significant spot of North Carolina. John COLSON operated a tavern, mills, trading post, and most important, a ferry over the PeeDee River. COLSON was a Tory, a large land holder, and Burgess of Anson County. The first white man known to cross the PeeDee here was John Lawson in his explorations of 1701. June 16, 1771, General Hugh Waddell, enroute to supress the Regulator activity and raise the militia, crossed the PeeDee here. His encampment was at COLSON's. In July 1780, Col. Wm. Lee Davidson defeated Col. Samuel Bryan and 250 Tories at COLSON's. Bran retreated to South Carolina. COLSON went with him, never to return. COLSON's properties were confiscated and sold. General Nathaiel Greene established a depot or magazine at COLSON's in January 1781. Col Tadeuz Kosciusko, the famous Polish patriot and military engineer, built a palisade fort here, to protect Gen Greene's depot. Generals Caldwell, Rutledge, and Summers served at this depot. In 1781, General Huger, enroute to Guilford Courthouse, crossed the river at COLSON's ferry. Following the battle at Guilford Courthouse, Gen. Greene harassed Gen. Cornwallis across Chatham and Moore Counties. When Cornwallis turned east toward Wilmington, Greene turned back toward South Carolina via the PeeDee Road. At COLSON's Gen Greene was held up for four days by high water, before he could cross the PeeDee. This was truly a major crossroad in the Southern War of the Revolution.

According to an article in Historical Book of Anson County, John COLSON was a magistrate at the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions. He served as a juror and was active in civil affairs until he was accused of being a Tory.

From Robert Ellis COLSON:

  Abstract of Act: Montgomery County, North Carolina. 6 January 1787, vol. 24, p. 883

An act vesting certain land in John COLSON, to son William COLSON, in fee simple. Almost 14 years ago [1773] John COLSON made a deed of gift to his son, William COLSON, of a parcel of land in Montgomery/Anson County, North Carolina. During the late war (1776-1782) John COLSON above "attached himself to the common enemy and withdrew himself from the state." The son, William COLSON, from above died some years after the deed, but left behind a son by the name of John COLSON. This act was attempting to vest title to the property in the second John COLSON, son of William COLSON. The grandson's, John COLSON, claim to the land was denied because the original John COLSON had forfeited his rights to the property, because he was a Tory. The grandson, John COLSON, later moved to Burke County Georgia. [Abstract by the late Helen Coalson Boen]

Will of John COLSON:

  Anson County Wills C. R. 005.801.7 (loose will):

Will of John COLSON ... to my beloved wife Margret COLSON, all my Household furnature and two cows and year ouls, also two Negroes Cloe and Peter, during her natural life and at her death I give them to my grand son John Colson HYDE and to his Heirs for Ever; to my grandaughter Mary COLSON daughter of my son John COLLSON deceast. on Negro boy Ned if she arrives to the age of Eighteen, but should she die before that age, the negro boy to be the property of Jane HYDE my granddaughter and to her heirs forever the said negro boy to be and remain in the possession of Stephen HYDE until the heir comes of age to receive him; my son in law Stephen HYDE of Anson County and the State of North Carolina also my trusted and beloved friend Stephen Parker of the State of South Carolina and County of Marlburogh to be executors . . . 20 September 1789

John COLSON
(Seal)
Wit. Moses Knight, Aaron Knight.

State of South Carolina) July Court 1791. Then this Last Will & Testament of John COLSON deceased was duly proven before William Thomas Esquire of South Carolina by a Dedmis from this Court directed to the said William Thomas or Morgan Brown esquire by the oaths of Moses Knight and Aron Knight.

Test Wm Johnson clk.

Following transcribed by John Norwood:

  Laws of North Carolina - 1786
Chapter LXXXII.
An Act Vesting Certain Lands therein mentioned in John COLSON, son of
William COLSON, in fee simple.

Whereas it is represented to this General Assembly that about fourteen years ago, a certain John COLSON made a gift to his son William COLSON, of a piece or parcel of land lying near the mouth of Rocky River in Montgomery County, containing by estimation three hundred and fifty-one acres, and actually put his said son in possession of the same; And whereas the said John COLSON during the last war attached himself to the common enemy, and withdrew himself from the state without having made unto his son William any deed of conveyance for the said lands: And whereas William COLSON died some years after, left behind a son named by the name of John COLSON and by his last will and testament devised to his said son John the aforesaid piece or parcel of land, which in the opinion of some of the citizens of this State is confiscated, as being the property of John, father of the said William, and the Commissioner of confiscated property for the district of Salisbury hath seized the said lands as the property of John COLSON, father of the said William COLSON, in order to sell and dispose of the same for the use of the state: For the prevention of which, I. Be it Enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That the title of a piece or parcel of lands in Montgomery county, near the mouth of Rocky River, containing by estimation three hundred and fifty-one acres, which the said John COLSON gave to his son, William COLSON, be and is hereby vested in the said John COLSON, son of William COLSON aforesaid, his heirs and assigns forever; any law to the contrary notwithstanding. (Passed Jan. 6, 1787.)

Laws of North Carolina - 1788
Chapter LI
An Act to Authorize and Enable John COLSON to return into this State,
and Exercise the Privileges therein mentioned.

Whereas it hath been made appear to the General Assembly, that John COLSON, late of Anson county, in this state, did convey and transfer unto his grand children a considerable part of his estate, both real and personal, whereof he stood seized and possessed, and did remove himself out of the limits and jurisdiction of this state, having left considerable debts unpaid due by him to sundry of the inhabitants of this state: And whereas suits have been commenced against the said John COLSON for the recovery of the said debts, by attachment and otherwise, which will tend greatly to oppress and injure the grand children of the said John COLSON, by depriving them of their respective donations, unless he should be permitted to return and settle his affairs: For remedy whereof I. Be it Enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby Enacted by the authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this act, it shall and may be lawful for the said John COLSON, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, to sue and be sued, implead or be impleaded, answer or be answered in any court of record in this state, for all and singular sums of money due to him or owing by him the said John COLSON, in any manner whatsoever; any law to the contrary notwithstanding: Provided nevertheless, That nothing in this act contained, shall be construed to authorize or enable the said John COLSON to commence or prosecute any suit, either in law or equity in this State until he shall have previously before some Justice of the Peace, or before one of the Judges of the Superior Court, taken and subscribed an oath of allegiance and fidelity to this state. Read three times and ratified in General Assembly, at Fayetteville, the 6th day of December, 1788, except chapters 41 and 43, which were ratified the 15th of November, chapter 21, the 29th of November, and chapter 26, the 4th of December, 1788.

ALEXANDER MARTIN, S. S.

John SITGREAVES, S. H. C.
The forgoing is a true copy:
James GLASGOW, Secretary.

Laws of North Carolina - 1790
Chapter XL.
An Act it Amend an Act Passes at Fayetteville, in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-Eight Entitled "An Act to Authorize and Enable John COLSON to return into this State, and Exercise the Privileges Therein mentioned.

Whereas, it has been made to this General Assembly that the said John COLSON has, in obedience to the above recited Act, taken the oath of allegiance and fidelity to this State as by law prescribed, of which there is a record in the Clerk's office of the county of Anson. I. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of North Carolina, and it is hereby Enacted by the authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful for the said John COLSON to sue and be sued, implead or be impleaded, answer or be answered, in any court of record either in law or equity in this State, for all and singular estate, either real or personal, in any manner whatsoever, in as full, fair plain and ample a manner, to all intents and purposes, as if the said John COLSON had not withdrawn himself from the protection of this State, any law, custom, or usage to the contrary notwithstanding: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to invalidate the sales of any lands or other property, that have been or hereafter may be sold under any of the confiscation laws of this State, late the property of the said John COLSON.

Note 2: Will of Charles HARRINGTON: 24 May 1796, State of North Carolina, Anson County:

  In the name of God, amen, I Charles ARRINGTON of the county of Anson and State of North Carolina being of sound and perfect mind and memory, blessed be God do this twenty fourth day May and in the year of our Lord one thousand seven and ninety six, make and publish this my last Will and Testament in manner following. That is to say first, I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Bena ARRENTON, one mare and saddle and saddle (struck through) one bed and furniture. I also, I lend to her during her life time (time struck through) or widowhood, all the stock of cattle, hogs, and sheep, wagon, one saddle horse and colt, I also lend her all my plantation tools and household furniture, I also lend to my wife, one Negro boy George till my son William comes of age or marries and then I give George to my son William ARRINGTON, I also lend to my wife, one Negro girl Jude her life time or widowhood after that Jude and her increase to be divided between my daughters, but if she should have more children than one apiece then to be divided among my sons and daughters. I also give to my daughter Nanse CROSWELL twenty-five pounds current money of North Carolina. I also give to my daughter, Nelly HUDSON, twenty-five pounds, North Carolina currency. I also give to my daughter, Mary STEGALL, twenty-five pounds current money of North Carolina and twenty-five pound of feathers and one cow, and one mare and saddle one sow and pigs, one dish and three plates. [This part of the will is very hard to read, as it appears that some of it was written over the other.] I also give to my daughter, Sukey, twenty five pounds current money of North Carolina and twenty three weight of feathers, one mare, and saddle, one cow, one sow and pigs, one dish and three plates. I also give to my son, John ARRINGTON, one Negro man named Jack and twenty-five pounds North Carolina currency and one horse and saddle, one cow and one sow and pigs, and twenty-three weight of feathers and six plates and a dish. I also give to my son Whitmill, one Negro man, Abram, one horse and saddle and twenty-five pounds North Carolina currency and twenty three weight of feathers, one cow, one sow and pigs, six plates, and one dish. I also give to my son William ARRINGTON, one horse and saddle and twenty three weight of feathers and twenty five pounds of North Carolina currency, one cow, one sow and pigs, six plates and one dish and I hereby make and ordain my worthy friends, Richmond CROSWELL and Solomon STEGALL, Executors of this my last Will and Testament. In witness whereof, I the said Charles ARRINGTON, have to this my last will and testament set my hand and seal, the day and year above written. Charles HARRINGTON (Seal) My land and plantation whereon I now live, I desire at my wife's death or removal of the plantation to be sold and the money to be divided between my sons. Signed, sealed, published, declared by the said Charles HARRINGTON the testors as his last will and testament in the presents (sic) of us who were present at the time of signing and sealing the same. Bryant Lee, Richmond CROSWELL. Anson Court, July 1796))) I do hereby certify the fore going to be a true copy of the last will and testament of Charles HARRINGTON, deceased, as the same filed in the clerks office of this county. Test. W M Train D.C. [This signature hard to decipher.] [NOTE: This will was transcribed by Barbara Parsons <b p a r s o n s @ w o r l d n e t . a t t . n e t>.]

This is possibly the Charles HARRINGTON who was on the 1763 tax list of Anson County, North Carolina; and he may be the same as the Charles HARRINGTON who received, on 4 March 1775, a patent for 300 acres of land, on Goose Pond, in Anson County, North Carolina. He is listed in the United States Census of 1790 for Anson County, North Carolina as having two sons under sixteen years of age and four daughters.

The known children of Charles HARRINGTON and Permelia ("Bena") UNKNOWN are: William HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [M] [William HARRINGTON. from Franklin County, Tennessee sold land in Anson County, North Carolina per 1815 deed.]; George HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [M]; Nancy HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [F]: m. Richmond CROSSWELL, BY 1796 [This couple is said to be residing in Anson County, North Carolina in 1790 and 1800.]; Nelly HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [F]: m. <Joseph> HUDSON, BY 1796; Mary HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [F]: m. Solomon STEGALL, BY 1796 [This couple is said to be residing in Anson County, North Carolina in 1800.]; Charles HARRINGTON (Jr.) (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [M]; Sukey HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [F]; Whitmell (or Whitmill) HARRINGTON (?, Anson County, North Carolina - ?) [M]; and John HARRINGTON (ABT 1768, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 23 May 1835 and BY July 1835, Anson County, North Carolina) [M]: m. Penelope ("Penny") STREATER (ABT 1772, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [Penelope ("Penny") STREATER is said to have been residing in Anson County, North Carolina in 1840.]

  Will of John HARRINGTON, the son of Charles HARRINGTON, 23 May 1835, State of North Carolina, Anson County, pp. 51-52:
  I John ARRINGTON of the County of Anson, State of North Carolina being of sound and disposing mind & memory do this twenty third day of May in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred and thirty five publish and declare this to be my last will and testament in the manner following (to wit). Article 1. I give and bequeath unto my wife Penny ARRINGTON the tract of land whereon I now live for her enjoyment during her natural life time or widowhood and at the end of either I wish the said tract to be equally divided between my two youngest sons, James and Samuel to hold the same them and their heirs forever. Item 1. It is my desire and I direct that my last set of children have the privilege of living on and enjoying the said land until my youngest son Samuel arrives at the age of twenty-one, then to be subject to the contract of my wife during her natural life or widowhood as above named. Article 2. I direct my stock of cattle and hogs, be left on the land for the use of the family subject to the contract of my wife, provided should either of my daughters, Nancy and Penelope marry then I wish them to have a cow and calf each from my stock of cattle. Article 3. I give and bequeath to my oldest son, John, one dollar. Article 4. I give and bequeath to my son, Warren, one dollar. Article 5. I give and bequeath to my daughter, Anna {Harrington} LOWE, one dollar. Article 6. I give and bequeath to my daughter, Mary {Harrington} WRIGHT, one dollar. Article 7. I give and bequeath to my son, Benjamin, one dollar. Article 8. I give and bequeath to my son, Travis, one dollar. Article 9. I give and bequeath to my son, Nelson, one dollar. Article 10. I give and bequeath to my daughter, Nancy, one dollar. Article 11. I give and bequeath to my daughter, Penelope one dollar. Lastly I name constitute and appoint my wife Penny ARRINGTON executrix, and my worthy friend P.W. Kittrell and James STREATER and my son Benjamin ARRINGTON, executor to this my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal day and date above named. Signed seal and delivered in the presence of May 23, 1835. John (X) ARRINGTON {Seal} Witness: Sheperd M. STREATER, Readick STREATER Anson County July Session 1835. Then this will was exhibited in open court and proven by Shepherd M. STREATER and Readick STREATER the subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. W. Dismukes Clerk, By U.D. Boggan D.C. [NOTE: This will was transcribed by Barbara Parsons <b p a r s o n s @ w o r l d n e t . a t t . n e t>.]

Note 3: Whitmell HARRINGTON, the husband of Frances SMITH, was residing in Anson County, North Carolina in 1763, as proven by the tax list. On 24 May 1773, he obtained a patent for land, in Anosn County, on the north side of Rocky River joining Bear Creek above the mouth of Stoney Creek. By Frances SMITH, Whitmell HARRINGTON engendered at least three children: Mary HARRINGTON (1770, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]; Whitmel HARRINGTON (1772, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M]; and John HARRINGTON (September 1774, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - ?).

   

____________________________
____________________________

G0496A: Elizabeth HARRINGTON [006]
Birth: ABT 1743, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America
Death: AFT 13 August 1812 and BEF 4 March 1816, Wilkes County, Georgia
Father: John HARRINGTON (ABT 1719, Chowan [later, Anson] County, North Carolina, British North America - 25 March 1748, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America)
Mother: Harriet HORN(E)

Marriage: ABT 1762
Spouse: Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) (ABT 1728, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - 3 October 1792, Phillips Mill, Wilkes County, Georgia) [See G0496A: Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.), in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]

Child 1: Joel PHILLIPS (Jr.) (ABT 1764, <Anson County>, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 1810 and BEF 1812, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Charity BRANTLEY, ABT 1785, Georgia

Child 2: William PHILLIPS (ABT 1765, <Anson County>, North Carolina, British North America - ABT 1796, Georgia) [M]: m. Piety UNKNOWN

Child 3: Sarah PHILLIPS (ABT 1766, <Anson County>, North Carolina - ?) [F]: m. Unknown POWELL

Child 4: Mary PHILLIPS (1767, <Anson County>, North Carolina, British North America - ABT 1852, Fayette County, Georgia) [F]: m. William ALLEN (ABT 1761, Virginia, British North America - 1816, Morgan County, Georgia), ABT 1788, <North Carolina> [See G0495A1: Mary PHILLIPS, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822) and G0495A: William ALLEN in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmill Phillips Allen (6 November 1811 - January 1868).]

Child 5: Whitmell PHILLIPS (ABT 1772, Wilkes County, Georgia, British North America - 1822, <Morgan County>, Georgia) [M]: m1. Nancy HURLEY (1779, Wilkes County, Georgia - ?), ABT 1791, Morgan County, Georgia: m2. Polly ROGERS [See G0495A2: Whitmell PHILLIPS, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]

Child 6: Zachariah PHILLIPS (ABT 1777, Wilkes County, Georgia - AFT 1826, Walton County, Georgia) [M]: m. Catherine CHAFFIN (ABT 1781, Wilkes County, Georgia - ABT 1842, Walton County, Georgia), 14 May 1799, Wilkes County, Georgia

Child 7: Elijah Leonard PHILLIPS (1780, Wilkes County, Georgia - ?) [M]: m. Tabitha WALKER (1789 - ?), 29 September 1805, Greene County, Georgia

Note 1: In 1761 Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) and his wife Elizabeth witnessed the sale of land in Anson County, North Carolina. In 1763, he and his wife sold land in Anson County. (Holcomb, Anson County: North Carolina Deed Abstracts, p.103) On 10 July 10 1771, Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) sold land in Anson County, North Carolina. (Abstract of Court Minutes)

It is possible that Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) was on the losing side in the 1771 Battle of Alamance, North Carolina between the Moderators and the Regulators, since many people left North Carolina following this battle.

On 27 September 1773, Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) is listed as receiving 200 acres of land ceded by the Creek and Cherokee Indians on Reedy Creek on the north side of Little River, in the area of present-day Wilkes County, Georgia. (Robert Scott Davis, Jr., The Wilkes County Papers: 1773-1833, p. 7; and Grace Gilliam Davison, Early Records of Wilkes County, Georgia, Vol. I, p. 6.) On 2 February 1778, he is listed as receiving 200 acres of land. (Robert Scott Davis, Jr., A Researcher's Library of Georgia History, Genealogy, and Records Sources, p. 78.)

In 1777, Joel Phillips's Fort, which was probably his fortified homestead, was identified. (Robert S. Davis, Jr., Georgia Citizens and Solders of the American Revolution, p. 164)

Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) fought in the Battle of Kettle Creek (near Washington), Georgia on 14 February 1779. Approximately 340 Georgia and South Carolina militiamen attacked a group of 600 loyalists from North and South Carolina who were camped at the creek. (Georgia Genealogical Magazine, 1981, no. 67, p. 41)

After their defeat at Augusta in the fall of 1780, Col. Elijah CLARKE led a band of refugees, including 400 women and children, from Wilkes County to the Watauga and Nolachucky river valley in Tennessee. Reportedly, they traveled two hundred miles in 11 days -- part of the journey without food. The route they took was probably past the site of present-day Asheville, North Carolina, and across Sam's Gap. (Samuel Cole Williams, Tennessee During the Revolutionary War, pp. 160-161; and "Colonel Elijah CLARKE in the Tennessee Country", Georgia Historical Quarterly, XXV, pp. 151-158) Because Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) was a member of the Refugee Regiment (Military Certificates of Georgia: 1776-1800), he and his family were almost certainly among these refugees.

The Phillips Mill Baptist Church was organized in the mill of Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) in 1785. He gave land for the church site. The church was moved to a new site four miles from the original site, but the mill stones from his mill are still at the church (1989). (History of Phillips Mill Baptist Church) [See Phillips Mill Baptist Church: The Bequest of Joel Phillips, Sr. (ABT 1728 - 3 October 1792).]

In 1790, Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) was listed as owning 830 acres of land in Captain William Hurley's District (N) of Wilkes County. (Frank Parker Hudson, A 1790 Census for Wilkes County, Georgia, p. 94)

Note 2: Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) was listed under the command of Capt. John Montgomery in the Chatham County, North Carolina Regimental Return of 23 September 1772.

List of Capt. John Montgomery - List No. 7

  John Montgomery, Capt.
Sergeants:
Sam'l Temple
Will'm. Caps
Will'm. PHILLIPS
--------------------------------------------------
Corporals:
David Loughorn
Lindsey Bell
Thos. Mills
---------------------------------------------------
Benjamin Cooper
Willm. Morris
John Davis
James Christian
Adam Keeling
Samuel Taylor
Owen Doud
Stephan Powel
John Brown
Willm. _ ? Pegram?
Willm. Dye
David Green
Charles Miles
Willm. Miles
Daniel Hearn
Willm. Barber, Senr.
John Bryan
Nathan Bryan
Richard Barber
Thos. Rand
Anthony Fisher
Willm. Duncan
George Nelson
Jeremiah PHILLIPS
Joel PHILLIPS
Lewis PHILLIPS
Willm. PHILLIPS
Willm. Hunphreys
Absolom Bryan
Peter Garret
Willm. Piercey
Francis Grubb
John Poplin
James Brown
Daniel Ford
James Willet
------------------------No. 44

Note 3: Elizabeth HARRINGTON signed her Will on 13 August 1812; and the document was proved in Wilkes County, Georgia on 4 March 1816. Her estate was to be divided equally between three sons, Whitmell PHILLIPS, Zachariah PHILLIPS, and Elijah PHILLIPS, and two daughters, Mary ALLEN and Sarah POWELL. She mentions the heirs of her deceased son, Joel PHILLIPS, Jr., and her granddaughter Polly HACKNEY, daughter of William PHILLIPS.

Also see Grace Gillam Davidson, Early Records of Georgia, page 88: "PHILLIPS, ELIZABETH. All estate real and personal to be equally divided between my three sons, Whitmell, Zacharias and Elijah and my two daughters Mary ALLEN and SARAH POWELL, and granddaughter Polly HACKNEY, daughter of William PHILLIPS, deceased and the heirs of Joel PHILLIPS, deceased. Signed August 13, 1812. Probated March 4, 1816. James LEE, John LEE and John LEE SR., Test."

Note 4: The estate of William PHILLIPS entered probate in Wilkes County, Georgia on 7 January 1795. By his wife, Piety BRANTLEY, whose relationship to Charity BRANTLEY, the wife of Joel PHILLIPS, Jr. is not known. William PHILLIPS seems to have engendered a daughter, Mary ("Polly") Harris PHILLIPS. John OGLETREE, Sr. and his wife, Ann DUNCAN, were appointed to be the guardians of Mary ("Polly") Harris PHILLIPS.

Mary ("Polly") Harris PHILLIPS, who died after 1820, perhaps in Wilkes County, Georgia, was married on 16 February 1809, in Wilkes County, Georgia, to Joseph P. HACKNEY (BEF 1792, <Wilkes County>, Georgia - AFT 1832, <Wilkes County>, Georgia).

At some time between 7 January 1795 and 11 September 1796, Ann DUNCAN, born about 1740 in Virginia, died and Piety BRANTLEY married John OGLETREE, Sr. (ABT 1735, Hanover County, Virginia, British North America - 3 August 1822, Wilkes County, Georgia). John OGLETREE, Sr. was the son of William OGLETREE (ABT 1710, Hanover County, Virginia, British North America - ?) and Unknown UNKNOWN. Ann DUNCAN was the daughter of Miles DUNCAN (ABT 1710, Sussex County, Virginia, British North America - 1791, Wilkes County, Georgia) and Ann UNKNOWN. John OGLETREE, Sr. and Ann DUNCAN were married in Virginia in 1759.

The offspring of Piety BRANTLEY and John OGLETREE, Sr. were: Edmond OGLETREE (11 September 1796, Wilkes County, Georgia - 1868, Rusk County, Texas) [M]: m. Martha ("Patsy") SANDERS, 22 June 1815, Wilkes County, Georgia; and Patsy Brantley OGLETREE (1798, Wilkes County, Georgia - ABT 1830) [F]: m. James HACKNEY, 3 October 1816, Wilkes County, Georgia [by license issued 2 October 1816; marriage performed by William Simpson, Justice of the Peace].

The relation of James HACKNEY, the husband of Patsy Brantley OGLETREE, to Joseph P. HACKNEY, the husband of Mary ("Polly") Harris PHILLIPS is not known.

The offspring of John OGLETREE, Sr. and Ann DUNCAN were: David OGLETREE (ABT 1760, Caswell County, North Carolina, British North America - November 1822, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Rebecca TURNER (1768, Pittsylvania County, Virginia, British North America - 22 April 1824, Wilkes County, Georgia), 1786, Wilkes County, Georgia; William OGLETREE (18 January 1765, Dinwiddie County, Virginia, British North - 29 August 1835, Monroe County, Georgia) [M]: m. Mary ("Polly") BIRD (18 March 1769, Middlesex County, Virginia, British North America - 25 May 1830, Monroe County, Georgia), 1785, Wilkes County, Georgia; John OGLETREE, Jr. (ABT 1766 - 24 July 1822, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Eleanor GRAY, 1797, Wilkes County, Georgia; Littleton OGLETREE (1767, Hanover County, Virginia, British North America - ABT 1842, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Sarah UNKNOWN, 1805; Wilkes County, Georgia; Claiborn OGLETREE (1768 - ?) [M]: m. Elizabeth GIBSON; Wiley OGLETREE (1773 - 1840, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Nancy UNKNOWN, 1791, Wilkes County, Georgia; Absalom OGLETREE (1772 - 1840, Wilkes County, Georgia) [M]: m. Martha A. E. HARPER; and Nancy OGLETREE (1775 - 1823, Wilkes County, Georgia) [F]: m. Chester RAY, 1803, Wilkes County, Georgia.

Note 5: Although Mary PHILLIPS listed her place of birth as North Carolina in the United States Census of Fayette County, Georgia for 1850, her son, Thomas V. ALLEN, identified his mother and his father as both born in Virginia in the 1880 Census of Morgan County. [See United States Census, Morgan County, Georgia, 1880, p.322A] It is from the census for 1850 that Mary PHILLIPS’s year of birth is known to be 1767. She was the daughter of Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) (BEF 1738, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - 3 October 1792, Phillips Mill, Wilkes County, Georgia) and Elizabeth HARRINGTON (ABT 1730, Anson County, North Carolina, British North America - AFT 1812 and BY 1816, Wilkes County, Georgia) who were married, probably in Georgia, about 1748. Elizabeth HARRINGTON was the daughter of John HARRINGTON and Mary UNKNOWN; and she was the first cousin of Hannah HARRINGTON, the wife of Col. Elijah CLARKE. [See above G0498A: Thomas HARRINGTON (Sr.), note 6.] Because Joel PHILLIPS (Sr.) was the grandfather in common of both George ALLEN and Temperance PHILLIPS, they were first cousins.

Note 6: Catherine CHAFFIN was the daughter of Isham CHAFIN (BEF 1760, <Charlotte County>, Virginia, British North America - 23 May 1822, Wilkes County, Georgia) and Elizabeth ("Betsy") BIRD (BEF 1760, <Prince Edward County>, Virginia, British North America - ?) who were married 18 December 1778, in Prince Edward County, Virginia.

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Joseph Edward Lake

At the age of twenty, Joseph Edward Lake became one of the youngest persons to be employed as a Foreign Service Officer of the United States government. During his 35-year career in the State Department, Lake served as ambassador to Albania and Mongolia, deputy assistant secretary of state for information management, director of the State Department’s crisis management center and adviser to the U.S. delegation to the United Nations. Lake spent ten years in East Asia, six years in West Africa and five years in the Balkans.

   

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RETURN: Phillips Mill Baptist Church: The Bequest of Joel Phillips, Sr. (ABT 1728 - 3 October 1792)

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