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GENEALOGICAL NOTES AND ANECDOTES

   

ANTECEDENTS and DESCENDANTS
of
REV. ISAAC HARVEY, SR.
(1786 - 16 September 1838)

   

G0496A: John HARVEY (Sr.) [006]
Birth: EST 1720, <Virginia?>, British North America
Death: AFT 19 December 1771, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America

Marriage: ABT 1740
Spouse: Mary UNKNOWN

Child 1: William HARVEY (ABT 1745, Virginia, British North America - AFT 1 December 1787 and BEF 14 January 1788, Edgefield County, South Carolina) [M]: m1. Verlinda <WADE?>: m2. Elizabeth JAMESON

Child 2: Rev. John HARVEY (Jr.) (ABT 1749/50, <Brunswick, Lunenburg, or Bedford County>, Virginia, British North America - 1823, Clarke County, Georgia) [M]: m. Margaret JONES (EST 1752, South Carolina or Georgia, British North America - 10 February 1801, Georgia), ABT 1769/70, <Washington County>, Georgia, British North America [See G0495A: Margaret JONES, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Jones (BEF 25 February 1718 - December 1755/56).]

Child 3: Thomas HARVEY (ABT 1750, Lunenburg County, Virginia, British North America - 1791 to BEF 29 February 1792, Greene County, Georgia, British North America) [M]: m. Rachel JONES (ABT 1754, <Washington County>, Georgia, British North America - 1802, Hancock County, Georgia) [See G0495B: Rachel JONES, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Jones (BEF 25 February 1718 - December 1755/56).]

Child 4: Evan HARVEY (ABT 1753, <Bedford County>, Virginia, British North America - 9 October 1812, Putnam County, Georgia) [M]: m1. Charity POWELL (ABT 1756 - 8 January 1798, Hancock County, Georgia), 3 March 1774, St. Paul's Parish, Richmond County, Georgia, British North America: m2. Ursula JACKSON (11 January 1772 - AFT 1850, Jasper County, Georgia), 10 December 1779, Hancock County, Georgia

Child 5: James HARVEY (ABT 1755, Virginia or South Carolina, British North America - AFT 16 January 1807, Hancock County, Georgia) [M]: m. Sarah CLARKE (died 1813), BEF 1786

Child 6: Michael HARVEY (1757, <Craven County>, South Carolina, British North America - 30 March 1810, Baldwin County, Georgia) [M]: m. Rebecca HAWKINS

Child 7: Richard HARVEY (EST 1759, <Craven County>, South Carolina, British North America - BY 3 October 1782, Richmond County, Georgia) [M]: m. Mary Catherine UNKNOWN

Note 1: In 1742, John HARVEY (Sr.) obtained a patent for land in Brunswick County, Virginia (Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 20, p. 426, Virginia land patents). In 1749, he was granted land in Lunenburg County, Virginia, Deed Book 29, p.91). [Lunenburg County was formed from Brunswick County in 1746, making it unlikely that John Harvey (Sr.) actually changed residence.] In 1756, in Bedford County, Virginia, he obtained a grant of land (Bedford County, Virginia, Deed Book 32, page 668). [Bedford County was formed from Lunenburg County, by act of law in November 1753, to take effect on 10 May 1754, again, making it unlikely that John HARVEY (Sr.) actually changed residence.] In South Carolina, on 9 January 1752, John HARVEY (Sr.) obtained a grant of land in Craven County, South Carolina and it seems that that he and his wife moved to Craven County around 1755 or 1756. [Craven County was created in 1683 and legally discontinued in 1769.] In 1767, John HARVEY (Sr.) and his wife moved to Granville (after 1769, Edgefield) County, South Carolina.1 After the death of John HARVEY (Sr.), his widow married William MANER. She was again widowed in 1774.

  Editorial Note:
  1. Granville County was discontinued in 1769. The portion of Granville County in which John HARVEY, Sr. resided was constituted in Ninety Six District until its incorporation as Edgefield County in 1785.

In 1752, John HARVEY, Sr. and Pinkethman HAWKINS are both included in the list of tithes for Lunenburg County, Virginia:

  Lunenburg County, Virginia - "Sunlight on the Southside," transcribed by Thomas Walter Duda.
   
  Chapter III: Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia: 1752, 1764, 1769, p. 183:
   
  For 1752

List taken by William Caldwell

  Thomas HARVEY's list

John HARVEY: Tithes = 6

Chapter III: Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg County, Virginia: 1752, 1764, 1769, p. 192:

  For 1752

List taken by Field Jefferson

  Pinkethman HAWKINS: Tithes = 1

Note 2: By his first wife, Verlinda <WADE?>, it seems that William HARVEY engendered: Zephaniah HARVEY (ABT 1765, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - 1832) [M]: m. Nancy SMITH; Nehemiah HARVEY (EST 1767/80, Edgefield County, South Carolina - ?, Washington Parish, Louisiana) [M]: m. Sarah ARD, 1816, Marion County, Mississippi; John Wade HARVEY (24 September 1766, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - 24 September 1845, Attala County, Mississippi)[M]: m. Rebecca HARVEY (ABT 1785, Edgefield County, South Carolina - ?), AFT 28 May 1803 [See below, G0495B: Thomas HARVEY, Child 8: Rebecca HARVEY.]; Elizabeth HARVEY (EST 1767/75, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]; Mary Ann HARVEY (EST 1767/75, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - AFT 10 January 1801) [F]: m. Hilleary PHILLIPS (ABT 1750, Georgia - AFT 10 January 1801) [See G0497A: William PHILLIPS (Jr.), note 1, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]; William HARVEY (EST 1780, Edgefield County, South Carolina - ?, Scott County, Mississippi) [M]: m. Sarah UNKNOWN; Thomas HARVEY (ABT 1780, Edgefield County, South Carolina - ABT 1840, Smith County, Mississippi) [M]: m. Unknown UNKNOWN (died BEF 1830); Eleanor (Elender) HARVEY (EST 1767/80, Edgefield County, South Carolina -?) [F]; and Verlinda ("Lincy") HARVEY (EST 1767/80, Edgefield County, South Carolina - 1841) [F]: m. Rev. Cyrus WHITE (died 1848).

By his second wife, Elizabeth JAMESON, who was the widow of Micajah ANDREWS whom she married 26 January 1763, it seems that William HARVEY engendered Martha HARVEY (EST 1781, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Lewis BYNE, 31 May 1796, Columbia County, Georgia; Mary HARVEY (17 November 1782, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Leonard SIMS, 25 March 1800, Columbia County, Georgia; and James HARVEY [M].

In most HARVEY records, the name of Mary Ann HARVEY is given only as "Ann." There are reports of her being married to Hilleary PHILLIPS and, indeed, the descendants of Hilleary PHILLIPS have preserved her name as "Mary Ann HARVEY." A child of Hilleary PHILLIPS and Mary Ann HARVEY was Littleberry Bostick PHILLIPS (10 January 1801, Georgia - 17 June 1874, Panola County, Texas: interment at Bethlehem Cemetery, Panola County, Texas) who, on 19 November 1820, at Jasper County, Georgia, was married to Elizabeth SMITH. Of this marriage, Peter Sanford PHILLIPS, M. D. (8 April 1835, Georgia - 15 June 1872, Panola County, Texas: interment at Bethlehem Cemetery, Panola County, Texas) was a son who, on 22 May 1860, married Rhoda Ann MAY (1844 - 1920), the daughter of William MAY (1811 - 1860) and Elizabeth JENNINGS (1814 - 1866). By his marriage to Rhoda Ann MAY, Peter Sanford PHILLIPS engendered: William B. PHILLIPS (1861 - 1863) [M]; Queen PHILLIPS (31 March 1863, Alabama - 25 August 1867, Panola County, Texas: interment at Bethlehem Cemetery, Panola County, Texas) [F]; John Wesley PHILLIPS (1865 - 1925) [M]; Bobbie May PHILLIPS (1867 - 1923) [F]; James Sanford PHILLIPS (1870 - 1934) [M], and Joseph Edgar PHILLIPS, M. D. (1872 - 1929) [M]. From Georgia, Peter Sanford PHILLIPS and Rhoda Ann MAY moved to Panola County, Texas. Rhoda Ann MAY was second married to John Henry ROSS (1829 - 1885), son of Edward ROSS and Elizabeth J. BUTLER, and engendered Mary Elizabeth ROSS (1878 - 1895) and Augustus H. ROSS (1880 - 1881). [See Panola County Historical and Genealogical Association, History of Panola County (Carthage, Texas); and see G0497A: William PHILLIPS (Jr.), note 1, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]

The Bethlehem Cemetery, in Panola County, is located six miles southwest from Carthage, Texas on Hwy 315 to County Road 106, then left to County Road 108. This area is known as the Snap Community.

This cemetery was established prior to 1875 on land deeded by W. R. Page. Several generations of early Panola County families are buried here. This is also the site of Bethlehem Methodist Church officially established in 1875 by the East Texas Conference San Augustine District with J. C. A. Bridges, Pastor and J. R. Bellamy presiding Elder, there having been a log church here for many decades, it was a place of worship for persons of all faiths for many years prior to 1875 until 1885. (American Revolution Bicentennial Medallion 1776-1976). The earliest recorded burial is that of Queen PHILLIPS.

The Will of William HARVEY exists in two states: The first is the archetype, dated 1 December 1787, which appears to be in the hand of Hugh Middleton to whom, as it also appears, William HARVEY dictated its essential contents. The archetype, that is, Middleton's holograph, was signed by William HARVEY. This is the document which, in court, Hugh Middleton proved by oath on 15 October 1788. The second is the proof-text which, on or before 15 October 1788, was copied from the archetype by the clerk of court for Edgefield County, South Carolina and which is recorded in Will Book A, pages 5 and 6. The recension given below is a transcription of the archetype which has been collated with the proof-text:

  [Page 1] I, William Harvey1, now2 being in my perfect senses and memory but weak in body3 and knowing that I must, as being mortal, depart this life and having assurance and firm hope that my body will, at the resurrection, arise and body and soul4 be reunited: And first in the name of God Amen, I give and bequeath my soul to God that gave it me. And I do leave my well beloved wife, Elizabeth5, and Hilliry Philips6, Zaphaniah7 Harvey my Executors. First I will and bequeath to my wife, Elizabeth Harvey, a wench8 called Jane, during her natural9 life. And after her decease to be with her the said Jane and all her increase to be equally divided between Martha10, Mary & James Harvey11 my loving daughters12 and son: I also give to my wife her bed and furniture that she lyes in13 and the chest. I give Dick14 to her also but she the said Elizabeth is to pay of the heirs of Micajah Andrews what is acoming15 to them and to each of them: And I give the sorrel mare called hers and the saddle and one hundred bushels of corn and all her crockery16 ware and her and her children to have an equal part of all the hogs and cattle to be divided between Zaphaniah Harvey, John and William, Nehemiah, Thomas, Elender & Lincy, my loving wife sons and daughters17. And also I give to my wife one pot known to be hers formerly, And the bed called Salley’s18 I give to Sarah Andrews19. And to my wife I give one plow and 2 hoes: Item20 three sheep: Secondly I give to my son Zapheniah, one negroe boy called Joe. And all my lands to be equally divided between my sons Zapheniah, William, John, Nehemiah, Thomas & James Harveys: Thirdly I leave it to the discretion of my Executors to sell and dispose of my lands to the best advantage and divide the money as above mentioned, each his part equally.

[Page 2] Fourthly, I give and bequeath to my son, William, my young bay mare I had of Patterson and all my wearing apparel. Fifthly, I give to my daughter, Elander, one Negroe girl name Rose & bed21. Sixthly, I bequeath to my son, John, a young mare Proqick. To my sons I give equally to be divided Vine and Beck22 to wit each his part, William, John, Nehemiah and Thomas. I give to my daughter, Lincy23, a negroe boy, Peter, a bed and furniture. I give to my sons Nehemiah and Thomas my big sorrel mare24 and all her increase. I lastly give to my sons all my household furniture, work tools25 &c. that aint26 been before mentioned: And what Debts I owe I desire that it may be discharged out of my stock of cattle and hogs & I desire that my two daughters, Ann and Elizabeth, each to have five shillings sterling to be paid by my Executors when demanded. Signed Sealed and delivered

In the presence of
us This 1st day of December 1787
/s/ Hugh Middleton
/s/ Lucy Middleton
}
} /s/ William Harvey
}
}

Notes:

1. William Harvey: William HARVEY died between 1 December 1787, the date of his Will, and 14 January 1788 when his widow, Elizabeth, qualified in court as executrix of his estate.

2. now: In the archetype, this appears as know.

3. body: In the archetype, body is spelled as boddy.

4. soul: In the archetype, soul is spelled as sole.

5. Elizabeth: This was Elizabeth JAMESON, the second wife of William HARVEY, and previously the wife of Micajah ANDREWS.

6. Hilliry Philips: This was Hilleary PHILLIPS, the son of John PHILIPS (ABT 1726, Surry County, Virginia, British North America - 28 March 1784, Wilkes County, Georgia) and Ruth BEALL (ABT 1712, Prince George's County, Maryland, British North America - 1777, Richmond County, Georgia). By his descendants, he is recorded as the husband of Mary Ann HARVEY, the daughter of William HARVEY and Verlinda <WADE?>. [See G0497A: William PHILLIPS (Jr.), note 1, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822) and see below, note 6, on Margaret and Rachel JONES.]

7. Zaphaniah: This is difficult to make out in the archetype. The proof-text reads Zachariah.

8. wench: That is, a female household slave. About Jane, see immeditely below, the indenture of Elizabeth Walker to Sims & Byne, 22 September 1807.

9. natural: In the archetype, natural is spelled as natrel.

10. Martha: In the archetype, the pointed ligature connecting the letters a and t justifies the reading of this as Marthew. In the proof-text, the name is given as Mathew. Subsequent court-documents show that Martha is, in fact, the proper reading. To confirm the name Martha, see immediately below, the indenture of Elizabeth Walker to Sims & Byne, 22 September 1807.

11. Martha, Mary & James Harvey: These three persons were the offspring of William HARVEY and his second wife, Elizabeth JAMESON.

12. daughters: In both the archetype and the proof-text, this is plural. And it demonstrates that Marthew or Mathew must be read as Martha.

13. in: The proof-text reads this as on.

14. Dick: Dick, a slave, was brought into this estate by Elizabeth JAMESON upon her marriage to William HARVEY.

15. acoming: This is an American vulgar error for coming. In the proof-text, the copyist, who wrote coming, added the letter a interlinearly.

16. crockery: In the archetype, this is spelled as crokery.

17. Zaphaniah Harvey, John and William, Nehemiah, Thomas, Elender & Lincy, my loving wife sons and daughters: These were the offspring of William HARVEY and his first wife, Verlinda <WADE?>.

18. Salley’s: Only the termination of this name is legible in the archetype. The proof-text supplies it completely. Salley was Sarah ANDREWS.

19. Sarah Andrews: In both the archetype and the proof-text, Andrews is given as Andres. Sarah ANDREWS was the daughter of Elizabeth JAMESON and her first husband, Micajah ANDREWS.

20. Item: Persons unfamiliar with Romance languages should understand that the word item is Latin and that it means "also." With that meaning, it is freqently encountered in the legal Latin of testaments and inventories.

21: & bed: In the archetype, this is an interlinear addition.

22. Vine and Beck: Vine and Beck were the slaves of William HARVEY.

23. Lincy: This was Verlinda HARVEY, named after her mother, Verlinda <WADE?>.

24. my big sorrel mare: In the archetype, this is difficult to make out. The proof-text supplies the reading.

25: work tools: The proof-text supplies this as my work tools.

26. aint: This is an Anglo-American vulgar error.

After the death of William HARVEY, Elizabeth JAMESON married David WALKER as is shown by the following indenture:

  ELIZABETH WALKER TO SIMS & BYNE: Deed Recorded 22 September 1807

----------- This Indenture --------- --------- To All to Whome these presents Shall Come Greeting Know ye that I Elizabeth WALKER of the County of Columbia, late Widow of William HARVEY, of the State of South Carolina for and in Consideration of the nautral love and affection which I have and bear unto my daughter Martha, late Martha HARVEY, and now the wife of Lewis BYNE of Burke County and of the natural love and affection which I have and bear unto my Daughter Mary, late Mary HARVEY, and now the wife of Leonard SIMS of Baldwin County and also for and in Consideration of the sum of ----- freely[?] to me in hand paid by the said Martha BYNE & Mary SIMS the right whereof I ------ ------ is hereby acknowledged have given transferred and delivered and by these presents do freely give transfer and -------- unto the said Marthy BYNE and Mary SIMS a Certain negro woman Slave named Jane and her Childron named Cloe Rose Sylvia Pat Peter Jacob Bob Judy Stephen Billy & John and Se---y a Child of Rose and Jeƒsee a Child of Sylvia to hold the said negro Slaves and every of them with ---- future ---- of the family unto my said Daughters Martha and Mary and their heirs Sarre and Share alike free and Clear of the life Estate which I therefore have had and held in the said Negros under and by Virt--- of the last Will and testament of said William HARVEY dec'd In Witneƒs Whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal the 26th day of August 1807 Elizabeth WALKER {Seal} In presence of Abner SIMS A Crawford

Note 3: Richard HARVEY, like his brothers, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. The following paragraphs are taken from William and Irma Lampton, Partial History of the Harvey Family (1992), p. 5, based on the researches of Ralph Ferguson Harvey (2 June 1919, Alabama - 25 September 1989, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas).

  Extract from the Will of Richard HARVEY, written in Richmond County, Georgia, 1781:

FIRST I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Mary HARVEY my negro boy called Ned and my negro wench called Fan and all the cattle I had with her and likewise all my household goods and furniture.

SECOND I give and bequeath unto the child that my wife is now bigg with when born my other two boys, one called York the other Nathan, but if the child dyes before he comes of age to enjoye them I give York to my brother Thomas HARVEY and Nathan to my brother Michael’s son Richard and all my horses and cattle to pay my debts etc. etc.

On October 3, 1782 the appraisers of the goods of Richard HARVEY were appointed as follows: Evan HARVEY, James ORRICK, William SHIELDS, Hezekiah BUSSEY, Benj. SCOTT, and James HARVEY.

This record firmly establishes that Richard, Thomas, and Michael HARVEY were brothers and the appointment of Evan and James as appraisers would prove that they were in the same area and were probably related.

The child with whom Richard HARVEY's wife, Mary Catherine, was "now bigg" was James HARVEY, the only known offspring of this marriage.

Note 4: John HARVEY (Jr.) was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. He was, by profession, a Baptist minister. He was, in 1785, residing in Wilkes County, Georgia.

Note 5: Thomas HARVEY, in 1785, was residing in Wilkes County, Georgia. He was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. There is record, dated 2 October 1784, of his authorization to receive pay for service in the regiment of Colonel Samuel Hammond. Previous to the War, in 1765, he had obtained grants of land in South Carolina. For the terminus ad quem of his date of death (29 February 1792), see (1) Court of Greene County, Georgia, 3 April 1792, Letters of Administration for the Estate of Thomas Harvey, in the DAR Library, Washington, D. C. and (2) Bienville Parish Historical Society, History of Bienville Parish, p. 134, in the Jackson Parish Library, Jonesboro, Louisiana. Certainly, at the beginning of 1779, he was residing in Hancock County, Georgia.

Note 6: Margaret and Rachel JONES were sisters, the daughters of Michael JONES (BEF 25 February 1718, Prince George County, Maryland, British North America - December 1755/56) and Ruth BEALL (ABT 1717, Maryland, British North America - 1777, Richmond County, Georgia). [See G0496A: Ruth BEALL, in Antecedents and Descendants of Thomas Beall of Loving Acquaintance (ABT 1631 - AFT November 1732).]

Note 7: During the Revolutionary War, Evan HARVEY was serving in the South Carolina militia before the fall of Charleston. And he was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. He obtained a grant of land in Washington County, Georgia and, in 1785, was residing in Wilkes County, Georgia. Evidence of his military service may be found in: (1) Audited Accounts in the South Carolina Archives, T374 and (2) Mrs. Howard H. McCall, Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia and Other States, Vol III, p. 53, Genealogical Publishing Co, 1968. Charity POWELL was the daughter of Moses POWELL and Mary WILLIAMS.

Note 8: James HARVEY was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. His wife, Sarah CLARKE, was the daughter of John CLARK(E) and Judith MALLETT.

Note 9: Michael HARVEY was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. He was, in 1785, residing in Wilkes County, Georgia. He lies interred in the Harvey Family Cemetery, Baldwin County, Georgia. His tombstone is inscribed: Michael Harvey || Revolutionary War Soldier || Georgia Troops. Rebecca HAWKINS, his wife, was the daughter of Pinkethman HAWKINS.

[Image Credit: Mr. Alton L. Harvey]

  To reach the Harvey Family Cemetery, from the Baldwin County Courthouse, go west on Hancock Street for 2 blocks or 0.2 mile (or the one large block containing Georgia College & State University). Turn right on Clarke Street. Go one large block or 0.2 mile. Turn left onto Business Highway 441 North (Montgomery St.) and follow the signs for Business 441 N (turn right on North Columbia St.). Go approximately 7-1/2 miles. Turn left at Meriwether Rd. About 2.8 miles further (about 2 blocks past Georgia Power overhead lines) turn right onto Forte Dr. where Meriwether Road curves left. If Forte divides, stay to the left. Michel HARVEY's marker is just past the divide and 0.3 mile from the Meriwether and Forte Dr. intersection, on the left, about 15 feet from the road.

Michael HARVEY is found listed in the inventories of Baldwin County, Georgia for 1810. These inventories are to be found in the following record books in the County Courthouse in Milledgeville and on microfilm at the Georgia State Archives in Atlanta: Baldwin County Court of Ordinary, Inventories & Appraisments, 1807-1816; Baldwin County Court of Ordinary, Inventories & Appraisments, 1816-1827 (there is a second inventory book dated 1812-1827 which is in much better condition, but does not contain all of these inventories); Baldwin County Court of Ordinary, Inventories & Appraisments, 1827-1850; Baldwin County Court of Ordinary, Inventories & Appraisements, Book C, 1850-1873.

In 1810, Michael HARVEY, in Baldwin County, is listed as the owner of 18 slaves, a shotgun, a coffee-mill valued at $3, and one lot of books valued at $2.

Michael HARVEY's Will, proved 4 June 1810 in Hancock County, Georgia, is dated 10 March 1810. In this document, he mentioned his wife Rebecca, his children William HARVEY, Stephen HARVEY, Michael HARVEY, Pinkey HARVEY, Elizabeth HOWELL, Martha HARVEY, Polly HARVEY, Rachel HARVEY, and Sally BARKSDALE. Others named in the document are Joseph ANDREWS, Rene FITZPATRICK, and John VANS. [See Baldwin County, Georgia, Will Book A, 1807 - 1832.]

Note 10: The known children of Michael HARVEY and Rebecca HAWKINS were: Elizabeth HARVEY [F]: m. Unknown HOWELL; Martha HARVEY [F]; Polly HARVEY [F]; Rachel HARVEY [F]: m. Unknown HARVEY; Stephen HARVEY [M]: m. Ann ("Annie") BARKSDALE (1786, Virginia - ?), 14 October 1819, Baldwin County, Georgia; William HARVEY [M]; Michael HARVEY (Jr.) [M]: m. Mary ("Polly") CLOWER (1772 - 1855), 30 July 1796, Warren County, Georgia; Pinkethman ("Pinkney," "Pinkey") HARVEY (22 October 1778 - October 1803, Warren County, Georgia) [M]: m1. Nancy BARKSDALE (ABT 1783, Virginia - 21 July 1826); m2. Charlotte TILLERY, 11 June 1829; Sarah ("Sally") HARVEY (ABT 12 May 1788, Georgia - 16 February 1854, Talbot County, Georgia: interment at Barksdale Cemetery, south of Talboton, Talbot County, Georgia) [F]: m. Terrell BARKSDALE (1784, Charlotte County, Virginia - 1871, Talbot County, Georgia: interment at Barksdale Cemetery, south of Talboton, Talbot County, Georgia), 8 March 1810, Baldwin County, Georgia.

Ann ("Annie") BARKSDALE, the wife of Stephen JARVEY, Nancy BARKSDALE, the wife of Pinkethman ("Pinkney," "Pinkey") HARVEY, and Terrell BARKSDALE, the husband of Sarah ("Sally") HARVEY, were siblings. They were the offspring of John BARKSDALE, a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War who died before 22 October 1803 in Warren County, Georgia, and Susannah BURNLEY who were married 21 February 1778 in Bedford County, Virginia.

That Rebecca HAWKINS is likely to have been the daughter of Pinkethman HAWKINS is indicated by the name of her son, Pinkethman HARVEY.

Matthew HAWKINS (ABT 1704, York County, Virginia, British North America - 2 July 1734, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America) was married, about 1725 in Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, to Sarah PINKETHMAN (born ABT 1704, York County, Virginia, British North America), the daughter of Timothy PINKETHMAN and Rebecca BASKERVILLE. Their known children are: Thomas HAWKINS (13 June 1725, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - AFT 14 November 1758 [Will signed] and BEF 1 May 1759[Will proved], Lunenburg County, Virginia, British North America) [M]: m. Mary HOWARD (daughter of Francis HOWARD and Diana UNKNOWN) (BEF 1739 - January 1787), 19 January 1753, Lunenburg County, Virginia, British North America; Martha HAWKINS (26 February 1725/26, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - ?) [F]; Pinkethman HAWKINS (27 February 1728/29, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - 1782, Abbeville County, South Carolina) [M]: m. Elizabeth UNKNOWN; William HAWKINS (1 March 1729/30, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - 12 March 1729/30, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America) [M]; and Rebecca HAWKINS (28 May 1732, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - ?) [F].

Pinkethman HAWKINS, by his wife Elizabeth, is definitely known to have engendered Thomas Pinkethman HAWKINS (1776, Johnston County, North Carolina - ABT 4 December 1837, Talladega County, Alabama) who married Lucy COLBERT (ABT 1778, North Carolina - ABT 16 July 1838, Talladega County, Alabama), the daughter of William COLBERT who seems to have died about 1797 in Hancock County, Georgia, and Miriam GREER, the daughter of John GREER who died in 1770 in Orange County, North Carolina.

Samuel HAWKINS, who was born in South Carolina in the mid-1700s and who, in the 1780s, married Susannah SLAUGHTER, may also have been a son of Pinkethman HAWKINS. Samuel HAWKINS died soon after signing his Will in Jones County, Georgia on 9 February 1816. Samuel HAWKINS engendered a son, Ezekiel HAWKINS (29 December 1790, Greene County, Georgia - 31 August 1868, Sumter County, Georgia) who, by his wife Nancy MCKAY (25 December 1796, Robeson County, North Carolina - 15 September 1861, Sumter County, Georgia, Confederate States of America) whom he married 2 November 1820 in Jones County, Georgia, engendered Pinkethman W. HAWKINS (27 September 1820, Jones County, Georgia - 31 December 1867, Sumter County, Georgia). Pinkethman W. HAWKINS, about 1839 in Jones County, Georgia married Stacy W. TINSLEY. The Will of Pinkethman W. HAWKINS was proved in Sumter County, Georgia on 3 November 1868.

  Will of Samuel HAWKINS:
   
  Georgia
Jones County

In the name of God amen. I Samuel HAWKINS being weak of body but of Sound mind and memory do make and constitute this my last will and desire that my executors hereafter named will have my body decently buried and that all my Just debts be (&) shall be discharged as soon as can be conveniently done and as it has pleased God to bless me with a portion of worldly wealth in this life now it is my will and desire that the same may be divided by my Executors in the following manner: for the great love and affection that I have for my loving wife Susannah HAWKINS, I do lend unto her during her natural life the following property viz Roger, Nead, Hage, Chana, Lilly, Ben, Abram, which Said seven negroes I lend unto my said wife during her life, and the land and plantation, all the household furniture, and kitchen furniture, one Still, two carts, one waggon, and all the Stock of each kind, and all the plantation tools, and all the provisions that may be at the time of my decease to be here or for the use of the family; and, after the death of my wife, it is my desire that my Son Stephen HAWKINS to have Silvy and her increase; and, after the death of my wife, it is my will and desire that my Son Stephen to have Ned and Abram and my Son Ezekiel HAWKINS to have Hager and Roger and my granddaughter Elizabeth HAWKINS CLARK to have Chana and Ben; and, in case the said Elizabeth HAWKINS CLARK should die before She Should arrive at the age of twenty one or without Issue, then it is my will and desire that the said negroes and their increase Should be Equally divided between my Son Ezekiel HAWKINS & Stephen HAWKINS; and, after the death of my Said wife, I do give the waggon unto my Son Ezekiel HAWKINS. I do desire that, after (the death) of my loving wife, that all the property I have loaned unto her except Such as I have willed away after her death to be Sold and an equal distribution of the amount thereof be equally divided between Ezekiel HAWKINS, Stephen HAWKINS, and the Said Elizabeth HAWKINS CLARK; and I do nominate and appoint Susannah HAWKINS my wife and Ezekiel HAWKINS my Son as Executors of this my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand this 9th day of February 1816.

/s/ Samuel HAWKINS

Signed in the presence of us

           his
William + Gray
          mark

Thomas Summons JP

       his
John + Gray
      mark

Georgia
Jones County

Came in open Court Thomas Summons being Sworn Saith that he was a Subscribing witness to the within will and Saw the testator sign the same and he was of sound mind and memory and he saw William Gray and John Gray Sign the Same as witnesses and they Signed in the presence of each other and in the presence of the testator.

Thomas Summons

A Carter Clk

   
  Will of Ezekiel HAWKINS:
   
  State of Georgia
Sumter County

I Ezekiel HAWKINS, being of advanced age & in feeble health, but of sound & disposing memory, do make & declare this as my last will and testament, hereby revoking former wills I may have made.

Item Second. I direct that my executor sell my property personal & real in such parcels publicly or privately, as in his judgment he may think best for the interest of the estate. When he has paid my debts, he will pay to Henry SHEFFIELD of Texas, husband of my daughter Amanda SHEFFIELD Five hundred Dollars, and to the children of my son William J. HAWKINS, also of Texas, Five Hundred Dollars. The money remaining in the hands of my executor after paying these legacies he will divide equally into seven parts & pay a share to each of my children living & a like share to the representative or representatives of such as may be dead.

Item Third. I appoint Samuel H. HAWKINS Executor of this my will, this the 19th of March 1866.

Daniel MCKAY               Ezekiel HAWKINS (Seal)
J.H. Markett

Signed sealed published & declared by the above named Ezekiel HAWKINS as his laast will & testament in presence of us, who at his request in presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses hereto.

Feby. 28th 1868

W.M. Granberry
F.A. Cowles
Wm. H. Brewer J. P.

State of Georgia
Sumter County

In person appeared before me James M. Stanford Ordinary of said county, W.M. Granberry & Wm. H. Brewer, who being duly sworn deposeth and saith that in said county on the 28th day of February 1868 deponents saw Ezekiel HAWKINS, then of said county, now deceased, sign, seal, publish & declare the within as his last will and testament, that he was not influenced to do so by any person whatever & was at the time of sound mind and memory. Deponents subscribed said will as witnesses in the presence of the Testator at his request and saw F. A. Cowles subscribe said will as witness at Testators request who saw Testator sign his name to said will. All the witnesses subscribed in the presence of Testator & of each other. Sworn to & subscribed before me October 5th 1868.

   
  Will of Pinkethman W. HAWKINS:
   
  State of Georgia
County of Sumter

I Pinkethman W. HAWKINS of the county and state aforesaid, being of sound and disposing mind, do make and declare this my last will and testament.

Item first. I direct that my just debts be paid as soon after my death as possible.

Item Second. I direct that my Executor take charge of my property & manage and control the same for the payment of my just debts & for the support and maintainance of my wife & minor children - the males until they arrive at the age of twenty one & the females until they marry keeping said property together until my youngest child arrives at age.

Item Third. My Executor is authorized publicly or privately at any time to dispose of any of my property in order to enable him to carry out the first & second items of this my will.

Item Fourth. I wish my Executor to dispose of a(s) little of my property as possible to carry out the first & second items of this my will & the balance of my property I wish kept together until my youngest child arrives of age & then I direct that the balance of my property be disposed of & the proceeds arising from same be divided equally between my wife and children then living, the representatives of children to take the place of the present in case of his death; provided Charles, M. D., and John M., & Wm. J. HAWKINS, shall receive less than the others Seventy Dollars each, which amount I have advanced to each of them in property.

Item Fifth. I nominate & appoint Samuel H. HAWKINS Executor of this my will.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & affixed my seal, this the 31st day of December 1867.

P.W. HAWKINS (L. S.)

Signed sealed and published as the last will & testament of P.W. HAWKINS, in presence of us who sign as witnesses at his request & in his presence.

Edward CLARK (L. S.)

F.M. Coker (L. S.)

William Coker J.P. (L. S.)

State of Georgia

In person appeared before James M. Stanford Sumter County Ordinary of said County Edward CLARK who being duly sworn deposeth and sayeth that in said county on the 31st day of December 1867 deponent saw P. W. HAWKINS then of said county now deceased sign, seal publish & declare the within as his last will and testament, that he was not influenced to do so by any person whatever & was at the time of sound mind and memory, deponent subscribed said will as a witness in the presence of the testator at his request and saw F. M. Coker and William Coker subscribe said will as witnesses at testators request who both saw testator sign his name to said will. All the witnesses subscribed in the presence of testator and of each other.

Edward CLARK

Sworn to & subscribed before me this the 3rd day of Novr 1868

J. M. Stanford Ordinary

Pinkethman HAWKINS (27 February 1728/29, Charles Parish, York County, Virginia, British North America - 1782, Abbeville County, South Carolina), in 1760, bought land from John Mathews of Craven County, South Carolina. Thus, the South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. IX, Summer 1981, No. 3, "Some Migrations from Virginia to South Carolina," p.144:

  Lunenburg Deed Book 8, p. 9: 9 January 1760:
   
  John Mathews Junr of the County of Cravin in the Province of South Carolina to Pinkethman HAWKINS of the Parish of Cumberland in the Countyof Lunenburg, for £ 30 Va. money…180 acres adj. Corees[?] corner, Marables line, on the N side of Tenewood[?] Creek …

About Pinkethman HAWKINS, the following material, from Maud Carter Clement, History of Pittsylvania County Virginia (Lynchburg, VA: J. P. Bell Co., 1929), which records an episode of 1757, is of interest

  CHAPTER VII. THE CHEROKEE WAR---WESTERN EXPLORATION, pp. 82-83:
   
  To give the particulars and cause of the second Engagement William Morgan, Pinkethman HAWKINS, Thomas Overstreet, and George Thomas were sworn.

Pinkethman HAWKINS on his Oath deposed, that being Ordered out by Colonel Talbot to join Captain Mead, to go in pursuit of the Enemy who had killed Hall, stole many Horses, Robbed and plundered many Families in Bedford and Halifax Countys, and was supposed to have killed or Captivated other Families who were then missing, in his March he fell upon the House of one Standiford (where he found one Byrd whose wife the Indians had taken and threatned to carry her away as a Squa, though she afterwards luckily made her escape, whilst the Enemy was Busy in plundering her Husbands House) and he found the House of Standiford strip of everything, the Bed Ticks ripped open and carryed away, and the feathers scattered all over the House, and the Family gone, whilst there he heard a hollowing and noise of Indians. Ordered his men then with him fifteen in Number to go with twenty five of the Inhabitants, who had collected themselves, and way lay the Indians at a pass he was advised by his Guide, they must go through, and extend a line along the Ridge by that pass as long as the number of men would admit of, and wait the coming of the Indians; for that he himself and another, namely one Tarbro, would go to the Indians (who by the noise he imagined was over the River not far of) and treat with them in a Friendly manner about the Prisoners and Plunder they had gott, and that he charged them, if they should see the Indians pass by with him a Prisoner, or, that they should hear of his death, or, if they should pass by with their Horses Packed, they might conclude his Treaty with them had proved ineffectual, and Ordered them if either of these things should happen, to treat the Indians (more especially as all along their March, they had declared themselves Shawanees), as Enemys, [p.83] and on the March of his men, in consequence of such Orders, He HAWKINS, with Tarbro, as was concerted proceeded forwards to treat with the Indians, that when they came to the River Eight or Ten Indians came over the River to them, that he endeavoured to come to terms with them, proposed peace and Friendship, and called them Brothers, they surlily answered, no, no, no Brothers, English damned Rogues, and clapping their Hands, on their Breasts called themselves, and making signs signifyed to them, there was a great many Shawanees all about them, that the wood and Mountains were full of them, that he still mentioned peace and told them that he and Tarbro were unarmed and came as Brothers, but the Indians not withstanding his mentions for peace, Striped him of his Coat, Waiscoat, Shirt, Shoes, Stockings, and Hatt, and gave him several Blows with their Tomhawks and ordered him away, he remembering that in his Breeches (which .was all the Coaths they had left him) he had about five shillings in Cash, gave it to one of the Indians, who thereupon returned him his Coat, upon which the Deponent HAWKINS thinking they were in a better humour, again proposed to treat with them, upon which they beat him and Tarbro very severely, and Cut him thro' the upper Lip with a Blow of a Scalping knife, led them both by the Hands up the River Banck and ordered them to run away or they would kill them, which Order they readily Obeyed, and being at two great a distance, and as they were bare footed did not come up with the men till the Battle with the Indians was over.

:It is sometimes thought that the posthumous child of Thomas HAWKINS, the brother of Pinkethman HAWKINS, was also named "Pinkethman." In Lunenburg County, Virginia, Thomas HAWKINS served in the vestry of Cumberland Parish from 1754 to 1758. Under Lyddal Bacon, from 1757 to 1759, he was deputy sherriff.

Thomas HAWKINS signed his Will on 14 November 1758:

  Lunenburg County, Virginia, Will Book I, p. 250:
   
  Thomas HAWKINS of L<unenburg>, being weak in body To my son Mathew - the plantation I now live on, containing all the lands I bought of William Thomason, James Parish, and John Clarke, except my wife to have her thirds of the same, during her life. To my son John - a plantation in North Carolina on Island Creek.

To John Clarke - 200 acres on Sandy Creek, when he makes my heir a right to the land I bought of him on the north side of Butchers Creek. The rest of my lands are to be sold, except the child that my wife is with, if a boy, then he should have the land in dispute between Stephen Collins, if I recover it. If not, I leave him 600 acres on Grassey Creek in Carolina. To my wife Mary - 6 Negroes, viz, Great Jemmy, Jack, Phill, Nanny, Bess, and Cate, during her life, and after her death, for my son Mathew to have them. To my son Mathew - Little Jimmy, Lucy, Jude, Little Moll. To my son John - Charles, George, and Little Nanny. To my daughter Sarah - Will, Laurence, and Soockey. To the child my wife is big with now - Tim, Frank, and Kezee. To John Petter - 30 £, to collect in my Sheriff's arrears. Executors - my brother Pink. HAWKINS and my wife Mary.

Signed Nov 14, 1758
Thomas HAWKINS.
Witnesses - Joseph Dobson, Joseph Rudd (X his mark), Mathew Turner, Martha Jarrot, Jacob Coleson (I his mark).

At May 1, 1759 Court, the within will of the deceased was exhibited by Mary HAWKINS and Pinkethman HAWKINS, the executrix and executor, and the same was proved by the oath of 2 of the witnesses, and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of said executrix and executor, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate of the will, whereupon they, together with Joseph Williams, Joseph Freeman, William Caldwell, Samuel Young, and James Easter, their securities, entered into [bond].

It does not appear that recovery was made of the land disputed with Stephen Collins. On 19 November 1757, Thomas HAWKINS obtained 600 acres of land on both sides of Grassy Creek, in North Carolina. This was the land which Thomas HAWKINS assigned to his unborn child, if male and if the land in dispute with Stephen Collins were recovered. But since, on 7 May 1762, Thomas HAWKINS's executors, Pinkethman HAWKINS, and John and Mary Potter, sold the land at Grassy Creek to Mamucan Hunt, as witnessed by Henry Howard, it seems either that the posthumous child of Thomas HAWKINS was not male or that the child did not survive.

Note 11: Because (1) Stephen HARVEY, a son of Michael HARVEY, was married to an Ann BARKSDALE, because (2) Pinkethman HARVEY, another son of Michael HARVEY, was married to Nancy BARKSDALE, and because (3) Sarah ("Sally") HARVEY, a daughter of Michael HARVEY, was married to Terrell BARKSDALE, it is of interest to note the marriage of a Thomas HARVEY (EST 1834 - AFT 9 April 1812 [Will signed] and BEF 6 July 1812 [Will proved], Charlotte County, Virginia) of Charlotte County, Virginia to a Macarina ("Macca") Andromache BARKSDALE (ABT 1748 - BEF 1812).

It is possible - but not now proven - that Macarina ("Macca") Andromache BARKSDALE was the daughter of Collier BARKSDALE and Sarah RANDOLPH and that her husband Thomas HARVEY, a blacksmith of Charlotte County, Virginia, was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth HARVEY of Charlotte County, Virginia.

Note 12: The following paragraphs are taken from William and Irma Lampton, Partial History of the Harvey Family (1992), pp. 1 - 4, based on the researches of Ralph Ferguson Harvey (2 June 1919, Alabama - 25 September 1989, Dallas County, Texas):

  This Harvey Family History begins with the first proven ancestor, John HARVEY. He was granted land in Brunswick County, Virginia in 1742. The Provincial Assembly of Virginia set aside several hundred thousand acres of land in the western part of Virginia in 1738. Brunswick County was formed in 1720 and went as far as Virginia went west.

The Assembly agreed anybody who would import themselves into the colony of Virginia would be exempt from all taxes for a period of 10 years from the date of the act of the legislature. Every one who came in there supposedly came from outside Virginia.

Lunenburg County, Virginia, was created in 1746 from part of Brunswick County; therefore, John HARVEY was now living in Lunenburg County. He was granted land in Lunenburg County in 1749. In 1750 he sold the land he was granted in 1742. This same land then being in Lunenburg and not Brunswick County. Bedford County was formed in 1753 from Lunenburg. The land he was granted in 1749 is now in Bedford County, Virginia.

When Bedford County was established in 1753, John HARVEY was appointed as an attorney at the first county court. This court was held in the home of Matthew TALBOT.1 This man later went to Georgia and was later governor there.2 Talbot County, Georgia, was named for him. Members of his family married members of John HARVEY’s family after they too went to Georgia.

There were two other men there at the same time he was who appeared to have been his brothers. One was a Quaker after he moved to North Carolina. His family Quaker records said there were three brothers, [including] William and Michael, who went to Anson County, North Carolina. The name of the county changed and they were living in Randolph County, North Carolina, when they died. The third, John, went to Georgia.

John HARVEY lived on the land granted him, or at least some of it, until January 1755, when he sold out and went to North Carolina.

He purchased some land, or at least a deed was recorded, in Anson County, North Carolina, April 1755. The border was disputed between North Carolina and South Carolina for many years. The land along the border would be in North Carolina at times and in South Carolina at other times. They could not agree on the border for a time. John and his wife, mary, remained there for several years. John signed his name to deeds there. Mary made her mark for her name on the deeds.

John and Mary HARVEY are later found in what is now Edgefield County, South Carolina. He first bought land from a man named Samuel FRY, a planter on Stephen’s Creek that was also called Noble’s Creek.3 He was later granted land on the same creek.

There was not any sort of law enforcement of any kind in South Carolina except in Charleston. They did not have any courts. They did not have any sheriffs. If you wanted to have anybody arrested, you had to go to Charleston and swear out a warrant for their arrest. If you wanted to have them tried, they had to be taken to Charleston. These people lived in the back country way up the river from Augusta, Georgia.4 There was almost nothing in the way of law. The only court they had was in Charleston. The Royal Army, the King’s Army, was sent up there once in a while.

A group of people called themselves Regulators. There were regulators also in other parts of the colonies. They took law and order in their own hands and dispensed it in their own idea of justice with a vengeance and without mercy.

"In September 1769, Daniel ROBINSON and a posse claimed that a horse in the stable of John HARVEY, a settler on the Noble’s Creek in Long Cane, was stolen. Acting as their own judge and jury, they sentenced John HARVEY to 500 lashes. They then carried out their own sentence to the rhythm of a dance tune played on a drum and a screechy violin.

"Fifty men each gave him 10 lashes, 500 lashes. They bundled some canes together and hit him with it. John HARVEY, being an attorney himself, sued ROBINSON in His Majesty’s Court of Common Pleas in Charleston and obtained a judgment in the amount of £50. £50 was a lot of money at that time.

"Because of a severe disagreement between the Chief Justice and the Associate Justice of the Superior Court of the Province of South Carolina, the case ended in the Governor’s Council where the two judges tried to explain their argument over the charge to the jury. Here is a letter that one of the justices wrote to the governor which I think explains this very well." (Ralph F. HARVEY)

"Sometime ago an action was brought in Her Majesty’s Court of Common Pleas by John HARVEY against D. ROBINSON for an assault in which HARVEY, the plaintiff, obtained judgement by default on Tuesday October 13. In the inquiry of damages the plaintiff HARVEY laid evidence before the court to the following effect:

"In the month of September 1769, the plaintiff HARVEY was seized by a body of people amounting in number to about 50 or 60 people, among whom the defendant ROBINSON was there. He appeared to be captain or leader of the party that was of a place called Noble’s Creek. They chained the plaintiff HARVEY with a wagon chain and locked him to a sapling.

"They then stripped him to his shirt, keeping him chained in that manner for about two hours. They whipped him alternately for the space of an hour with bundles of rods of switches. Each person giving him 10 stripes until he received 500 stripes. ROBINSON gave him 10 stripes in his turn. The blood streamed down his back. From that account of one of the witnesses who saw him some days after, it appeared his back was then in a shocking condition. It was very sore and very festered.

"One of the witnesses, before HARVEY was whipped, was invited by the mob to join them. He refused to do so. He told them it was inhumane of them to use their fellow creatures in that manner. He asked why they whipped him. They answered because he was roguish and troublesome.

"On being asked how they did prove him to be so, they answered thay would not be that troubled. The mob remained during this transaction of drum beating and fiddle playing. One of the witnesses said he heard from from some of the mob that the resentment against HARVEY proceeded from a horse being found in his possession that he had no right to. Mr. Justice LOWNDES asked one of the witnesses if ROBINSON was not a fair and honest character. He said he was, but afterward had some doubt thereof. It seemed of late he did not so well deserve that character. No evidence was offered by the defendant.

"After I had recapitulated the evidence of the jury, I thought it my duty to interpret for them. The case had been fully proved. It appears to be an assault of the most extraordinary nature that had ever befallen, within knowledge, that in in a civilized country under the government of laws for 50 to 60 people to assemble together to seize some of His Majesty’s subjects. Then in the King’s peace to assume for themselves the power of judgement of his conduct according to their observed creed and indirected ideas of justice and influence inflicting so cruel and severe punishment." [The document goes on a bit farther, but we weren’t given the end of it. Irma C. Lampton]

This document came out of Her Majesty’s Public Record Office in London, England. Whether that horse was stolen or not, it was not proven. There was no evidence given that it was stolen.

John HARVEY must not have been such a bad man. He had three sons who became ordained ministers of the Gospel.

Perhaps because he was an attorney and knew the law, some of the people were trying to take the law in their own hands found him to be troublesome. All of his sons and all his grandchildren were married into and associated with some of the finest families in Georgia.

John HARVEY died not long after that ordeal. We do not know exactly when or where, or where he was buried, but his widow, Mary, married a neighbor who lived on the same creek. This man was William MANER. Mary Harvey MANER was a widow for the second time by 1774 as shown in the court records of the settlement of William MANER’s estate. She was still living as late as February 20, 1778, for on that date, Mary MANER and her sons Evan HARVEY and Michael HARVEY paid the fees for the survey of land in Wilkes County, Georgia. They received warrants, but because of the American Revolutionary War, no surveys or grants were made.

After the war, her son, James HARVEY, petitioned for a warrant in lieu of an old warrant of Mary MANER, his mother. That proves they were the same folks.

The following definitions may be of help in understanding early land transactions. [Irma C. Lampton]

"When a government, under English Common Law, gives land to an individual it is called a land grant, and a record is made of the transaction. Title to the land so granted is transferred by the issuance of a patent or letters patent.

"1. The first step in the land-grant process was the filing of an ENTRY (sometimes called a petition or application by the person seeking the grant. The entry was filed with the colonial governor. Though you will find some of these colonial land entries recorded, many of them were probably never considered of enough importance to make a permanent record since they had nothing to do with the actual land title.

"2. Upon approval of the entry a WARRANT was issued for the land. A warrant is an order, and in this case it was a directive, for the "laying-out" of the lands to be granted. It was sometimes issued directly to the applicant by authority of the governor or the crown to be surrendered by him (that is, by the applicant) at the office of local land jurisdiction where the warranty was to be carried out. This procedure was not followed in all colonies but, in those where it was followed, most of the warrants were recorded and preserved at the office where they were surrendered. The applicant was ordinarily given the right to specify the land he wanted "laid out."

"3. Next the land was surveyed and measured to meet the requirements of the entry and warrant, and the PLAT (sometimes called a survey) of the land was made. A plat is a map of the tract, often showing its location in relation to land held by others and having an accompanying written description with metes and bounds.

"4. Now the grantee was ready to take possession of his land and the PATENT could be issued and recorded." [Val. D. Greenwood. The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, pp. 266-267.]

John HARVEY is said to have left a Will, but Ralph HARVEY was unable to find it. He went to Charleston, South Carolina and asked and looked. It could not be found. It just was not there.

Zephaniah HARVEY, John HARVEY’s grandson [and the son of William HARVEY], recited the chain of title of the land which John HARVEY had bought from Samuel FRY in 1767. He said it was given by the Last Will and Testament of John HARVEY to his son, William HARVEY.

Zephaniah was the administrator of William HARVEY’s estate. Zephaniah later bought the same land from his father’s estate.

The proven sons of John and Mary HARVEY were: William, John Jr., Thomas, Evan, James, Michael, and Richard.

"I used the ages of these men’s children to arrive at an age for the sons. I believe Richard to be the youngest because of his Will and other information to be given later." [Ralph F. HARVEY]

ENDNOTES [by the author of this web page]:

1. This was Matthew TALBOT (27 November 1729, Bristol Parish, St. George County, Virginia, British North America - 12 October 1812, Morgan County, Georgia), who was married to Mary HALE (7 July 1730, St. Paul’s Parish, Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, British North America - 1785, Watauga, Washington County, Tennessee) in June 1753, Bedford County, Virginia.

Matthew TALBOT "was a hunter, trapper, merchant, stockman, Indian fighter and patriot. In 1777/78, he left Virginia and settled first in the valley of the Watauga River in what is now eastern Tennessee.  He was engaged in the cattle business and operated a mill.  He had significant land holdings in the area including the land upon which Fort Watauga was built.  He ground corn for the settlers to use when they marched over the mountains where they defeated the British in the famous Battle of Kings Mountain. Matthew served in the commissary during the Revolutionary War and his four older sons also served.  Edmund and Clayton were too young to fight.   His wife, Mary Hale Day,  died in 1785 and shortly afterward, he moved to Wilkes County, Georgia where his younger brother, John, was living.  Hale, Thomas, and Mary [his children] appear not to have accompanied him but Matthew (III), William, Edmund, and Clayton [his remaining children] did.  Later he moved to Morgan County, Georgia where he died in 1812.  Although scant, evidence exists to show that he was remarried.

"Matthew and his wife were active in the Anglican church but he joined the Baptist church, probably while in Tennessee, and became a preacher.  He was one of the first Baptist ministers to preach in the Watauga area of present day East Tennessee and he was the first pastor of the Sinking Creek Baptist Church there.   He continued to preach the remained of his life.  Many of his descendants followed in his footsteps as ministers of the gospel." [cited from Judy Blaydoe]

2. Matthew TALBOT (1729) should not be confused either with his son, Matthew TALBOT (1756, Bedford County, Virginia - 1804, Davidson County, Tennessee) or with his nephew, Matthew TALBOT (3 March 1767, Bedford County, Virginia - 17 September 1827, Washington, Wilkes County, Georgia). It was Matthew TALBOT (1767) who, after settling in Wilkes County, Georgia with his mother, father, and siblings in 1783, became governor of the state (1819). Matthew TALBOT (1767) was the son of John Williston TALBOT (13 July 1735, Bedford County, Virginia - 25 August 1798, Wilkes County, Georgia) and Mary ("Phoebe") MOSELEY (?, Princess Anne County, Virginia - BEF 6 August 1806, Wilkes County, Virginia), who were married in 1768, Campbell County, Virginia. John Williston TALBOT, Mary ("Phoebe") MOSELEY, and Matthew TALBOT (1767) were all interred in the Smyrna Methodist churchyard in Wilkes County, Georgia.

3. According to Mr. John B. Windham, the most scrupulous investigator of the family HARVEY, Nobles's Creek is now known as Horn Creek. Though it empties into Stephens Creek, it should not be identified with Stevens Creek.

4. The map below, by Mr. Ge Lee Corley Hendrix and supplied by Mr. John B. Windham, shows the relation of Horn, or Nobles's, Creek to Stevens Creek and thus to the Savannah River and Augusta, Georgia:

For documents and details concerning the case of John Harvey versus David Robinson, see The War of Regulation: John Harvey versus David Robinson.

____________________________
____________________________

G0495A: Rev. John HARVEY (Jr.) [005]
Birth: ABT 1749/50, <Brunswick, Lunenburg, or Bedford County>, Virginia, British North America
Death: 1823, Clarke County, Georgia
Father: John HARVEY (Sr.) (EST 1720, <Virginia?>, British North America - AFT 19 December 1771, Edgefield County, South Carolina)
Mother: Mary UNKNOWN

Marriage: ABT 1769/70, <Washington County>, Georgia, British North America
Spouse: Margaret JONES (EST 1752, South Carolina or Georgia, British North America - 10 February 1801, Georgia) [See G0495A: Margaret JONES, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Jones (BEF 25 February 1718 - December 1755/56).]

Child 1: Mary HARVEY (ABT 1771, <Washington County>, Georgia, British North America - ABT 1807) [F]: m. Edmund J. TALBOT (28 March 1765, Campbell County, Virginia, British North America - 18 February 1854, Henry County, Alabama), AFT 1787 and BEF 1793, Washington County, Georgia

Child 2: Ruth HARVEY (ABT 1773 - probably BEF 15 January 1808) [F]: m. Benjamin KENDRICK (died before 2 March 1812), 1791

Child 3: James HARVEY (ABT 1775, Virginia or Georgia, British North America - AFT 15 January 1808 and BEF 7 March 1808, Baldwin County, Georgia) [M]

Child 4: Rachel HARVEY (ABT 1777, Virginia or Georgia - ?) [F]: m. Unknown <John?> PARROTT

Child 5: Sarah ("Sally") HARVEY (ABT 1779, Virginia or Georgia - 1841, East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana) [F]: m. Maj. David FLUKER (28 April 1774, Georgia - AFT 1840, Louisiana), ABT 1806

Child 6: John HARVEY (ABT 1781, Virginia or Georgia - ?) [M]

Child 7: Rev. Isaac HARVEY (Sr.) (1786, Wilkes County, Georgia - 16 September 1838, Wetumpka, Autauga [now Elmore] County, Alabama) [M]: m. Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER (23 January 1791, Elbert County, Georgia - AFT 17 February 1832), 22 December 1808, Putnam County, Georgia [See G0494A: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER, in Antecedents and Descendants of Patrick Napier, Chirurgeon (ABT 1634 - AFT 26 February 1668 and BEF 12 April 1669)]

Other Marriage: AFT 10 February 1801
Spouse: Martha ("Patsy") UNKNOWN (BEF 1775 - ?)

Child 1: Willis HARVEY (1802/04, Clarke County, Georgia - ?) [M]

Child 2: Elijah HARVEY (1802/04, Clarke County, Georgia - ?) [M]

Child 3: Israel HARVEY (1804/10, Clarke County, Georgia - ?) [M]

Child 4: Claremond A. HARVEY (1804/10, Clarke County, Georgia - ?) [F]: m. Meusnican HORTON, 16 May 1832, Campbell County, Georgia

Child 5: Unknown HARVEY (1804/10, Clarke County, Georgia - ?) [F]

Note 1: Rev. John HARVEY, Jr. was a Baptist minister and, in 1785 and in 1788, is reported to have been a resident of Wilkes County, Georgia. During the Revolutionary War, he served under Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia. (See Georgia Revolutionary Soldiers, Sailors, Patriots and Descendants, compiled by Mary Carter.) Rev. John HARVEY, Jr. and his wife, who was the daughter of Michael JONES (BEF 25 February 1718, Prince George County, Maryland, British North America - December 1755/56) and Ruth BEALL (ABT 1717, Maryland, British North America - 1777, Richmond County, Georgia) [See G0496A: Ruth BEALL, in Antecedents and Descendants of Thomas Beall of Loving Acquaintance (ABT 1631 - AFT November 1732).], should not be confused - as they frequently are - with Col. John HARVIE (ABT 1747, Albemarle County, Virginia, British North America - 6 February 1807, Belvidere, Richmond County, Virginia) and his wife, Margaret JONES (also known as Margaret Morton JONES) (24 December 1752, Rockingham County, Virginia, British North America - ?), who was the daughter of Gabriel JONES (17 May 1734, Culpeper County, Virginia, British North America - 6 October 1806) and Margaret STROTHER (3 September 1726 - October 1822) (who, before her marriage to Gabriel JONES on 16 October 1749, had been widowed by George MORTON within one month of a wedding which took place 6 April 1744). Col. John HARVIE and Margaret JONES (24 December 1752) engendered Gen. Jaquelin Burwell HARVIE who, on 18 September 1813, married Mary MARSHALL (17 September 1795, Richmond County, Virginia - 29 April 1841), the granddaughter of Chief Justice John MARSHALL (24 September 1755, near Germantown, Fauquier County, Virginia, British North America - 6 July 1835, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania). [See Note 17 under G0499A: Thomas MARSHALL II in Antecedents and Descendants of Thomas Marshall II (1661 - BEF 31 May 1704).]

Wilkes County, Georgia - DEEDS:

  October 25, 1788: John HARVEY and Margaret HARVEY his wife, in Wilkes county, part of a grant to said John HARVEY, adjoining Moses POWELL, Simmons. . . . /s/ John HARVEY, /s/ Margaret (X) HARVEY. Witnesses: Benjamin (X) Simmons, Isreal Burnley, Randolph Rutland

In 1786, Rev. John HARVEY, Jr. was among the founders of the Powelton Baptist Church, near Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia.

Powelton Baptist Church, Hancock County, Georgia
[Image Credit: Mr. Alton L. Harvey]

The historical marker at Powelton Baptist Church reads as follows:

  POWELTON BAPTIST CHURCH: The Powelton Baptist Church, first known as Powell's Creek Church, was constituted July 1st 1786 with 26 members by the Rev. Silas MERCER, the Rev. John HARVEY, and the Rev. John Thomas. The Rev. Jesse MERCER became pastor of this church on February 4, 1797 and served in that capacity until late in 1825. During his ministry, 200 persons were baptized into the church.

The General Committee of the Georgia Baptists was organized here in 1803; the Baptist State Convention was formed in this church in 1822 and its sessions were held here in 1823 and in 1832.

Governor William Rabun was a distinguished member of Powelton Baptist Church and served it as Clerk and Chorister.

Gov. William Rabun (8 April 1771 - 25 October 1819), who is mentioned on the historical marker, lies interred in the graveyard at the Powelton Baptist Church.

Note 2: US Census, 1820: Clarke County, Georgia

  John Harvey

Free white males 10 - under 16: 2
Free white males 16 - under 18: 1
Free white males 16 - 26 including heads of families: 1
Free white males 45 and upward: 1
Free white females 10 - under 16: 1
Free white females 45 and upward: 1
Number of persons engaged in agriculture: 13
Slaves males under 14: 2
Slaves males 14 - under 26: 4
Slaves males 26 - under 45: 2
Slaves males 45 - older: 2
Slaves females 14 - under 26: 2

Note 3: The death of Margaret HARVEY (née JONES), as 10 February 1801, was reported in the Louisville Gazette, Louisville, Jefferson County, Georgia.

Note 4: Edmund J. TALBOT was the pioneer Baptist minister of Jones County, Georgia, who served the congregation which met at Hooten's Meeting House and which was founded by Henry Hooten between 1808 and 1810. Since 1812, this congregation has met, in the same location, as Elam Baptist Church. Edmund TALBOT was the son of Matthew TALBOT (27 November 1729, Bristol Parish, St. George County, Virginia, British North America - 12 October 1812, Morgan County, Georgia) and Mary HALE (7 July 1728, Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland, British North America - 1785, Watauga, Carter County, Tennessee), who were married in June 1753, Bedford County, Virginia, British North America. Edmund J. TALBOT was second married to Susannah MCCULLOUGH (née CAWTHON). His tombstone and that of his second wife, Susannah, are located in the Columbia Cemetery in Houston County, Alabama. His dates of birth and death are gathered from his tombstone. Mrs. Susannah TALBOT was born 22 November 1775 and died 1 December 1843.

Note 5: Benjamin KENDRICK, the husband of Ruth HARVEY, was the son of James KENDRICK and Susannah ROBERSON.

Note 6: To Sarah HARVEY and Maj. David FLUKER, David Jones FLUKER was born 14 June 1809 in Putnam County, Georgia. By 1820, according to the United States Census of 1820 for East Felciana Parish, Louisiana, this family was residing at Red Wood Creek in East Felciana. In the United States Census of 1850 for East Feliciana Parish, David Jones FLUKER's age is given as 41. David Jones FLUKER, in East Feliciana, on 29 May 1834, married Isabella Ann KENDRICK (born 1815, in Lousiana) who, on 19 October 1848, in East Feliciana, gave birth to David Jones FLUKER, Jr.

According to the Georgia Journal, on 27 May 1812, there was a sheriff's sale, in Jones County, Georgia, of the property of "Captain Samuel Tinsley, in favor of David FLUKER, for the use of John H. Broadnax. Signed F. F. Smith, D. Sheriff."

Maj. David FLUKER is certainly known to have been residing in Louisiana as early as 1815.

At the library of the University of Texas, the collection of manuscripts assembled by Edward Alexander Parsons (1878 - 1962) is housed. The collection is described as follows:

  The Edward Alexander Parsons Collection contains several hundred sub-collections comprising a wide variety of manuscript documents relating primarily to the Louisiana area. Records dated between 1678 and 1928 provide a wealth of information about government of the area by the French and Spanish in the 18th century, negotiations between the United States and these countries for free navigation of the Mississippi River and for the Louisiana Purchase, activities of the Louisiana Militia in the War of 1812 and the Battle of New Orleans, and the Aaron Burr/James Wilkinson conspiracy. Individual documents of note include several documents issued by Louis XIV and Louis XV of France, correspondence and legal records relating to privateer and smuggler Jean Laffite, 1813-1815; correspondence of General James Wilkinson regarding the War of 1812 and other matters; and two late 18th-century letters from Thomas Jefferson, one to Bernardo de Galvez, regarding settlement, navigation, and Indians.

In the Parsons collection, three documents written by David FLUKER are preserved:

  United States. Army. Morning, weekly and monthly reports of military units stationed in Louisiana area, 1814-1815
   
  Report of the different guard mounted at and round about the camp at [Jourdan's Canal?] on the 19th and relieved on the 20th day on January 1815. Signed David FLUKER, Major, Camp [Jourdan?], 2 pp. Hw. Eng. January 20, 1815.

Morning report of the 10th Regiment of Louisiana Militia commanded by Colonel Robert Young. Signed by David FLUKER, Major, 20th Regiment, and John Austin, Adjt., 10th Regiment of Louisiana Militia. Camp Morgan, 2 pp. Hw. Eng. January 17, 1815.

Report of the different guard mounted at and round about the camp at [Jourdan's Canal?] on the 19th and relieved on the 20th day on January 1815. Signed David FLUKER, Major, Camp [Jourdan?], 2 pp. Hw. Eng. January 20, 1815.

Note 7: James HARVEY signed his Will 15 January 1808. The document was proven, in Baldwin County, Georgia, 7 March 1808. He named neither spouse nor children. As brothers, he mentioned John HARVEY and Isaac HARVEY. He mentioned his sister, Sarah FLUKER and his brother-in-law, David FLUKER. He also referred to a nephew, Burwell KINDRICK (or KENDRICK) and a niece, Susan KINDRICK (or KENDRICK). Other references were made to Robert Rutherford, Elijah CLARK, John H. Posey, and John Hill. [See Baldwin County, Georgia, Will Book A, 1807 - 1832.]

Note 8: In Jones County, Georgia, on 2 March 1812, Isaac HARVEY and John GAY furnished letters of guardianship in regard to Susan KENDRICK, orphan of Benjamin KENDRICK. See Jones County, Georgia, Guardian and Administrators Bonds, 1811 - 1815, Drawer 75, Box 68, Microfilm Room, Georgia Archives.

John GAY (1 January 1760, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - BEF 12 December 1817, Jones County, Georgia) was the brother of Gilbert GAY (2 February 1771, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - 9 September 1853, Fayette County, Georgia) who was the husband of Lavise REYNOLDS (12 December 1769, North Carolina, British North America - 9 September 1853, Fayette County, Georgia) and who, through his son Thomas Bolling GAY (15 May 1797, Greene County, Georgia - 1866, Fayette County, Georgia), was the paternal grandfather of Mary Ann ("Polly Ann") GAY (16 July 1829 - ?), the wife of Philip Haddox BRASSELL (13 October 1827, Fayette County, Georgia - 19 September 1876, DeWitt County, Texas). Philip Haddox BRASSELL was the brother-in-law of Helen Marr COX (ABT 1832, <Henry County>, Georgia - BEF 1870), the daughter of Amanda Melvina HARVEY and Samuel Waller COX. [See below, Child 1: Helen Marr COX under G0493A: Amanda Melvina HARVEY.]

John GAY was married to Amelia CASTLEBERRY (ABT 1767 - ?) about 1786 and Gilbert GAY was married to Lavise REYNOLDS (12 December 1769, North Carolina, British North America - 9 September 1853, Fayette County, Georgia), in Georgia, in 1793. They were the sons of Thomas GAY (ABT 1730, Isle of Wight County, Virginia, British North America - BEF 1802, Franklin County, North Carolina) and Patience MCDANIEL (ABT 1740 - ?); and their siblings were: Johanna GAY (1756 - ?) [F]: m. Robert SIMS (ABT 1752 - ?); Temperance GAY (1758, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [F]: m. Jeremiah WALKER; Mary ("Polly") GAY (1760 - ?) [F]: m. Joseph THOMPSON (ABT 1756 - ?); Joshua GAY (ABT 1763, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M]: m. Sallie <BROWN> (ABT 1770 - ?); Allen GAY (15 March 1765, Northampton County, North Carolina, British North America - 18 June 1849, Coweta County, Georgia) [M]: m1. Ann BENTON (ABT 1769 - ?); m2. Abigail CASTLEBERRY (24 August 1767, North Carolina, British North America - ?); William GAY (1766, North Carolina, British North America - 22 May 1852, Fayette County, Georgia) [M]: m. Mary HUNT (28 January 1770 - 28 May 1851, Fayette County, Georgia), ABT 1790; and Thomas GAY (ABT 1774, North Carolina, British North America - ?) [M]: m. Amelia BARFIELD (ABT 1778 - ?).

Thomas Bolling GAY (15 Gay 1797, Greene County, Georgia - 1866, Fayette County, Georgia), the nephew of John GAY, was married to Martha BRIDGES (1802, Georgia - 1860) in 1818. Their children were Nancy GAY (25 July 1819 - ?) [F]: m. George PAGE (ABT 1815 - ?); Gilbert GAY (22 November 1820 - ?) [M]: m. Martha GLASS (ABT 1824 - ?); Lavise GAY (22 October 1822 - ?) [F]: m. John Whitaker (ABT 1818 - ?); Wiley Jones GAY (1 June 1824 - 1905) [M]: m. Pellatiah MCELROY (3 January 1830 - 1885); John GAY (26 January 1826 - ?) [M]; Sarah Jane GAY (18 July 1827 - ?); Mary Ann ("Polly Ann") GAY (16 July 1829 - ?) [F]: m. Philip Haddox BRASSELL (13 October 1827, Fayette County, Georgia - 19 September 1876, DeWitt County, Texas), 2 November 1851, Fayette County, Georgia; Thomas M. GAY (1 August 1831, Fayette County, Georgia - ?) [M]; Naoma J. GAY (18 September 1837 - ?) [F]; Leonard C. GAY (13 June 1839 - ?) [M]; Isaac Pond GAY (20 February 1841 - ?) [M]; William H. Mitchell GAY (20 February 1841 - ?) [M]; and Alonzo Ageda GAY (20 June 1844 - ?) [M]. [See A History of Clayton County, "Gay Family," by Ena Wilson and Annis Richardson, for the listed family of Thomas Bolling Gay: "The antebellum mansion in Woolsey, Georgia, known as the Woolsey House, was built by Thomas Bolling Gay, and he and his family lived there many years."] [See below, G0493A: Amanda Melvina HARVEY, Note 3; and see G0495C: Maj. Zachariah PHILLIPS, Note 5, in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822), and G0493A: Samuel Waller COX, Note 3, in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05).]

Note 9: The following paragraphs are taken from William and Irma Lampton, Partial History of the Harvey Family (1992), pp. 4 - 5, based on the researches of Ralph Ferguson Harvey (2 June 1919, Alabama - 25 September 1989, Dallas County, Texas).

  John HARVEY, Jr. was a prominent Baptist minister in Georgia.

Rachael HARVEY, the wife of Thomas, and Margaret HARVEY, the wife of John, were sisters as proven by the Deed of Gift of Ann Christian BEALL/BELL dated 24 September 1772 and recorded in Georgia Colonial Records, Book T - I, page 37.

Rachael Jones HARVEY’s step-grandmother was Ann Christian RIALS or RYALS. Rachael’s grandfather, Thomas BEALL/BELL, married the second time Ann Christian RIALS in Georgia. Ann C. RIALS became Ann Christian BEALL/BELL.

Rachael Jones HARVEY’s mother, Ruth JONES, married the second time James PHILLIPS. Ruth JONES was then Ruth PHILLIPS. [Correction: Ruth JONES (née BEALL) was married to John PHILLIPS, not James. See G0497A: William PHILLIPS (Jr.), Child 1: John PHILLIPS , in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips (ABT 1772 - 1822).]

  Deed of Gift, 24 September 1772

I, Ann Christian BELL of the Province of Georgia and St. Matthews Parish, widow, for and in consideration of the love, good will . . . my loving daughter-in-law Ruth PHILLIPS . . . I do lend to sd. Ruth PHILLIPS a negro girl . . . and at the decease of the said Ruth PHILLIPS . . . to Margaret HARVEY, the daughter of sd. Ruth PHILLIPS, the above sd. negro girl . . . and the first child of the sd. negro shall have to be the property of Rachael HARVEY, the 2nd child sd. negro . . . to be the property of Michael JONES, a son of the sd. Ruth PHILLIPS.

/s/ Ann Christian (X) BELL

Wit. Thos CHISOLM, Isaac MOUNSEY

John CHISOLM

Thomas CHISOLM and John CHISOLM swore that they saw Ann Christian BELL (BEALL) sign and deliver the Deed to John HARVEY, 24 September 1772. Recorded 25 September 1772.

John HARVEY, Jr. and Margaret, his wife, had a number of deeds up until the time of her death which was reported in the Louisville Gazette of Louisville, Georgia:

  "Mrs. Margaret HARVEY, 49 years, wife of Rev. John HARVEY died February 10, 1801."

John Harvey, Jr. died in Clarke County, Georgia in 1823. We do not know where John and his wife, Margaret, are buried.

____________________________
____________________________

G0495B: Thomas HARVEY
Birth: ABT 1750, Lunenburg County, Virginia, British North America
Death: 1791 to BEF 29 February 1792, Greene County, Georgia
Father: Rev. John HARVEY (Sr.) (EST 1720, <Virginia?>, British North America - ABT 1770, Edgefield County, South Carolina)
Mother: Mary UNKNOWN

Marriage: Georgia, British North America
Spouse: Rachel JONES (ABT 1754, <Washington County>, Georgia, British North America - 1801/02, Hancock County, Georgia) [See G0495B: Rachel JONES, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Jones (BEF 25 February 1718 - December 1755/56).]

Child 1: Ruth HARVEY (BY 1770, <Greene County>, Georgia, British North America - ?) [F]

Child 2: Mary ("Polly") HARVEY (ABT 1770 - ?) [F]: m. Benjamin JONES (ABT 1766 - ?)

Child 3: John Jones HARVEY (ABT 1771 - ?) [M]: m. Catherine UNKNOWN

Child 4: Michael HARVEY (ABT 1772, Greene County, Georgia, British North America - 11 May 1850, Mississippi) [M]: m. Mary ("Polly") CLOWER (1779, Warren County, Georgia - 20 September 1858, Hinds County, Mississippi), 3 July 1796, Warren County, Georgia

Child 5: Sarah ("Sally") HARVEY (18 June 1776, Georgia, British North America - 22 May 1837, Hinds County, Mississippi) [F]: m. William SPENCER (15 March 1774, Wilkes County, Georgia - 26 January 1852)

Child 6: Margaret Ann HARVEY (ABT 1780, <Edgefield County>, South Carolina - 27 February 1841, Copiah County, Mississippi) [F]: m. Jesse THOMPSON (ABT 1778, Georgia - 8 January 1833, Copiah County, Mississippi)

Child 7: Thomas HARVEY (ABT 1781, Edgefield County, South Carolina - 9 October 1857, Carroll County, Mississippi: interment at Harvey Cemetery, Carroll County, Missippi) [M]: m. Priscilla STOVALL (1790, Wilkes County, Georgia - 1876, Hinds County, Mississippi: interment at Harvey Cemetery, Carroll County, Mississippi), 11 June 1816, Marion County, Mississippi Territory

Child 8: Rebecca HARVEY (ABT 1785 - ?) [F]: m. John Wade HARVEY (24 September 1766, Edgefield County, South Carolina, British North America - 24 September 1845, Attala County, Mississippi), AFT 28 May 1803 [See above, G0496A: John HARVEY (Sr.), Note 2.]

Child 9: Verlinda HARVEY (ABT 1790, <Greene County>, Georgia - ?) [F]: m. John CARR (ABT 1790, Jones County, Georgia - ?), 15 November 1811, Jones County, Georgia

Child 10: Evan HARVEY (1790 - ?) [M]: m. Elizabeth UNKNOWN

Note 1: The elder Thomas HARVEY, in 1785, was residing in Wilkes County, Georgia. He was a soldier in the army of Col. Elijah CLARKE, from Georgia, during the Revolutionary War. There is record, dated 2 October 1784, of his authorization to receive pay for service in the regiment of Colonel Samuel Hammond. Previous to the War, in 1765, he had obtained grants of land in South Carolina. For the terminus ad quem of his date of death (29 February 1792), see (1) Court of Greene County, Georgia, 3 April 1792, Letters of Administration for the Estate of Thomas Harvey, in the DAR Library, Washington, D. C. and (2) Bienville Parish Historical Society, History of Bienville Parish, p. 134, in the Jackson Parish Library, Jonesboro, Louisiana. A terminus a quo often suggested for his date of death (1779) is to be found in Texas Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Texas Daughters Revolutionary Ancestors (1976), p. 978, in the Abilene Public Library, Abilene, Texas. Certainly, at the beginning of 1779, he was residing in Hancock County, Georgia.

  Greene County, Georgia: Harvey, Thomas, deceased: John Harvey of Washington County, Georgia, Michael Harvey, Evan Harvey and James Harvey of Greene County, Georgia applied for letters of administration on 3 April 1792 in Greene County, Georgia [Source: Georgia Intestate Records, by Jeanette Holland Austin, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1996, p. 139]

Because Thomas HARVEY died intestate, his estate was administered by his brothers John, Michael, Evan, and James. Casual investigators have jumped to the conclusion that the John, Michael, Evan, and James HARVEY by whom Thomas's estate was administered must have been his sons. But, at the time of his death, Thomas HARVEY had no adult (21 years of age or older) male children by whom his estate could have been legally administered. Thus, by fathering Thomas HARVEY onto his own brothers, careless reporters of this line have wreaked considerable havoc. Chief among these have been Mr. and Mrs. John Bennett Boddie in Historical Southern Families, vol. 1 (1957).

Note 2: In 1802, the Tax List for Hancock County, Georgia, Capt. Lucas's District, shows Evan HARVEY as the executor for Rachel HARVEY (née JONES). She is last known to have been alive on 6 June 1801 when, according to the Minute Book of the Baptist Church of Christ at Powelton, Hancock County, Georgia, she joined the church "by experience."

Note 3: John Wade HARVEY, the husband of Rebecca HARVEY, was the son of William HARVEY (ABT 1745, Virginia, British North America - AFT 1 December 1787 and BEF 14 January 1788, Edgefield County, South Carolina) and Verlinda <WADE?>. John Wade HARVEY and his wife, Rebecca HARVEY, thus were first cousins. A Bible-record states that John Wade HARVEY died in 1845, at the age of 79. [See above, G0496A: John HARVEY (Sr.), Note 2.]

Note 4: Mary ("Polly") CLOWER, the wife of Michael HARVEY, was the daughter of John CLOWER (ABT 1753, <of Morgan County>, Georgia - AFT 23 May 1817) and Jane PERKINS (EST 1757, Georgia - ?)

  "John CLOWER of Morgan County, State of Georgia, for love and affection for daughter "Polly" (Mary) HARVEY of Jones County, Territory of Mississippi: a negro girl." Dated 11 October 1809. Witnesses: Clim TRANUM, Thomas HARVEY. Marion County, Mississippi, Orphan Court Records, Book A, October 1812 to March 1827, p. 31. This indenture appears in the records for 1816, when John CLOWER was a resident of Marion County, Mississippi Territory.

"Michael HARVEY in the month of November last appointed John CLOWER of Marion County his true and lawful attorney to transact all his business in the State of Georgia. He revokes the power of attorney." Witnesses: James PHILLIPS, Jr., John T. SPENCE. Registered on 23 May 1817. Marion County, Mississippi, Orphan Court Records, Book A, pp. 34-35.

Note 5: Jesse THOMPSON, the husband of Margaret Ann HARVEY, appears to have been the son of Benjamin THOMPSON (Sr.), whose Will was proven in Hancock County, Georgia, 10 March 1797, and whose wife's name was Anne SPAIN. Jesse THOMPSON is mentioned in the Will.

  Some Georgia County Records: Vol 1

The Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr.

Southern Historical Press (1977)

[pg 116] [Hancock Co. Wills & Estate Records; 1794-1804, Vol. A-AAAA] Pages 177-179: Will of Benjamin THOMPSON, Senr. of Hancock Co. . . . very sick and weak in body...my dearly beloved wife Anne . . . to my son Jesse son William . . . to my daughter Rachel CUTCHING (CATCHING?) . . . sons Benjamin THOMPSON, John THOMPSON, Isham THOMPSON, Gideon THOMPSON, Joseph THOMPSON and heirs of Zachariah THOMPSON one dollar to each of them . . . daughters Rebecca JONES, Susannah MCINTOSH & Nancy CAWLY one dollar to each . . . to grandsons Benjamin WOOD, Joseph WOOD one hundred dollars when they come of age...wife Anne, Jesse son, and friend Henry GRAYBILL, Exrs . . . May 12, 1796 . . . Benja. THOMPSON (Seal). Wit: Hen. GRAYBILL, Solomon JORDAN, John GOODE. Proven by Solomon JORDAN and John GOODE. March 10, 1797.

Deed Book A-B, Pgs 258 - 259 12 July <1793?> Hancock County, Georgia. Records: Jesse THOMPSON and wife ANN, for 40 lbs Sterling, deed to John LANGSTON RN 14505, Solomon LANGSTON RN 407 AND Moses LANGSTON RB 59771, 135 acres of land on Shoulderbone Creek, Adj. McGEE, part of a grant to said THOMPSON /s/ Jesse THOMPSON and Ann THOMPSON Witnesses: John COLBERT, Samuel TOWNSON

Thompson Magazine, p. 77, Vol 5, July 1966

Ann THOMPSON, above, will have been Margaret Ann HARVEY.

Note 6: For the marriage of Thomas HARVEY and Priscilla STOVALL, John T. SPENCER acted as bondsman. [See Marion County Marriages: 1816 -1817, p. 122.] In this connection, it is worth mentioning that Benjamin JONES stood bond for the marriage, in Marion County, of Lewis STOVALL and Margaret JONES, Margaret JONES is listed on the marriage-bond as his daughter. This is dated 8 May 1816. [See Marion County Marriages: 1816-1817, p. 119.]

Note 7: The following paragraphs are taken from William and Irma Lampton, Partial History of the Harvey Family (1992), pp. 7 - 8, based on the researches of Ralph Ferguson Harvey (2 June 1919, Alabama - 25 September 1989, Dallas County, Texas).

  Thomas HARVEY was the third known son of John and Mary HARVEY. He married Rachael JONES before 1772.

Thomas HARVEY served in the American Revolutionary War as a soldier from Georgia. Col. Elijah CLARKE said he was a good soldier whose wife was named Rachael. This information can be found in the Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book, XX, page 39. This statement was probably taken from a certificate which was presented by Thomas HARVEY, as a Revolutionary soldier, to obtain a warrant for bounty land. "Early in the American Revolution, the Continental Congress authorized each private and noncommissioned officer to receive a bounty of $50, 50 acres of land, and a new suit of clothes for his service. Various states, in addition to the promises of the Continental Congress, authorized bounty land for Revolutionary veterans and preserved tracts in their western territories to make good their pledges." [Val. D. Greenwood. The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy, p. 273.]

It was correct that Thomas HARVEY’s wife was named Rachael. On 19 August 1791, Thomas HARVEY and Rachael, his wife, sold 846 acres in Greene County, Georgia to John ROBINSON. The deed states that this was part of a tract of 1246 acres originally granted to Thomas HARVEY by Gov. George MATHEWS, Esq. on 31 December 1787. [Greene County Deed Book A/B, p. 241]

Thomas was a relatively young man who had no sons old enough to serve as administrators of his estate when he died. His four brothers who were living in Georgia at that time, John Jr., Evan, James, and Michael, applied for Letters of Administration. They served as administrators until after Thomas’s widow, Rachael, died.

All of the HARVEY brothers, except Thomas, left Wills. It would seem reasonable to assume his death was sudden and unexpected. No record seems to be extant which would show the cause of his death. We do not know the place of his burial.

When Thomas HARVEY died in Greene County, Georgia, in 1791 and the inventory was made the negro boy named York was there. Several years later John HARVEY Jr. made a deed of gift of York and Nathan to one of his sons and confirmed this gift in his Will when he died in Clarke County, Georgia, in 1823.

The Greene County Record Book A, pp. 33 - 35, shows that on April 3, 1792, Letters of Administration were granted to John HARVEY of Washington County, Michael HARVEY, Evan HARVEY, and James HARVEY of Greene County on the estate of Thomas HARVEY, deceased, and a warrant of appraisal directed to James BATTLE, Joseph HENRY, and William LORD. The record of inventory and appraisal of the estate of Thomas HARVEY, late of Greene County, included:

  160 acres of land
1 negro named York
1 negro named Jane
1 negro named Quash
1 negro named Cate
Various livestock, tools, and household goods

All for the total of £230.0.10

In Greene County Record Book B, pp. 56 - 57, there is a settlement shown on the estate of Thomas HARVEY. This also shows the value of the estate as £230.0.10. This settlement included vouchers to Ruth HARVEY and Sally HARVEY and receipts from Michael HARVEY and John HARVEY. These vouchers and receipts total £61.17.4 which is less than half the estate so, obviously, there should be more. These are the only fragments of this estate which can be found.

Rachael HARVEY is shown on the Tax Lists of Hancock County in 1795 with Evan HARVEY acting as her agent and in 1796 with Mathew JONES as her agent. She must have died in 1801 or 1802 as the Tax List for Hancock County, in 1802, Capt. Lucas’s District, shows Evan HARVEY acting as executor of Rachael HARVEY. This has been checked a second time from the original rolls. No trace can be found in Hancock County of any estate record for Rachael HARVEY.

The Minute Book of the Baptist Church of Christ at Powelton shows that Rachael HARVEY joined by experience on June 6, 1801. She must have died between that date and the time of the 1802 Tax Digest.

The 1796 Tax List for Hancock County, Georgia, Capt. Crowder’s District, showed a man named Mathew JONES owning 200 acres granted to HARVEY. Mathew JONES was the agent for Rachael HARVEY with 170 acres adjoining M. JONES on Powell’s Creek. The identity of this man has not been proven but he appears to be the same as the Mathew JONES who was a witness to the deed when the administrators sold the last land of Thomas HARVEY in 1802. I do not think that he was closely related by blood to Rachael (JONES) HARVEY and was more likely to have been her son-in-law. The daughter Ruth who was given a share of the estate in January 1794 has not been traced and this man may have been her husband. Nothing has been found to either prove or disprove this.

____________________________
____________________________

G0494A: Rev. Isaac HARVEY (Sr.) [004]
Birth: 1786, Wilkes County, Georgia
Death: 16 September 1838, Wetumpka, Autauga [now Elmore] County, Alabama
Father: Rev. John HARVEY (Jr.) (ABT 1749/50, <Brunswick, Lunenburg, or Bedford County>, Virginia, British North America - 1823, Clarke County, Georgia)
Mother: Margaret JONES (EST 1752, South Carolina or Georgia, British North America - 10 February 1801, Georgia) [See G0495A: Margaret JONES, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Jones (BEF 25 February 1718 - December 1755/56).]

Marriage: 22 December 1808, Putnam County, Georgia
Spouse: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER (23 January 1791, Elbert County, Georgia - AFT 17 February 1832) [See G0494A: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER, in Antecedents and Descendants of Patrick Napier, Chirurgeon (ABT 1634 - AFT 26 February 1668 and BEF 12 April 1669)]

Child 1: Amanda Melvina HARVEY (July 1811, Butte County, Georgia - 1861, Leon or Smith County, Texas, Confederate States of America) [F]: m1. Samuel Waller COX (7 June 1808, Lincoln County, North Carolina - 1837 [BY 13 November 1837], Fayette County, Georgia), 7 February 1831, Henry County, Georgia [See G0493A: Samuel Waller COX, in Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]: m2. John Dennis STELL (17 October 1804, Hancock County, Georgia - 28 October 1862, Tyler, Smith County, Texas, Confederate States of America), 2 January 1839, Fayette County, Georgia [See G0493A: John Dennis STELL, Colonel, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Stell (1683 - ABT 1706)]

Child 2: Helen Marr HARVEY (July 1811, Butte County, Georgia - March 1881, Leon County, Texas: interment, under the same monument as Mary ["Mollie"] COX and James F. KENNEDY, at Jackson Cemetery, Leon County, Texas) [F]: m. Oliver Wiley COX (11 June 1802, Lincoln County, North Carolina - October 1852, Henry County, Georgia), 29 July 1830, Macon, Henry County, Georgia [See G0493B: Oliver Wiley COX, in Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]

Child 3: Tabitha Napier HARVEY (1812, <McDonough, Henry County>, Georgia - 27 November 1847, Bibb County, Georgia) [F]: m. Dr. Myron BARTLETT (1798, Concord, Rockingham [later Merrimack] County, New Hampshire - 9 February 1848, Bibb County, Georgia), 20 July 1831, Bibb County, Georgia

Child 4: Isaac HARVEY (Jr.) (1825, <McDonough, Henry County>, Georgia - 7 November 1833, Macon, Bibb County, Georgia) [M]

Note 1: In the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia), Saturday, 2 June 1832, Isaac HARVEY, Sr. is listed as a member of the Macon Temperance Society which, at the Baptist Church, elected officers on 18 May 1832. He was again listed as a member of the Macon Temperance Society at a meeting which occurred 20 November 1833 and which was reported by the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia) on Thursday, 5 December 1833.

Note 2: About Isaac HARVEY, Sr. mention is made in the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia), Thursday, 17 January 1833:

 

BANK OF DARIEN

The following gentlemen have been elected Directors of the Branch Bank of Darien in this city: William B. Rogers, Isaac HARVEY, John S. Childers, Thomas R. Lamar, Jeremiah Smith, Thomas T. NAPIER, Francis HARVEY.


Bank of Darien, Note Issued 1 October 1835, No. 35
Designed, Drawn, and Engraved by Freeman Rawdon
Printed by Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson, New York

Balances are reported for the Bank of Darien from 1 January 1819 to 2 March 1842.

Note 3: About Isaac HARVEY, Sr. mention is made in the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia), Thursday, 16 May 1833:

 

LEGAL NOTICES

Georgia, Bibb County: Will be sold before the Court House Door in said county on the first Tuesday in July, next, between the legal hours of sale, all the property belonging to the estate of William B. Rogers, late of said county, deceased. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said estate. (Signed) Isaac HARVEY, Adm.

Georgia, Bibb County: All those indebted to the estate of William B. Rogers, deceased, or owed money by that estate, must make immediate payment or present their notes for payment. (Signed) Isaac HARVEY, Adm.

Note 4: About Isaac HARVEY, Sr. mention is made in the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia), Thursday, 24 April 1834:

  Georgia, Bibb County: Will be sold before the Court House Door in said county on the first Tuesday in May, next, between the legal hours of sale, all the property belonging to the estate of William B. Rogers, late of said county, deceased. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said estate. (Signed) Isaac HARVEY, Adm.

Note 5: Isaac HARVEY, Sr., according to the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia) of Thursday, 21 November 1833, was a trustee of the Macon Academy:

 

MACON ACADEMY, BIBB COUNTY

Trustees: William P. Hunter, Isaac HARVEY, Joseph Washburn, Edward D. Tracy, Charles J. McDonald

Note 6: According to the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia) of Thursday, 29 May 1834, Isaac HARVEY, Sr. served on the grand jury of the Bibb Superior Court for the May term of 1834. After this, there is no further mention of Isaac HARVEY, Sr. in the Georgia Messenger until his death in 1838.

Note 7: Sarah Garland NAPIER's marriage to Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. is verified in Colonial Georgia Marriage Records from 1760 - 1810. For a physical description of Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr., see below, G0493A: Amanda Melvina HARVEY, Note 3.

In the United States Census of 1850 for District 70 of Putnam County, Georgia, taken 24 August 1850, there is record of a "Sarah HARVEY," born in Georgia about 1795, living in what appears to be a boarding house. This may have been Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER (23 January 1791, Elbert County, Georgia - AFT 17 February 1832).

Note 8: The death of Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. was reported in the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia) on Thursday, 27 September 1838. He died two weeks previous to his father-in-law, Thomas B(ooth?) NAPIER (Sr.):

 

DIED

At Wetumpka, Alabama, on the 16th instant, of bilious fever, Isaac HARVEY, Esq., formerly a citizen of this place, aged about 52.

Note 9: Amanda Melvina HARVEY and Helen Marr HARVEY were identical twins who married brothers. Tabitha Napier HARVEY's marriage to Dr. Myron BARTLETT was reported in the Charleston Observer, issue of 30 July 1831, giving the date of marriage as 19 July:

  "Married on the 19th of July, Dr. Myron BARTLETT, Editor of the Macon Telegraph, to Miss Tabitha Napier HARVEY."

This marriage was also reported on 23 July 1831, in the Georgia Messenger (Macon, Georgia), indicating the matrimonial date of Tuesday, 19 July 1831, as follows:

 

MARRIED

On Tuesday evening last, by the Rev. Benjamin Pope, Dr. Myron BARTLETT, Editor of the Macon Telegraph, to Miss Tabitha Napier, daughter of Isaac HARVEY, Esq., of this town.

The date of 20 July is stated in Bibb County, Georgia, Marriage Book - A.

Myron BARTLETT was the son of Stephen BARTLETT (ABT 1764, Bath, New Hampshire - ?) and Abigail BAILEY (10 February 1768, Grafton, Haverhiill County, New Hampshire), who were married in 1792, probably in Bath, Grafton County, New Hampshire. Apart from Myron BARTLETT, they engendered: Stephen BARTLETT (ABT 1793 - ?) [M]; Cosam E. BARTLETT (ABT 1795 - ?) [M]; Abigail BARTLETT (ABT 1797 - ?) [F]; William K. BARTLETT (ABT 1799 - ?) [M]; Theron BARTLETT (ABT 1803 - ?) [M]; and Chloe BARTLETT (ABT 1805 - ?).

Myron BARTLETT married Tabitah Napier HARVEY, who is remembered by her descendants as the daughter of "Isaac HARVEY, Esq.," in Bibb County, Georgia, on 20 July 1831. Their offspring were: Oglethorpe BARTLETT (died in 1833 at the age of ten months) [M]; Munroe BARTLETT (died in 1839 at the age of seven months); and Sarah Tabitha BARTLETT (23 October 1834, Macon, Bibb County, Georgia - 8 May 1873, Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia: interment at Linwood Cemetery, Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia) [F]: m. Lloyd G. BOWERS (died AFT 16 March 1855 and BEF 8 May 1873), 21 August 1854, Christ Church, Macon, Bibb County, Georgia.

Myron BARTLETT appeared on the 1835 Bibb County Tax list in Candler’s District (Microfilm Box 61/page 2, Georgia Archives) as owning 160 acres. Another BARTLETT and a COX apppeared under his name as also paying taxes. In 1836, Myron BARTLETT paid taxes on land in Crawford County, Newton County and Bibb County. BARTLETT and COX paid taxes on property in Macon. Myron BARTLETT was a stockholder in the Monroe Railroad and Banking Company of Macon and in the Central Railroad and Banking company of Savannah. In 1846 he paid taxes on land in Baker, Crawford, Coweta and Bibb Counties.

  "On February 9, 1848 Dr. Myron BARTLETT, former proprietor and editor of this paper died, age 50. He was a native of Concord, New Hampshire but a Georgia citizen for about 25 years." Macon Telegraph

Dr. Myron BARTLETT was the founding publisher and editor of the Macon Telegraph.

 

The following account of the Macon Telegraph is by Mary Bondurant Warren:

  "The Macon Telegraph, for a time called the Georgia Telegraph, began weekly publication on November 1, 1826 in Macon, Bibb County, Georgia. Subscription price for The Macon Telegraph was $3 per annum if paid in advance, or $4 at the end of the year, and its publisher was Myron BARTLETT. The newspaper office was on Cherry Street, near the public square in Macon, Georgia. Between October 17, 1831 and December 21, 1832, Bartlett also published the Daily Macon Telegraph.

"Mr. BARTLETT reported in the October 22, 1831 issue that there were twenty newspapers published in Georgia. One in Athens, three in Augusta, one in Bainbridge, two in Columbus, four in Macon, one in MacDonough, three in Milledgeville, one in Mount Zion (Hancock County), two in Savannah, one in Warrenton, and one in Washington. Published in Macon in late 1831 were: The Macon Telegraph (weekly, and Daily), the Georgia Messenger, the Macon Advertiser & Agricultural and Mercantile Intelligencer, and the Georgia Christian Repertory (a Methodist paper)."

Adding to Warren's account, it should be noted that Dr. Myron BARTLETT founded the Georgia Telegraph in 1823, not long after the Georgia legislature, on 9 December 1822, had created Bibb County and named its county seat after Nathaniel Macon of North Carolina. Also in 1823, James Webb designed the plan of the city of Macon. It was on 1 November 1826, that the Georgia Telegraph became The Macon Telegraph and was issued as a weekly publication, from 17 October 1831 until 26 September 1832. Then, still under BARTLETT's editorship, the newspaper became the semi-weekly Macon Telegraph from 2 October 1832 through 21 December 1832. Concurrently, from 17 October 1831 until 21 December 1832, BARTLETT published the The Macon Daily Telegraph.

In 1869, the Telegraph, as it was then called, merged with the Messenger. The News was founded by Jerome Pound, at the age of 16, with an investment of $8 in 1884. In 1969, these newspapers joined the Knight-Ridder chain. The evening News and the morning Telegraph merged in 1983. In 1990, the paper was redesigned and renamed the Macon Telegraph. In December 1997, the Macon Telegraph acquired the Warner-Robins Daily Sun, The Buyers Guide, and the Byron Gazette. In the spring of 1998, this group of newspapers formed The Middle Georgia Newspaper Group

Note 10: The death of Isaac HARVEY, Jr. was reported in the Georgia Messenger on Thursday, 14 November 1833:

 

DIED

On the 7th instant, Isaac HARVEY, Jr., son of Isaac HARVEY, Sr., aged 8 years, of this city.

____________________________
____________________________

G0493A: Amanda Melvina HARVEY [003]
Birth: July 1811, Butte County, Georgia
Death: 1861, Leon or Smith County, Texas, Confederate States of America
Father: Rev. Isaac HARVEY (Sr.) (1786, Wilkes County, Georgia - 16 September 1838, Wetumpka, Autauga [now Elmore] County, Alabama)
Mother: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER (23 January 1791, Elbert County, Georgia - AFT 17 February 1832) [See G0494A: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER, in Antecedents and Descendants of Patrick Napier, Chirurgeon (ABT 1634 - AFT 26 February 1668 and BEF 12 April 1669).]

Marriage: 7 February 1831, Henry County, Georgia
Spouse: Samuel Waller COX (7 June 1808, Lincoln County, North Carolina - 1837 [BY 13 November 1837], Fayette County, Georgia) [See G0493A: Samuel Waller COX, in Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]

Child 1: Helen Marr COX (ABT 1832, <Henry County>, Georgia - BEF 1870) [F]: m. Jabez Marion BRASSELL (26 March 1824, Fayette County, Georgia - 2 September 1871, Scott County, Mississippi), ABT 1848, Fayette County, Georgia

Child 2: John Calhoun COX (2 January 1836, Fayette County, Georgia - 19 February 1917, Sweetwater, Nolan County, Texas) [M]: m1. Sarah ("Sallie") Elizabeth ALLEN (13 July 1847, Fayette County, Georgia - 17 April 1884, Sweetwater, Nolan County, Texas), 22 June 1864, Smith County, Texas: [See G0492A: Sarah ("Sallie") Elizabeth ALLEN in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmill Phillips Allen (6 November 1811 - January 1868).] m2. *Mary Eugenia BARRON (1847, Georgia - 2 April 1916, Tyler, Smith County, Texas), 3 March 1887, Smith County, Texas [See Appendix: The System of Kinship of Mary Eugenia Barron (25 April 1847 - 2 April 1916) in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05) and see G0492A: John Calhoun COX, in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]

Child 3: Sarah COX (AFT 7 February 1831 and BEF 13 November 1837, Henry or Fayette County, Georgia - AFT 20 January 1841 and BEF 10 March 1841, Fayette County, Georgia) [F]

Child 4: Tabitha M(elvina?) COX (AFT 7 February 1831 and BEF 13 November 1837, Henry or Fayette County, Georgia - AFT 31 December 1841 and BEF 31 December 1842, Fayette County, Georgia) [F]

Other Marriage: 2 January 1839, Fayette County, Georgia
Spouse: John Dennis STELL, Colonel (27 October 1804, Hancock County, Georgia - 28 October 1862, Tyler, Smith County, Texas, Confederate States of America) [See G0493A: John Dennis STELL, Colonel, in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Stell (1683 - ABT 1706)]

Child 1: Emily Cunningham STELL (29 December 1839, Fayette County, Georgia - 21 November 1912, Palestine, Anderson County, Texas) [F]: m. Benjamin Franklin CLARK, M. D. (29 May 1829, Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia - 29 November 1904, Palestine, Anderson County, Texas), 2 April 1857, Abingdon, Washington County, Virginia

Child 2: Raphineas ("Phineas") STELL (25 April 1843, Fayette County, Georgia - 18 June 1862, Ft. Bliss, El Paso County, Texas, Confederate States of America) [M]

Child 3: Isaac STELL (15 April 1845, Fayette County, Georgia - 30 July 1864, Bonham, Fannin County, Texas, Confederate States of America) [M]

Child 4: John Dennis ("Doak") STELL (5 September 1848, Fayette County, Georgia - 8 April 1924, Scranton, Eastland County, Texas: interment at Scranton Cemetery, Eastland County, Texas) [M]: m1. Mary ("Mollie") A. ARTHUR (29 March 1851, Flat Lick, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana - 1 February 1898, near Lingleville, Erath County, Texas: interment at Lingleville Cemetery, Lingleville, Erath County, Texas), 9 December 1869, Smith County, Texas: m2. Henrietta UNKNOWN (1851, Tennessee - ?)

Child 5: Henry Moore STELL (12 May 1850, Fayette County, Georgia - 1900, Mineral Wells, Palo Pinto County, Texas) [M]

Child 6: LeRoy N(apier?) STELL (18 March 1854, Fayette County, Georgia - 1934/35, Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas) [M]: m1. Mildred Jayne ("Jennie") HAYNES (14 May 1867, Bell or Williamson County, Texas - 29 August 1908, Comanche County, Texas), AFT 1902, Comanche or Erath County, Texas; m2. Alice SHRIMER (1871, Texas - ?), AFT 20 April 1910

Note 1: Amanda Melvina HARVEY was the identical twin of Helen Marr HARVEY (G0493B), who married Oliver Wiley COX, the brother of Samuel Waller COX. It is from the testimony of Amanda Melvina HARVEY's step-grandson, John Dennis STELL (26 October 1847, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 28 February 1898, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), published in Leon County Historical Collections, vol. 1 (Leon County Genealogical Society, Leon County, Texas: 1981; reprinted from The Lone Star State Memorial and Biographical Book: 1893), that she is known to have died in 1861. John Dennis STELL (26 October 1847, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 28 February 1898, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), Mary Ella STELL (5 January 1846, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 23 May 1911, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section B-6], Centerville, Leon County, Texas) the wife of William M. JOHNSTON (16 September 1836, Scotland - 25 December 1894, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section B-6], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), an attorney in Centerville, Texas), and Emma J. STELL (29 August 1849, Gwinnett County, Georgia - AFT 15 April 1910, <Dallas, Dallas County, Texas>, the wife of David J. C. JOHNSTON [March 1844, Ireland - AFT 8 June 1900, <Corsicana, Navarro County>, Texas]) were the children of James Jones STELL (22 September 1824, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 29 October 1849, Fayette County, Georgia) and Elizabeth ("Renda") TRUITT (31 May 1825, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 24 August 1900, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section B-2], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), who were married in 1845. About ten years after the death of James Jones STELL, Elizabeth ("Renda") TRUITT, the daughter of John TRUITT of Georgia, was married to John T. GRESHAM (4 June 1817, Virginia - 15 July 1870, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section B-2], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), the widower of a Mrs. JOHNSTON, née Elizabeth CAULFIELD (1804, Ireland - 14 August 1857, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section B-3], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), who died in 1857. About 1871, John Dennis STELL (26 October 1847, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 28 February 1898, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas) was married to Mary Alice COUSINS (12 May 1854, Alabama - 11 November 1933, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), the daughter born in Alabama of a Dr. COUSINS who was native to Virginia. In the United States Census of 1850 for Choctaw County, Alabama, taken 30 September 1850, a James B. COUSINS, born in Virginia, is shown as a physician keeping office in Choctaw County. There is no other person surnamed "COUSINS" found in Alabama in the census of 1850 as a native of Virginia.

Contrary to popular intuition, Elizabeth CAULFIELD was at least ten years older than John T. GRESHAM. The United States Census of 1850 for Centerville, Leon County, Texas fixes her year of birth at 1804. William M. JOHNSTON and David J. C. JOHNSTON were the sons of Mrs. Isabella JOHNSTON, born 1808 in Ireland, who was a "school mistress" in Centerville, Leon County, Texas.

John Dennis STELL (26 October 1847, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 28 February 1898, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas), the step-grandson of Amanda Melvina HARVEY, should not be confused, as he often is, with John Dennis ("Doak") STELL (5 September 1848, Fayette County, Georgia - 8 April 1924, Scranton, Eastland County, Texas: interment at Scranton Cemetery, Eastland County, Texas), the natural son of Amanda Melvina HARVEY. On 9 December 1869, in Smith County, Texas, John Dennis ("Doak") STELL (5 September 1848, Fayette County, Georgia - 8 April 1924, Scranton, Eastland County, Texas: interment at Scranton Cemetery, Eastland County, Texas) was first married to Mary ("Mollie") A. ARTHUR (29 March 1851, Flat Lick, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana - 1 February 1898, near Lingleville, Erath County, Texas: interment at Lingleville Cemetery, Lingleville, Erath County, Texas), the daughter of Thomas Richard ARTHUR (1 January 1813, Georgia - 21 May 1873, Smith County, Texas: interment at Sandflat Cemetery, Smith County, Texas) and Rachel Dorcas LOFTIN (2 October 1818, South Carolina - 17 January 1874, Smith County, Texas: interment at Sandflat Cemetery, Smith County, Texas). After the death of Mary ("Mollie") A. ARTHUR, John Dennis ("Doak") STELL (5 September 1848, Fayette County, Georgia - 8 April 1924, Scranton, Eastland County, Texas: interment at Scranton Cemetery, Eastland County, Texas) was second married to Henrietta UNKNOWN; and, by 27 April 1910, he was residing with her in the Sixth Civil Precinct of Eastland County, Texas. He died in Scranton, Eastland County, Texas on 8 April 1924.

In the Centerville Cemetery, Centerville, Leon County, Texas, Ms. Cheryl Burks transcribed the date of birth from the headstone of John Dennis STELL (26 October 1847, Gwinnett County, Georgia - 28 February 1898, Centerville, Leon County, Texas: interment at Centerville Cemetery [Section D-4], Centerville, Leon County, Texas) as "Oct 26, 1857." The United States Census of 1880 for Centerville, Leon County, Texas, taken 13 June 1880, proves that the transcribed date is off by ten years.

  BIBLE RECORD: Arthur Family - Smith County, Texas

In the possession of Bob Arthur, P. O. Box 40854, Houston, Texas 77240
Notes in ( ) were added by Bob Arthur.

Only two family pages remain (back & front) from the old Bible.
No copyright dates for the Bible.

Page 1 - Marriages

Joseph P. Arthur and Mary L. Wesley was married Dec the 14th 1868

Their son's marriages
T. L. Arthur to Maude Lane Jefferies Jany 14 1903
B. L. Arthur to Mattie Morris, Lindale Tex Feb 14 1903

Names T. L. Arthurs children (all were born in Lindale)
Loftin Jefferies Arthur born Feby 8th 1904 - at Lindale
Mary Lennice Arthur born May 2nd 1905
Melbourne Dorsely Arthur born Mar 1st 1907
T. L. Arthur Jr born August 6th 1912
Loftin Jefferies & Bessie Snow Dece. 18, 1986 (married at Goldswaithe)
Mary Lennis Arthur & J. S. Busha
Melbourne Dorsley Arthur & Marguerite Boggan Aug 29, 1931 (married at
Livingston)
Thomas Loftin Arthur Jr & Natalie Wilson Sept 5, 1937 (maried Sulphur
Springs)
Joe Manguel Arthur & Audry Tracy were married March 1946

Page 2 - Births

The Farther - Joseph P. Arthur was Borned Oct. 14th 1840
The Mother - Mary Loucinda (Lucinda) Arthur was Borned June the 26th 1846
Louther (Luther) Stell Arthur was Borned March 18 1870 (He died at age 3
and is buried at Harris Creek Cemetery)
Thomas Loftin Arthur was Borned April 7th 1871
Byron Lee Arthur Was Borned August 3rd 1873
Joseph P. Arthur - Lindale TX Died March 20th 1916
Mary Lucinda Arthur - Lindale TX Died Jany 21st 1916

Page 3 - Deaths

Died Louther S. Arthur August the 26the 1873
Died - Dr. Byron Lee Arthur Mar. 7th 1941 - Practiced his profession
about 45 years. About 40 years at Lindale, Tex. where
he died. Buried
Dr. Thomas Loftin Arthur March 24, 1945 3 o'clock a.m. At his home in
Kingsville, Texas. Buried Chamberlain Cemetery, Kingsville, Tex.
Mary Lucinda Wesley Arthur - Lindale, Tex. Died Jan 21st 1906
Joseph Prichard Arthur - Lindale Tex. March 20th 1916

Page 4 - Memoranda

Thomas R. Arthur was borned Jan 15 1813
Rachel D. Loftin was borned Oct 7 1819
They were married Feb 17 1834
The former died in his 61st year - The latter in her 55th year

(By T. L Arthur, Sr. from Memory)
Sons: Bill (William G., married M. A. Rasbury)
John (Died in 1862, Miss. Springs Hosp.)
Joe married M. L. Wesley
Charles married Secrest (Julia Secrest)
Philip married Ella Dobbs
Jim married Dora Fowler (James Joyce "JJ" married Glen
Dora "Dorie" Fowler at Oakwood, TX, S. of Palestine)
Daughters: Martha Murrell married
1. Murrell (Joel Simeon Murrell, died in Civil War
Two children reared in Smith County after the war)
2. Jeff Lewis
Mary married Doak Stell (J. D. "Doak" Stell
Janie married Steve Yarbrough
Nettie married Frank Smyre

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: These marriages were copied from the Marriage Records of Smith County, Texas - 1846-1899
Published by the East Texas Genealogical Society (1979)
P. O. Box 6968, Tyler, Texas 75711

Arthur, C. L. Julia Ann Secrest 25 Dec 1872 G-175
Arthur, J. P. M. L. Wesley 14 Dec 1868 C-149
Arthur, P. E. Ella Dobbs 8 Dec 1880 I-37
Arthur, W. G. M. A. Rasbury 8 Jan 1861 B-167
Lewis, J. J. Mrs. Martha A. Murrell 30 Nov 1867 C-46
Smyre, F. M. S. F. Arthur 22 Dec 1875 H-89
Stell, J. D. Mollie A. Arthur 9 Dec 1869 F-34
Yarbrough, S. M. N. J. Arthur 17 Dec 1874 G-417

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Obituary published in the Stephenville Empire, Erath County, Texas, 11 February 1898:

  Mrs. Mollie L. STELL, "A Good Woman Gone," 29 March 1851 - 1 February 1898, wife of J. D. STELL, daughter of Thomas R. ARTHUR, died near Lingleville, interment at Lingleville Cemetery.

Note 2: The Estate and Succession of Samuel Waller COX:

  From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 89
  William BERRY1 and Amanda M. COX and O. W. COX2 and John DAILEY, Jr.,3 securities give bond for $4000 on 13 November 1837 upon condition that William BERRY be appointed administrator and Amanda M. COX administratrix of estate of Samuel W. COX, deceased.

/s/ William BERRY, administrator
/s/ Amanda M. COX, administratrix
/s/ O. W. COX, sec.
/s/ John DAILEY, Jr., sec. Recorded 18 November 1837

Notes:

  1. William BERRY: This was the husband of Peggy Mira (Myra) COX, the sister of Samuel Waller COX. See Child 3: Peggy Mira (Myra) COX under G0494A: Elisha COX, Captain in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05).

2. O. W. COX: This was Oliver Wiley COX, the brother of Samuel Waller COX. See G0493B: Oliver Wiley COX, Colonel in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05).

3. John DAILEY, Jr.: This was the husband of Mary Salina COX, the sister of Samuel Waller COX. See Child 9: Mary Salina COX under G0494A: Elisha COX, Captain in Antecedents and Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05).

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 89

  Amanda M. COX, adminstratrix and William BERRY, administrator and John D. STELL1 and Leonard E. Case and Jordan Johnson make bond for $5000 on 1 January 1838 upon the condition that Amanda M. COX be appointed adminstratrix and William BERRY be appointed administrator of Samuel W. COX, late of this county, deceased.

/s/ Amanda M. COX, administratrix
/s/ William BERRY, administrator
/s/ John D. STELL, sec.
/s/ Leonard E. Case, sec.
/s/ Jordan Johnson, sec.

Recorded: 4 January 1838

Note:

  1. John D. STELL: See G0493A: John Dennis STELL, Colonel in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael Stell (1683 - ABT 1706).

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 94

  John D. STELL and Hiram Dorsham and Elisha Hill make bond in amount of $2000 on 15 July 1839 upon the condition that John D. STELL be appointed administrator of Samuel COX, late of said county, deceased.

/s/ John D. STELL, administrator
/s/ Hiram Dorman
/s/ Elisha Hill

Recorded: 19 July 1839

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 100

  John D. STELL, Elijah P. ALLEN1 and Andrew McBride2 give bond for $2400 on 18 January 1841 upon the condition that John D. STELL be appointed Guardian of Sarah, Hellen, John C. and Tabitha M. COX, orphan Children of Samuel W. COX, deceased.

/s/ John D. STELL, Guardian
/s/ Elijah P. ALLEN
/s/ Andrew McBride

Recorded 20 January 1841

Notes:

  1. Elijah P. ALLEN: See Child 10: Elijah P(hillips?) ALLEN under G0495A: William ALLEN in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips Allen (6 November 1811 - January 1868).

2. Andrew McBride: This was Andrew Jackson McBride, later commander of the 10th Georgia Volunteer Infantry, CSA. See Note 13 under G0493A: Whitmill Phillips ALLEN in Antecedents and Descendants of Whitmell Phillips Allen (6 November 1811 - January 1868). Col. Andrew Jackson McBride, CSA (1805, 96th District South Carolina - 1878, Fayette County, Georgia: interment at McBride Cemetery, Fayette County, Georgia) was, at one time, the sheriff of Fayette County, Georgia. He was the son of James McBride (1777, 96th District, South Carolina - 1851, Fayette County, Georgia) and Mary Hamilton (1778, 96th District, South Carolina - 1852, Fayette County, Georgia) who were married in 1799 in 96th District, South Carolina. He married Malinda Carroll (1820, Georgia - 1880, Fayette County, Georgia: interment at McBride Cemetery, Fayette County, Georgia) 18 May 1836 in Fayette County, Georgia.

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 134

  Inventory and Appraisement of Samuel W. COX, deceased, late of Fayette County

Includes 3 town lots, Nos. 35, 51, and 85 in Fayetteville, one negro man named Billy, one negro woman named Lucy, one negro girl, Martha. Appraisers sworn 26 January 1838: Herman Dorman, William Herring, L. E. Case, Caleb Simmons. Recorded: 18 July 1838.

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 139

  Sale of Real and Personal Property Belonging to the Estate of Samuel W. COX, deceased, the Realty on a Credit the 25th December 1839 and 1840 with interest on the last payment from the 25th December 1839 the personalty in a credit until the 25th December 1839

Purchasers - L. D. King, O. W. COX, J. C. Terry, W. P. Fernandon, Allen Alford, Dr. Ogleby, Richard Phipps, Fanny Hutcheson, C. Kimsy, E. Glass, E. Moon, William Herring, John D. DeVaughn. Includes 82 acres of land, town lots 35, 37, and 85, 3 slaves - Billy, Lucy and Martha etc. Recorded: 11 July 1839

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 139

  Estate of Samuel W. COX, deceased, in Account Current with William BERRY, Administrator, and Amanda M. COX, Administratrix from 1 January 1838 to 31st December inclusive

To cash paid C. C. O., John Huie, P. O. Beall, taxes from 1837. (39 vouchers noted stating "proven account") Recorded: 11 July 1839

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 155

  Estate of Samuel W. COX, deceased, in Account Current with J. D. STELL and William BERRY, Administrators, from 1 January 1840 to 31st December 1840 inclusive

To cash paid - O. W. COX on judgment and note, A. G. Murray for cost. Recorded: 24 March 1841

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 160

  Helin M., John C. and Tabitha C. COX, Minors of Samuel W. COX, deceased, in Account Current with J. D. STELL, Guardian, from 1 January 1841 up to 31st December 1841 inclusive

To cash paid - C. C. O. Recorded: 10 March 1841

From: Jeannette Holland Austin, Fayette County Probate Records: 1824 - 1871 (Wolfe Publishing, Roswell Georgia: 1995), p. 171

  Helin M. and John C., Orphans of S. W. COX, deceased, in Account Current with J. D. STELL, Guardian, from 1 January 1842 up to 31st December 1842 inclusive

Includes a receipt for board and tuition of orphans. Recorded: 9 August 1843

   

Note 3: Jabez Marion BRASSELL, an attorney, was the son of William J. BRASSELL (24 March 1778, North Carolina - 16 June 1861, Fayette County, Georgia: interment at Alford Family Cemetery, Fayette County, Georgia) and Martha Ellen ("Patsy") HADDOX (7 April 1795, Edgefield District, South Carolina - 13 March 1836, Fayette County, Georgia: interment at Alford Family Cemetery, Fayette County, Georgia), who were married in Jones County, Georgia, 29 October 1809.

From Joel Dixon Wells and Harold R. Schultz, All Known Cemeteries in Fayette County, Georgia (Hampton, Georgia: 25 January 1980 and reprinted November 1980):

  Alford Family Cemetery

ALFORD, Jimerson, Jun 6, 1818 - Mar 22, 1902, Masonic Emblem

HEWELL, Ulette, wife of John T. Hewell, Jr., Apr 13, 1865 - Oct 17, 1893

ALFORD, DeWitt, Jun 2, 1886 - Aug 29, 1887

ALFORD, Abraham, Jul 16, 1888 - Jun 22, 1898

ALFORD, B. W., Jan 6, 1826 - Apr 16, 1901, 73 years, 3 months, 10 days, Masonic Emblem

BRASSELL, Martha Haddox, wife of William BRASSELL, daughter of Moses HADDOX and Rachel COE, Apr 7, 1795 - Mar 13, 1836, 40 years, 11 months, 6 days

BRASSELL, son of Britain BRASSELL and Dicy DAVIS, Mar 24, 1778 - Jun 16, 1861, 83 years, 2 months, 23 days

BRASSELL, Martha, daughter of Wm. and Martha BRASSELL, wife of Willis BRASSELL, Jan 20, 1819 - Mar 16, 1864, 45 years, 1 month, 27 days

BRASSELL, Titus W., Dec 10, 1847 - Sep 6, 1883

BRASSELL, Eugenia M., Mar 2, 1855 - [no date]

BRASSELL, Minnie Belle, daughter of E. M. and T. W. BRASSELL, Jan 8, 1874 - May 1, 1885

BRASSELL, Little Grover Cleveland, son of F. T. and M. S. BRASSELL, Dec 6, 1884 - Nov 11, 1885, 11 months, 5 days

BRASSELLE, William J., Jr., Oct 21, 1821 - Jan 7, 1857

  Note: According to Mrs. Mary Johnson of Inman, the following are buried in some of the unmarked graves in this cemetery: (1) Mrs. Algood FALLIS (next to Jimerson ALFORD); (2) Infant of Mr. and Mrs. John P. HEWELL (next to Mrs. Algood FALLIS); John T. HEWELL, Jr., husband of Ulette HEWELL (next to her); (4) second wife of John T. HEWELL, Jr., who was killed in Dublin, Georgia (and whose name Mrs. Johnson could not recall, on the other side of J. T. HEWELL, Jr.); (5) a young (not an infant) daughter of Algood FALLIS and his wife (next to J. T. HEWELL, Jr.'s second wife); (6) Deci, wife of B. W. ALFORD (next to B. W. ALFORD); (7) Minnie Belle ALFORD, daughter of B. W. and Deci ALFORD (at the beginning of the row after B. W. ALFORD). Also note that Uletta HEWELL was the daughter of B. W. ALFORD and his wife.

The Will of William J. BRASSELL (24 March 1778, North Carolina - 16 June 1861, Fayette County, Georgia):

  Fayette County, Georgia: Will Book A: pp. 195-198:

Georgia              )
Fayette County  )

June 29th 1860

In the name of God, Amen, I William BRASSELL of said State and County feeling myself in common health and of sound mind and knowing the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death do make this my last will and testament, in the first place I wish to commit my soul to the creator that gave it and my body to be buried in common decent form, And all my worldly estate of all and every kinds I wish disposed of in the following manner. I have eleven legal heirs, viz James M. BRASSELL, Sally ALFORD, Celia CAVENDER, John C. BRASSELL, Jabez M. BRASSELL, Delilah MOSES, Martha BRASSELL, Phillip H. BRASSELL, Britton W. BRASSELL, Laodica ALFORD, Alva H. BRASSELL. I have here to fore given to Sally ALFORD, James M. BRASSELL, Celia CAVENDER & Britton W. BRASSELL, sufficient to be their equal distributive share of all my worldly estate but I will at my death that my executors pay to each of those five dollars more out of the affects of my estate and I will that my slave property be disposed of in the following manner, Delila MOSES to have Moses and her two youngest sons Philip MOSES, Hiram Drewry MOSES to have Tilda to be equally between them when they arrive at mature age said Tilda to be hired out by my executors and all the proceeds or increase if any to be also divided equally between them. Martha BRASSELL I will to have Isaac, John C. BRASSELL to have Madison and Alva H. BRASSELL to have Beeffire (?), the balance of my slave property I will to be divided of by lot amongst or between equally all my heirs except Sally, Celia, James and Britton and if they cannot be equally [illegible] out I wish my executor to make each lot of equal value by applying of the proceeds of other property. Now after the foregoing distribution, I will that all my other property, lands, slaves, and household property except a trunnel (?) Broadstrap (?) Begs (?) and furniture to be given to Alva H. BRASSELL without any charge, I wish all the balance sold according to Law and equally divided amongst all my heirs except James, Sally, Celia and Britton. And I do hereby ordain and appoint Thomas C. Matthews my int[illegible] executor of this my last will and testament in witness of whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal the day above written in presence of us

William Jones
Samuel T Rhodes

/s/ William BRASSELL

Source: Fayette County Georgia Probate Court
Written: July 26, 1861
Recorded: July 16, 1863, pp. 221 - 223

Georgia}
Fayette County}

We the undersigned as Legatees and distributees under the will of William BRASSELL which will is dated June the twenty ninth eighteen hundred and sixty (June 29th 1860) In order to carry out the intention of said Testator and prevent future litigation, agree that said will shall be construed as follows, and the division of said property under said will shall be as follows by the administrators on said estate with the will annexed, that the will shall be construed as follows, That it was the intention of the Testator that Mose, a Negro man, bequeathed to Delila MOSES; Isaac, a Negro boy, bequeathed to Martha BRASSELL; Madison, a Negro boy, bequeathed to John C. BRASSELL; Russill? a Negro man bequeathed to Alva F. BRASSELL, should be given to them in lieu of the advancements made by the Testator in his lifetime to James M. BRASSELL, Sally ALFORD, Celia CAVENNAH, Jabez M. BRASSELL, Phillip H. BRASSELL and Ludicy ALFORD and that said Negroes above specified be delivered to said Legatees, as mentioned in said will to make them equal with those legatees above named, who received advancements in the lifetime of the Testator. We further agree, that the administrators with the will annexed be authorized to execute, to Britton W. BRASSELL, a good and sufficient title to a certain Negro boy named Simon about fourteen years of age, belonging to the estate of said Testator in order to make him equal with the balance of the legatees, he having received nothing by advancement nor specific legacy under the will, Tilda a Negro girl mentioned in said will, to be disposed of according to said will, and we all agree and consent, that acre of ground including the family grave yard, with the right of way to the same, shall be reserved by the administrators with the will annexed, and not sold or deede to any person, and that said administrators shall erect suitable and neat? monuments over the graves of the Testator and his deceased wife, and William J. BRASSELL, his deceased son, and also erect a suitable monument to the memory of Titus L. BRASSELL deceased all to be paid for out of the estate or assets of said estate; Then the balance of the property of every description belonging to said estate to be legally sold by said administrators with the will annexed (as the same cannot be divided equally to the interest of the Legatees) and the proceeds of said sale be equally divided amongst all the Legatees, mentioned in said will to wit, Sally ALFORD, Celia CAVANNAH, James M. BRASSELL, Delila MOSES, Martha BRASSELL, John C. BRASSELL, Jabez M. BRASSELL, Phillip H. BRASSELL, Britton W. BRASSELL, Ludicy ALFORD and Alva F. BRASSELL.

Given under our hands and seals this the 26th day of July 1861.

Attest

Signed sealed and delivered in the presence of

L. D. PADGETTE
R. R. Rogers J. P.

P. H. BRASSELL (LS)
John C. BRASSELL (LS)
Jabez M. BRASSELL (LS)
Alva BRASSELL (LS)
B. W. ALFORD (LS)
Ludicy M. ALFORD (LS)
Willis BRASSELL (LS)
Martha BRASSELL (LS)
Delilah MOSES (LS)
Britton W. BRASSELL (LS)

Attest

Signed sealed and delivered of us this May 20th 1863

B. W. ALFORD
Joseph L. Bishop JP (LS)

James M. BRASSELL (LS)
Scott County Mississippi

Spire (his mark) ALFORD (LS)
Scott County Mississippi

Sally (her mark) ALFORD (LS)
Scott County Mississippi

Celia (her mark) CAVENAH (LS)
Scott County Mississippi

State of Mississippi}
Scott County}

I B. W. Bonds Clerk of the probate court in and for said County and State hereby certify that the above Joseph L Bishop whom subscribed the foregoing Testament as a witness is one of the acting Justices of the Peace in and for said county duly authorized as such with full power to administer oaths and witness ?????? under the statutes of this State and that his signature above subscribed is genuine.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my official signature and affixed the seal of my office this May 21th 1863.

B. W. Bonds Clerk
Probate Court of Scott County

State of Mississippi}
Scott County}

I James W. Wafford Judge of the probate court in and for said county and state do hereby certify that the above named B. W. Bonds who subscribed the above and foregoing certificate as clerk of the Probate court of said County and affixed the seal of said court thereto is in deed commissioned as such and duly authorized to ??? the seal of said court and that his signature subscribed to said certificate is genuine.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my official signature and affixed my ???ate seal, and seal of said court this 21st day of May A. D. 1863

J. W. Wafford Judge of Probate Court of Scott County

Recorded this 16th day of July 1863
Geo C. King Ordinary and Ex officio Clerk

William J. BRASSELL was the son of Britton (or Britain) BRASSELL (ABT 1750, <Anson County, North Carolina>, British North America - September 1827, Pike County, Georgia: interment at Brassell/Alford Cemetery, Pike County, Georgia) and LaDicy DAVIS (ABT 1754, Anson County, North Carolina - 1824, Jones County, Georgia). In Pike County, Georgia, his gravestone is inscribed:

  BRITAIN BRASSELLE, Revolutionary Soldier.
Born 1750 in Acadia, Canada.
Died Sept. 1827 Pike Co, Ga
Progenitor of the Brasselle Family
Burial Place Marked by his descendants
the Brasselle Reunion June 1981

There is no evidence that Britton (or Britain) BRASSELL ever wrote his surname with a terminal e; and it seems to be untrue that he was born in Acadia.

The siblings of Jabez Marion BRASSELL were: Sarah ("Sally") BRASSELL (9 February 1811, Jones County, Georgia - 20 March 1829, Scott County, Mississippi) [F]: m. Jimmerson ALFORD; Selah ("Celia") BRASSELL (11 August 1812, Jones County, Georgia - 1 September 1863, Scott County, Mississippi) [F]: m. John M. CAVANAUGH, Fayette County, Georgia; James ("Jimmy") M. BRASSELL (6 April 1814, Jones County, Georgia - 30 July 1896, Scott County, Mississippi) [M]: m. Nancy CAVANAUGH (15 January 1815, Putnam County, Georgia - 9 March 1897, Pulaski, Scott County, Mississippi), 13 August 1835, Upson County, Georgia; Alvah Field BRASSELL [M]; Delilah BRASSELL (20 July 1816, Fayette County, Georgia - ?) [F]: m1. Hiram MOSES: m2. Wade Hampton CAVENDER, 13 May 1840, Fayette County, Georgia; LaDicy M. BRASSELL (?, Fayette County, Georgia - ?, Fayette County, Georgia) [F]: m. Britton Washington ALFORD, 11 September 1857, Fayette County, Kentucky; Martha ("Patsy") BRASSELL (20 January 1819, Fayette County, Georgia - 16 March 1864, Fayette County, Georgia) [F]: m. James Willis BRASSELL (died in Fayette County, Georgia after 20 March 1852 and before 4 October 1852), 2 November 1837, Fayette County, Georgia; Britton Washington BRASSELL (?, Fayette County, Georgia - ?, Gonzales County, Texas) [M]; William J. BRASSELL (Jr.) (21 October 1821, Fayette County, Georgia - 7 January 1857, Fayette County, Georgia) [M]; John Calvin BRASSELL (?, Fayette County, Georgia - ?) [M]: m. Martha CAVENDER, 25 May 1843, Fayette County, Georgia; Titus L. BRASSELL (5 January 1826, Fayette County, Georgia - 5 July 1859) [M]; Philip Haddox BRASSELL (13 October 1827, Fayette County, Georgia - 19 September 1876, DeWitt County, Texas) [M]: m. Mary Ann ("Polly Ann") GAY (16 July 1829 - ?), 2 November 1851, Fayette County, Georgia. [Regarding Mary Ann ("Polly Ann") GAY, see G0495A: Rev. John HARVEY (Jr.), note 8.]

In the United States Census of 1870, for Scott County, Mississippi (p. 29, Beat 1, Forest Post Office, 21 June 1870), Jabez (spelled as "Jabes") BRASSELL seems to be residing without family, listing his age as 43, his place of birth as Georgia, and his occupation as postmaster. In the same census (p. 24, Beat 2, Morton Post Office, 27 August 1870), his brother, James M. BRASSELL, is reported as follows:

  Brassell Jas. 56 M farmer 640 700 Georgia
Nancy 54 F keeping house Georgia (This is Nancy CAVANAUGH, the daughter of George and Catherine Miles CAVANAUGH.)
Katharine 24 F Georgia
Hamin 22 F Mississippi
Malissa 20 F Mississippi
Edd 17 M farmer Mississippi (This is Edward Phillip BRASSELL, m. Fannie Ann YOUNGBLOOD)
Amanda 14 F student Mississippi E
James 12 M student Mississippi E
Kavenaugh M. E. 44 F Georgia blind 35 years

By Helen Marr COX, Jabez Marion BRASSELL (Sr.) engendered Walter BRASSELL (ABT 1848, Fayette County, Georgia - ?). In the United States Census for 1870, Garden Valley, Smith County, Texas, Walter BRASSELL is shown to be residing in the household of his maternal uncle, John Calhoun COX. [See John Calhoun Cox (2 January 1836 - 19 February 1917): United States Census of 1870.] In the United States Census for the third precinct (enumeration district 70) of Gonzales County, Texas (p. 462C), taken 5 June 1880, he is shown as Walter T(homas?) BRASSELL, a single white male, occupied as a farmer, 30 years of age, born in Georgia, with both parents born in Georgia.

The Will of James Willis BRASSELL, Fayette County, Georgia:

 

Source: Fayette County, Georgia
Probate Court
Written: March 20 1852
Recorded: October 4 1852

Georgia}
Fayette County}

In the name of God Amen I James BRASSELL of said State and County being of Advanced age and Knowing that I must shortly depart this life or ????? deem it right and proper that as respects myself and family that I should make a disposition of the property which a kind providence blessed me. I therefore make this my last will and testament therby revoking and annulling all others heretofore made by me.

Item first I desire and direct that my body be buried in a decent and Christian like manner suitable to my circumstances and condition my sould I trust shall return to rest with God who gave it.

Item 2nd Second I give and bequeath to my beloved grand son James T. BRASSELL one thousand dollars to be paid to him by my Executor herein after named and to be paid to him when he becomes twenty one years of age and to be raised out of the proceeds of my property. I also give and bequeath to him one horse sadelle and bridle, also one bed, bed stead and furniture.

Item third After the death of my beloved wife Patsey the ballance of the property to be Equally divided between Samuel PREWITT husband of my beloved Daughter Polly and Lorenzo D. PADGETTE husband of my beloved Daughter Elizabeth and my beloved son Willis BRASSELL, William BRASSELL and my beloved Grand Son James T. BRASSELL.

Item fourth. I constitute and appoint my son Willis BRASSELL Executor to this my last will and testament this the 20 day of March 1852.

James BRASSELL (LS)

Sealed declared and published by James BRASSELL his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribers who subscribed our names hereto in the Signedpresence of said testator and of each other this March 20th 1852.

William BRASSELL
Richard B. Humphrey
John C. BRASSELL

Court of Ordinary
October Term 1852

Georgia}
Fayette County}

The will of James BRASSELL late of said county deceased being produced in court and the witnesses of said will to wit William BRASSELL, John C BRASSELL, Richard B Humphreys being duly sworn depose and say that they saw James BRASSELL the Testator sign seal deliver and publish the instrument now presented as his last will and testament freely volunterly and of his own accord and without any compultion or influence whatever. That at the time of the Execution of the said will said testator was of sound and disposing mind and memory that deponants signed said will as witnesses in the presence of the testator at his special instance and request and in the presence of each other, sworn to and subscribed before me in open court this 4 day of October 1852.

William BRASSELL
R. B. Humphrey
John C BRASSELL

J. L. Blalock Ordinary

Recorded this the 10 day of January 1853

Geo C King Dept Ordinary

We the Legatees under the will of James BRASSELL late of said County deceased each and every one of us for ourselves individually acknowledge notice of application to prove the will of said James BRASSELL deceased and wave all further notice of the same and have no objections to the probate thereof in solem or common form at the October Term of the court of Ordinary of said Fayette County or at any term thereafter.

September 7th, 1852

William BRASSELL, Jr.
Willis BRASSELL
Samuel PREWETT
L. D. PADGETTE

Recorded this the 10 day of January 1853 Geo C King Dept Ordinary

The Will of Willis BRASSELL, the son of James Willis BRASSELL, Fayette County, Georgia:

 

Source: Fayette County, Georgia Probate Court
Written: September 15, 1877
Recorded: October 1, 1877

436

Know all Men by these Presents That I Willis BRASSELL of Brooks Station in the County of Fayette and State of Georgia, being in ill health but of sound and disposing mind & memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, As to my worldly estate and all the property real, personal or mixed of which I shall ???? seized and possessed of, or to which I shall be entitled at the time of my decease, I devise, bequeath and dispose thereof in the manner following to wit:

First, My will is that all my just debts and funeral expenses shall by my executors hereinafter named be paid out of my estate as soon after my decease as shall by them be found convenient.

Secondly, I give devise and bequeath to my present wife Fanney and each of my two children by her Jesse & Nellie? one hundred dollars.

Thirdly, I will that my grand Son Willis Neal by daughter Martha have one hundred dollars Fourthly, I will that the remainder of my Estate be divided equally among the rest of my legal heirs.

Lastly, I do nominate and appoint my Sons Titus W. BRASSELL & John W. BRASSELL to be the Executors of this my last Will and testament.

In testimony whereof I the said Willis BRASSELL have to this my last will and testament subscribed my name and affixed my seal this the fifteenth day of September one thousand eight hundred and Seventy Seven.

Willis BRASSELL

Signed Sealed and published by Willis BRASSELL in the presence of T. B. King, A. W. Gable, and John Tilley

Georgia}
Fayette County}

Fayette Court of Ordinary
October Term 1877

Before me on the 1st day of October 1877, for the purpose of proving the last Will and testament of Willis BRASSELL, one of the witnesses to said will to wit, T. B. King and the said will being brought before me for probate of the same, the said witness deposeth and saith of the same, that he saw Willis BRASSELL Sign and publish as his last will & testament on the day & year there stated as executed by him, That he witnessed the same, at his request, and in his presence, and in the presence of the other Witnesses A. W. Gable & John Tilley who subscribed said will as witnesses. That the same was voluntarily executed by him while he was of sound & disposing mind & memory. Sworn to and subscribed before T. B. King me this 1st day of Oct 1877

L. B. Griggs Ordy

Ordered that the will of Willis BRASSELL be admitted to record as satisfactorily proven in common form & the Executors Titus W. and John W. BRASSELL have leave to qualify & before so doing that letters testamentary issue to them.

L. B. Griggs Ordy

Recorded Oct 1st 1877

L. B. Griggs Ordy & Ex Officio CCO

Note 4: The following memorandum was written by William Camp COX from information given by his father, John Calhoun COX. [See G0492A: John Calhoun COX in Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]

  JOHN C. COX

Our kin by the name of Cox were usually fair and with blue eyes with the exception of the descendants of Samuel W. Cox and possibly Oliver W. Cox, who were dark of complexion and brown eyes - and have been told quite a few of our kin were Methodists in their religion.

Where we got our dark complexion - In the early days, there settled where Birmingham, Alabama1 now stands a man by the name of Napier. He was a carriage maker and following his trade and buying land, became quite wealthy. Mr. Napier was quite wicked, that is, not strong on religion - and about the time his family was grown; especially one of his daughters (whom I figure would be our great grandmother, on our father's mother's side),2 and like Moses of old, crying in the Wilderness, there came to this community, a young Presbyterian minister to hold a meeting. This minister was named Harvey. Now the Napier girl and Harvey became lovers and afterwards married (who would be our great grandfather and mother).3 Napier had no religion and objected to the marriage, but as usual with no effect. On account of the marriage, the daughter was disowned and left out of the will.4

Mr. Harvey was of very dark complexion and is where we get our color.5 Among the children from the marriage of Harvey and Miss Napier were two daughters - Amanda Melvina Harvey - our grandmother - and Hellen Marr Harvey. Samuel W. Cox and Oliver W. Cox married these two sisters, which makes us double kin to the descendants of Oliver W. Cox.

(signed) William C. Cox6
Brownwood, Texas
July 4th, 1923

1. It was the family of Edward NAPIER (born 16 May 1842, Macon, Georgia) which settled in Alabama after the end of the War Between the States in 1865 and, therefore, long after the birth of Sarah Garland NAPIER, the grandmother of John Calhoun COX. William Camp COX has confused this branch of the family NAPIER with that of Thomas B. NAPIER (1 November 1768, Goochland County, Virginia, christened 19 March 1769, St. James, Northam Parish, Goochland County, Virginia - 30 September 1838, Bibb County, Georgia), who was the father of Sarah Garland NAPIER (who was named after her paternal aunt) and who owned real estate in Elbert, Putnam, and Twiggs Counties, Georgia. The basis for this confusion is the fact that Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. and Sarah Garland NAPIER, until the death of Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr., did reside in Wetumpka, Autauga [now Elmore] County, Alabama, which is actually near Montgomery.

2. That is, Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER.

3. That is, Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER and Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr.

4. Sarah Garland (NAPIER) HARVEY at least found honourable mention in the Last Will and Testament of her father, Thomas B. NAPIER. According to Will Book A (1823 - 1851) for Bibb County, Georgia, Thomas B. NAPIER, who died in Macon, signed his Will on 17 February 1832. The document was proved 29 October 1838. It mentions his second wife, Nancy; his children, William W. NAPIER, Thomas T. NAPIER, Leroy NAPIER, Shelton (that is, Skelton) NAPIER, Martha NAPIER, Tabitha NAPIER, and Sarah HARVEY; and his son-in-law, Nathan C. MUNROE. Also mentioned is Singleton Holt. The document was witnessed by Scott Cray, J. Washburn, and Robert W. Fort.

5. An uncomplimentary report of the physical appearance of Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. is to be found in Stephen Franks Miller, The Bench and Bar of Georgia: Memoirs and Sketches. With an Appendix Containing a Court Roll from 1790 to 1857, Etc. (2 vols. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1858), vol. 2, pp. 237 - 241:

  <237> "WILLIAM S. C. REID, son of John Reid, was born in Hancock county, Georgia, on the 20th day of October, 1802, and received his principal education at Mount Zion, under the care of Nathan S. S. Beman and his brother, Carlisle Beman, two of the most noted and successful instructors of youth in the Southern country. He completed his course at Mount Zion in the spring of 1824, and proceeded immediately to the North with letters of high recommendation from his teachers. He pursued his legal studies at New Haven under the direction of Mr. Stapler, a lawyer of established reputation. In the fall of 1825, he returned to Georgia, and was admitted to the bar at Augusta. He located for practice at Clinton the ensuing year, and continued to reside in that village until his removal to Macon, six or eight years afterward. In the mean time he had given evidence of great abilities, and had become a source of joy to his relatives, especially to his widowed mother and his affectionate sisters, all of whom looked up to him as their greatest earthly comfort. . . . <238> As a proof of his qualification, it may be remarked that he was associated with Col. Robert V. Hardeman and the Hon. Walter T. Colquitt in the prosecution of Elijah Barber, alias Jesse L. Bunkley, who was indicted in Jones Superior Court, at April Term, 1837, for cheating and swindling. This was a singular case, and occupied much time in the investigation. More than one hundred and thirty witnesses were examined, ninety-eight of whom were on the side of the prosecution. The testimony was conflicting, — many witnesses believing the defendant to be the genuine Jesse L. Bunkley, who was entitled to an estate of twenty thousand dollars; and perhaps a still greater number of witnesses and disinterested persons considered him an artful impostor, who had perhaps learned the story from the rightful heir before his death. . . . Barber was convicted and served out his term in the penitentiary. . . . Among the witnesses introduced by the prosecution were Robert Dougherty, now a judge of the Circuit Court of Alabama; Hugh A. Haralson, late a Representative in Congress, since deceased; Henry G. Lamar, formerly a Representative in Congress; and the Hon. Charles J. McDonald, since Governor of Georgia, and at present <239> a judge of the Supreme Court.

<240> "89th witness, HENRY G. LAMAR. — . . . When I entered prisoner's room he called Judge McDonald Peter Williams, and said he was very sick. He said he had no recollection of me. I asked him if he did not recollect of a lawyer in Clinton, Jones count}-, of my name, — Henry G. Lamar. I asked him a number of circumstances respecting myself and family, none of which did he recollect. He said he recollected a little, dark-skin, chunky man named Isaac HARVEY, that married old Tom NAPIER's daughter, that loaned him a ten-dollar United States bill. He did not recollect my own brothers, but recollected John T., Mirabeau, and Bazil Lamar.

"This closed the first interview. John T. Lamar, Bazil, and Mirabeau, previous to my conversation with prisoner, had been to Texas, and Isaac HARVEY had been to Alabama. Jesse L. Bunkley differed in politics from his family, and took the Troup side in my favor, and would tell me the objections urged against my election.
 
"Cross-examined — It was my first and is my last impression that prisoner is not Jesse L. Bunkley. I cannot recollect that prisoner stated that John T., Mirabeau, and Bazil Lamar lived in Jones county. Isaac HARVEY did marry NAPIER's daughter. I think she died during the war, or at least before 1817, and that HARVEY had in 1817 married his second wife.

<241> "96th witness, CHARLES J. MCDONALD. — I knew Jesse L. Bunkley shortly after June, 1818, saw him frequently, and, from that time till he left, knew him intimately. I do not think prisoner to be Jesse L. Bunkley. Col. Lamar and myself called to see him and requested that he should not be told who we were. He called me Peter Williams. He was asked if he knew either myself or Col. Lamar as attorneys at Clinton, and if he remembered Lamar's lending him ten dollars in Milledgeville. He did not recollect these, but he recollected a little stumpy fellow, named Isaac HARVEY, that loaned him a ten-dollar United States bill there, and that he married Major NAPIER's daughter. He did not know either myself or Lamar. He said he thought he had some indistinct recollection of Jim Lamar's going to the Legislature from Jones. He said he knew some of the Lamars that lived in Jones county, — John T., Bazil, and Mirabeau. Prisoner complained of being sick, and said perhaps he could give us more satisfaction in regard to these matters at a future day. I never knew of John T., Mirabeau, or Bazil Lamar living in Jones."

Henry G. Lamar's recollection that the daughter of "old Tom NAPIER" had died previous to 1817 is in error. Sarah Garland NAPIER, the wife of Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr., was still alive when, after her father's Will was proved in Bibb County, Georgia on 29 October 1838, she inherited $12,000 for herself and her three surviving children. Lamar, evidently, has confused Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. ("a little, dark-skin, chunky man") with the Isaac HARVEY who, in Jones County, Georgia, on or about 15 June 1816, married Elizabeth ROGERS.

About Henry Graybill Lamar, the following is reported in his United States Congressional biography:

  LAMAR, Henry Graybill, a Representative from Georgia; born in Clinton, Jones County, Ga., July 10, 1798; pursued an academic course; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Macon, Ga.; judge of the State superior court; member of the State house of representatives; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-first Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of George R. Gilmer; reelected to the Twenty-second Congress and served from December 7, 1829, to March 3, 1833; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1832 to the Twenty-third Congress; unsuccessful candidate for Governor in 1857; associate justice of the State supreme court; died in Macon, Ga., September 10, 1861; interment in Rose Hill Cemetery.

Henry Graybill, John Thomas, Basil, and Mirabeau (“Mirabean”) Buonaparte Lamar were all among the descendants of Thomas Lamar II (Calvert County [which became Prince George's County in 1695], Maryland, British North America, ABT 1682 - BEF 31 January 1749, Frederick County [created from Prince George's County in 1748], Maryland, British North America and Martha Blanford (Calvert County [which became Prince George's County in 1695], Maryland, British North America - ?) who were married in Prince George's County, Maryland in 1699.

About Mirabeau (“Mirabean”) Buonaparte Lamar, the following is reported in The Handbook of Texas Online:

  LAMAR, MIRABEAU BUONAPARTE (1798-1859). Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar, son of John and Rebecca (Lamar) Lamar, president of the Republic of Texas, was born near Louisville, Georgia, on August 16, 1798. He grew up at Fairfield, his father's plantation near Milledgeville. He attended academies at Milledgeville and Eatonton and was an omnivorous reader. As a boy he became an expert horseman and an accomplished fencer, began writing verse, and painted in oils. In 1819 he had a brief partnership in a general store at Cahawba, Alabama; in 1821 he was joint publisher of the Cahawba Press for a few months. When George M. Troup was elected governor of Georgia in 1823, Lamar returned to Georgia to become Troup's secretary and a member of his household. He married Tabitha Jordan of Twiggs County, Georgia, on January 1, 1826, and soon resigned his secretaryship to nurse his bride, who was ill with tuberculosis. In 1828 he moved his wife and daughter, Rebecca Ann, to the new town of Columbus, Georgia, and established the Columbus Enquirer as an organ for the Troup political faction. Lamar was elected state senator in 1829 and was a candidate for reelection when his wife died on August 20, 1830. He withdrew from the race and traveled until he was sufficiently recovered. During this time he composed two of his best known poems, "At Evening on the Banks of the Chattahoochee" and "Thou Idol of My Soul." He ran unsuccessfully for Congress in 1832, helped organize a new party, and was again defeated for Congress in 1834 on a nullification platform. He then sold his interest in the Enquirer and in 1835 followed James W. Fannin, Jr., to Texas to collect historical data. By the time he reached Texas, Lamar's health and spirits began to mend and he decided to settle in the Mexican province. Characteristically, he immediately declared for Texas independence, helped build a fort at Velasco, contributed three poems to the Brazoria, Texas Republican, and hurried back to Georgia to settle his affairs.

At the news of the battle of the Alamo and the Goliad Massacre, Lamar rushed back to Velasco and inquired the way to the scene of battle. He joined the revolutionary army at Groce's Point as a private. When the Mexican and Texan forces faced each other at San Jacinto on April 20, 1836, Thomas J. Rusk and Walter Paye Lane were surrounded by the enemy. Lamar's quick action the next day saved their lives and brought him a salute from the Mexican lines. As the battle of San Jacinto was about to start, he was verbally commissioned a colonel and assigned to command the cavalry. Ten days after the battle, having become secretary of war in David G. Burnet's cabinet, he demanded that Antonio López de Santa Anna be executed as a murderer. A month later Lamar was major general and commander in chief of the Texas army, but the unruly Texas troops refused to accept him and he retired to civilian life.

In September 1836, in the first national election, Lamar was elected vice president, an office in which he had leisure to augment his historical collections and study Spanish. He spent most of the year 1837 in Georgia being feted as a hero and publicizing the new republic. Upon his return to Texas, he organized the Philosophical Society of Texas on December 5, 1837, and found that his campaign for the presidency of Texas was already under way, sponsored by opponents of President Sam Houston, who by law could not succeed himself. The other candidates, Peter W. Grayson and James Collinsworth, both committed suicide before election day, thus assuring Lamar's election by an almost unanimous vote. At his inauguration on December 10, 1838, Lamar declared the purposes of his administration to be promoting the wealth, talent, and enterprises of the country and laying the foundations of higher institutions for moral and mental culture. His term began with Texas in a precarious situation, however: only the United States had recognized her independence, she had no commercial treaties, Mexico was threatening reconquest, the Indians were menacing, the treasury was empty, and currency was depreciated. It was characteristic of Lamar to divert the thoughts of his constituents from the harassments of the moment toward laying the foundations of a great empire. Opposed to annexation, he thought Texas should remain a republic and ultimately expand to the Pacific Ocean. For Houston's conciliatory Indian policy, Lamar substituted one of sternness and force. The Cherokees were driven to Arkansas in 1839; in 1840 a campaign against the Comanches quieted the western Indians in the west at a cost of $2.5 million. Lamar sought peace with Mexico first through the good offices of the United States and Great Britain, then by efforts at direct negotiation. When it was clear that Mexico would not recognize Texas, he made a quasi-official alliance with the rebel government in Yucatán and leased to it the Texas Navy. He proposed a national bank, but instead of establishing the bank Congress authorized additional issues of paper money in the form of redbacks, which were greatly depreciated by the end of his administration. Receipts for his administration were $1,083,661; expenditures were $4,855,213. At Lamar's suggestion, the new capital city of Austin was built on the Indian frontier beside the Colorado River and occupied in October 1839. Another step in his plans for a greater Texas was the Texan Santa Fe expedition, undertaken without congressional approval in the last months of his administration. If it had succeeded, as Lamar had reason to believe it would, this botched venture might have solved many of the problems of Texas; its failure was proof to his enemies that he was "visionary." Lamar's proposal that the Congress establish a system of education endowed by public landsqv resulted in the act of January 26, 1839, which set aside land for public schools and two universities. Although it was decades before the school system was established, Lamar's advocacy of the program earned for him the nickname "Father of Texas Education." A dictum in one of his messages to Congress, "Cultivated mind is the guardian genius of democracy," was rendered by Dr. Edwin Fay into Disciplina Praesidium Civitatis, the motto of the University of Texas.

As the national election of 1841 approached, Lamar's popularity was at its lowest ebb, and Texas was at the verge of bankruptcy. The blame cannot be assessed against the president exclusively, however, for most of his policies were implemented by acts of Congress, and economic and political conditions in the United States and abroad blocked measures that might have temporarily stabilized the Texas currency. Forces that neither Lamar nor his enemies fully understood or controlled brought failure to his grandest projects. Smarting under criticism, he retired to his home near Richmond at the end of 1841 and busied himself with his plantation and with the collection of historical materials. After his daughter's death in 1843, he was plunged into melancholia and sought relief in travel. He wrote the poem "On the Death of My Daughter," which was later published in the Southern Literary Messenger. At Mobile in 1844 he fell in with a literary coterie that encouraged his interest in poetry. He received callers at the City Hall in New York and was given a courtesy seat in the United States Senate at Washington. Though he had formerly opposed annexation, he had been convinced that Texas statehood was necessary to protect slavery and prevent the state from becoming an English satellite; he therefore lobbied for annexation while in Washington. With the outbreak of the Mexican War, he joined Zachary Taylor's army at Matamoros as a lieutenant colonel and subsequently fought in the battle of Monterrey. Later he was captain of Texas Mounted Volunteers on the Rio Grande. He organized a municipal government at Laredo and in 1847 represented Nueces and San Patricio counties in the Second Texas Legislature. After 1848 Lamar traveled much and began writing biographical sketches for a proposed history of Texas. He denounced the Compromise of 1850, which convinced him that the interests of the South could be protected only by secession. In February 1851 in New Orleans he married Henrietta Maffitt. Their daughter, Loretto Evalina, was born at Macon, Georgia, in 1852. In 1857 Lamar was appointed United States minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica, a post he held for twenty months. His Verse Memorials appeared in September 1857. Two months after returning from his diplomatic mission, he died of a heart attack at his Richmond plantation on December 19, 1859. He was buried in the Masonic Cemetery at Richmond.

Lamar had great personal charm, impulsive generosity, and oratorical gifts. His powerful imagination caused him to project a program greater than he or Texas could actualize in three years. His friends were almost fanatically devoted to him; though his enemies declared him a better poet than politician, they never seriously questioned the purity of his motives or his integrity. Lamar County and the town of Lamar in Aransas County were named for him. In 1936 the Texas Centennial Commission placed statues of him in the Hall of State in Dallas and in the cemetery at Richmond. The commission also marked the site of his home near Richmond and the place of his residence as president in Austin, and built a miniature replica of his home on the square at Paris. At his death the Telegraph and Texas Register eulogized him as a "worthy man."

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Asa Kyrus Christian, Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (Austin: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1922). Herbert P. Gambrell, Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar: Troubadour and Crusader (Dallas: Southwest Press, 1934). Philip Graham, The Life and Poems of Mirabeau B. Lamar (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1938). Charles Adams Gulick, Jr., Harriet Smither, et al., eds., The Papers of Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (6 vols., Austin: Texas State Library, 1920-27; rpt., Austin: Pemberton Press, 1968). Sister M. Baptista Roach, "The Last "Crusade" of Mirabeau B. Lamar," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 45 (October 1941). Stanley E. Siegel, The Poet President of Texas: The Life of Mirabeau B. Lamar, President of the Republic of Texas (Austin: Jenkins, 1977).

Herbert Gambrell

The following account of Charles James McDonald is from The New Georgia Encyclopedia:

  Charles McDonald (1793-1860): Charles McDonald spent two terms as governor of Georgia during the tumultuous years following the economic panic of 1837. While in office, he helped to restore public confidence in the state's finances and government. After his four-year tenure McDonald became an advocate for states' rights. Charles James McDonald was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on July 9, 1793, to Mary Glas Burn and Charles McDonald. McDonald moved with his parents, who were Scottish immigrants, from South Carolina to Hancock County as an infant. He attended the Reverend Nathan Beman's academy at Mount Zion before entering South Carolina College, where he received his A.B. degree in 1816.After a year of studying law, McDonald was admitted to the Georgia bar, and he soon developed a lucrative legal practice and bought his own plantation in Bibb County. In 1822 he entered public service as the solicitor general for the Superior Court of the Flint Judicial Circuit in Henry County, and three years later he was sitting as a judge for the same court.In 1825 McDonald moved to Macon, the hometown of his wife, Anne Franklin. There the couple raised three daughters and two sons. In 1830, at the age of thirty-seven, he retired from the bench. His wife died in 1835, and four years later he married Elizabeth Roane Ruffin. Pushing southern industrialization while in Macon, McDonald invested heavily in railroad development, continued his law practice, and entered into land speculation. Also during this time he served a one-year term in the Georgia House of Representatives and two one-year terms in the state senate, and he was active in the Georgia militia as a brigadier general. In 1839 he ran as a Democratic Party candidate for governor. Beating the Whig Party candidate, Charles Dougherty, by less than 2,000 votes, McDonald began the first of his two terms that lasted until 1843. McDonald was the second governor to inhabit the Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville, then the state capital.At the time of his election, Georgia's economy was reeling from the panic of 1837. Cotton had dropped to four or five cents per pound, and commerce had come to a standstill. With nearly $1 million in state debt and an empty treasury, McDonald set himself the task of reviving the state economy, but he faced an uphill battle. The Democratic Party held only a small majority in the state legislature, and by 1840 the Whigs controlled the General Assembly. Still, McDonald convinced the state legislature to repeal county control of property taxes, which had been grossly mismanaged, and to direct those funds into state coffers. Then, vetoing a Whig bill that granted a 20 percent tax cut to property owners, he proposed a tax increase but was initially defeated. Undaunted, the governor ordered the state's treasurer not to pay the legislators' salaries until all other state expenses had been paid. Decrying McDonald's supposedly tyrannical order, the state legislature nonetheless approved a 25 percent general property tax increase. For the next eight years after leaving the governor's mansion, McDonald developed his business interests and focused his efforts on the establishment of a mill town in what was then Campbell County (present-day Douglas County). Built on Sweetwater Creek in 1848, his factory employed 60 workers and produced 750 yards of cloth per day by the time of the Civil War (1861-65). (In 1864 Union general William T. Sherman ordered the entire community burned, but the ruins of the factory are now a prominent tourist attraction in Sweetwater Creek State Park.) McDonald held a strict constructionist view of the U.S. Constitution, which led him to support a state's ability to secede from the Union and to reject the Compromise of 1850. In that vein, he left the Unionist Party and became the Southern Rights' Party candidate for governor in 1851, losing to Howell Cobb by a large margin. Withdrawing from politics, McDonald sold his Bibb County plantation and bought one in Cobb County. From 1855 to 1859 he served as a justice on the Supreme Court of Georgia. Because of poor health, he retired to his home in Marietta, known as Kennesaw Hall. At the time of his death on December 16, 1860, McDonald owned fifty-three slaves and held property worth $127,800.

Suggested Reading: James F. Cook, The Governors of Georgia: 1754-2004, 3d ed. (Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 2005).

Henry R. Jackson, Eulogy upon the Life and Character of the Honorable Charles J. McDonald (Atlanta: Franklin Printing House, 1861).

Robert E. Luckett Jr., University of Georgia

Published 8/10/2006

6. William Camp COX signed this document six years after the death of his father.

Note 5: In the federal census for Leon County, Leon Division, Centerville Post Office, Texas, taken on 12 September 1860, the following is recorded concerning the household of John Dennis STELL and Amanda Melvina HARVEY:

  Jno. D. Stell, aged 55, planter, $18,000 real estate, $49,925 personal estate, born in Georgia
Amanda M., aged 49, born in Georgia
Rophinas (recte: Raphineas), aged 17, student, born in Georgia
Isaac, aged 15, student, born in Georgia
Dennis, aged 12, born in Georgia
Henry, aged 10, born in Georgia
Leroy, aged 6, born in Georgia
John Cox, aged 24, merchant, personal estate $125, born in Georgia
T. R. Harkins, 42, laborer, born in Georgia

Note: The name of Raphineas ("Phineas") STELL is sometimes spelled as "Rophineas." At the outbreak of the War Between the States, he enlisted at the rank of Private in the Fifth Texas Cavalry Regiment, CSA (Fifth Mounted Volunteers), later designated as the Second Regiment of Sibley's Brigade. The Fourth Texas Regiment of Mounted Volunteers is often mentioned as the "First Regiment" of Sibley's Brigade.

Col. John Dennis STELL was the uncle of Thomas Rhodes HARKINS, a resident in his household and the son of Nancy Ann STELL and William HARKINS. About Nancy Ann STELL and William HARKINS, see Child 1: Nancy Ann STELL under G0494A: Robert Malone STELL in Antecedents and Descendants of Michael STELL (1683 - ABT 1706). About the family HARKINS, see Note 7 under G0491A: Charner Augustus ("Gus") SCAIFE, M. D. in Descendants of Robert Scaife I of Winton (ABT 1515 - 11 January 1591).

Note 6: In a memorandum written, in Zacatecas, Mexico, by Oliver Cox KENNEDY (born 14 February 1866), the son of Margaret Sara COX (21 December 1832 - 30 December 1911) and William Columbus KENNEDY (2 May 1827 - 16 January 1895) (see G0493B: Helen Marr HARVEY) and dated after 14 February 1906, it is said that the maternal grandfather of Amanda Melvina HARVEY and Helen Marr HARVEY was a "pioneer of Georgia who settled near the site of Macon" (Bibb County). Contrary to what is preserved by William Camp COX (note 4, above), the family NAPIER, which was settled in Georgia (Elbert and Putnam Counties) in the last quarter of the 18th Century, put down no roots in Alabama until later in the 19th Century. Oliver Cox KENNEDY repeats the tale of estrangement over matters of religion; but he claims, as is more likely, that Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. was a Methodist. Whatever may have been the philosophical inclinations of Thomas B. NAPIER, the family NAPIER - at least in Georgia - seems mostly to have been a tribe of conventional Methodists.

Note 7: Benjamin Franklin CLARK, M. D., the husband of Emily Cunningham STELL, was the son of Jacob Lynch CLARK (1798 - 21 February 1858) and Elizabeth JONES.

Note 8: Mildred Jayne ("Jennie") HAYNES, the wife of LeRoy N(apier?) STELL, was the tenth child of Samuel Grant HAYNES (10 October 1845, Russell County, Alabama - 1 November 1899, Deleon, Comanche County, Texas) and Mary Caroline CASEY (23 February 1844, Wayne County, Tennessee - 15 December 1914, Deleon, Comanche County, Texas), who were married 13 September 1864 in Williamson County, Texas. Mildred Jayne ("Jennie") HAYNES was first married to Albert Johnson MILLER (14 January 1861, Alabama - 29 December 1887, Comanche County, Texas), 3 January 1883, Bell County, Texas; and she was second married to Tom C. PATTERSON (ABT 1857, Alabama - ABT 1899, Texas), 7 May 1890, Bell County, Texas. By her marriage to LeRoy N. STELL, she engendered John Dennis STELL. It is in the tax records of 1903 for Comanche County that Mildred Jayne ("Jennie") HAYNES can be observed changing her surname from PATTERSON to STELL.

The last reported photograph of LeRoy N(apier?) STELL was taken in 1908. In the photograph, he is shown with Alice SHRIMER, who became his second wife.

____________________________
____________________________
 

G0493B: Helen Marr HARVEY
Birth: July 1811, Butte County, Georgia
Death: March 1881, Leon County, Texas
Interment: under the same monument as Mary ["Molly"] COX and James F. KENNEDY, at Jackson Cemetery, Leon County, Texas
Father: Rev. Isaac HARVEY (Sr.) (1786, Wilkes County, Georgia - 16 September 1838, Wetumpka, Autauga [now Elmore] County, Alabama)
Mother: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER (23 January 1791, Elbert County, Georgia - AFT 17 February 1832) [See G0494A: Sarah ("Sally") Garland NAPIER, in Antecedents and Descendants of Patrick Napier, Chirurgeon (ABT 1634 - AFT 26 February 1668 and BEF 12 April 1669).]

Marriage: 29 July 1830, Macon, Henry County, Georgia, by Rev. James Gamble
Spouse: Oliver Wiley COX, Colonel (11 June 1802, Lincoln County, North Carolina - October 1852, Henry County, Georgia). [See G0493B: Oliver Wiley COX, in Descendants of John Cox (1 November 1727 - ABT 1804/05)]

Child 1: Thomas Nathan COX (14 May 1831, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - 3 May 1858, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota) [M]

Child 2: Margaret Sara COX (21 December 1832, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - 30 December 1911, <Clay County>, Alabama) [F]: m. William Columbus KENNEDY (2 May 1827, Randolph County, Alabama - 16 January 1895, <Clay County>, Alabama)

Child 3: Leonora COX (18 December 1834, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - August 1851, Fulton County, Georgia: interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia) [F]

Child 4: Elisha Carson COX (9 December 1836, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - AFT 9 June 1880, Garden Valley, Smith County, Texas) [M]: m. Mary Isabelle FINLEY (or FINDLAY) (1842, Macon, Bibb County, Georgia - August 1906), 5 February 1861, Georgia

Child 5: Martha ("Mattie") Varner COX (6 March 1838, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - AFT 7 June 1880, <Wood County>, Texas) [F]: m. James D. ("Dorse") CAMPBELL (1834, Georgia - AFT 7 June 1880, <Wood County>, Texas), 15 August 1865, Henry County, Georgia

Child 6: Mary ("Molly") COX (December 1838, McDonough, Henry County, Georgia - December 1882, Leon County, Texas: interment at Jackson Cemetery, Leon County, Texas) [F]: m. James F. KENNEDY (1828, Franklin County, Georgia - December 1885, Leon County, Texas: interment at Jackson Cemetery, Leon County, Texas)

Child 7: Isaac Harvey COX (20 May 1843, Randolph County, Alabama - 16 May 1908, Leon County, Texas: interment at Gum Springs Cemetery, Flynn, Leon County, Texas) [M]: m. Sarah Elizabeth ("Bettie") BRADY (7 June 1840, Tennessee - 4 November 1918, Leon County, Texas: interment at Gum Springs Cemetery, Flynn, Leon County, Texas), 1866, Leon County, Texas

Child 8: Tabitha M. COX (19 February 1845, Randolph County, Alabama - December 1852, Fulton County, Georgia: interment at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia)

Note 1: Helen Marr HARVEY was the identical twin of Amanda Melvina HARVEY (G0493A), who married Samuel Waller COX, the brother of Oliver Wiley COX.

Of the marriage of Oliver Wiley COX and Helen Marr HARVEY, the Weekly Telegraph (Macon, Georgia) reported, on Saturday, 31 July 1830, as follows:

  On the 29th of July, by the Rev. James Gamble, O. W. COX, formerly of Charleston, S. C., now merchant of McDonough, Henry County, to the amiable Miss Helen M. HARVEY, daughter of Isaac HARVEY, of Bibb County.

Georgia Marriages to 1850 shows the marriage, in Henry County, of Pleas W. COX and Helen M. HARVEY on 29 July 1830. There was a Pleasant W. COX flourishing in the area of Henry County, Georgia at this time; and it is possible that "Pleasant" was the nickname of Oliver Wiley COX.

Note 2: Oliver Wiley COX was, in Georgia, the State Senator for Henry County in 1840. He arrived in Henry County, Georgia, early in the 1830s and resided, near McDonough, at his plantation called "White Chimneys." It is likely that it was Oliver Wiley COX who introduced Colonel John Dennis STELL (27 October 1804, Hancock County, Georgia - 28 October 1862, Tyler, Smith County, Texas, Confederate States of America) to the widow of Samuel Waller COX and that it was STELL who began the migration to Smith and Leon counties, Texas, in which so many of the children of these two brothers COX participated.

The following paragraph appears in "History of McDonough," which was published by Scip Speer in 1921 on the occasion of the centenary of Henry County. The words, however, are those of Elizabeth C. Nolan as they appeared, in 1908, in the United Daughters of the Confederacy "edition of the Weekly:"

  "Oliver W. Cox came to Henry County in the early thirties and settled in McDonough where he engaged in the mercantile business in the building recently occupied by Mr. Cam Turner. At one time he owned the plantation known as "White Chimneys". He married Miss Harvey, of McDonough. In 1840 he was elected senator. His brother, John M. Cox, came to McDonough in 1838. He also went into the mercantile business and for a number of years was proprietor of the hotel which stood on the southeast corner of the square. While living here he owned the plantation now known as the Dailey place."

Miss Nolan also recorded that Mattie COX, in Henry County, was a school teacher.

In an anonymous account of the history of Henry County (http://www.nwittler.com/HenryCounty/history.html), the following paragraph occurs:

  "Subtle changes began to occur in McDonough and Henry County in the 1830s, as new territories began to open up to the west, attracting the pioneer spirit in many and gold was discovered in North Georgia and Alabama, drawing others to those places of seemingly great promise. Prosperous merchants such as Amasa Spencer, William L. Crayton, and Gilbert S. Matthews heard the siren call and moved on. Oliver W. Cox and Thomas C. Russell, one of the Justices who had served in the organization of McDonough, sought their destinies in Alabama. It was an adventurous and fast-moving era and the county lost many worthy citizens to the changes that were taking place."

On Saturday, 14 January 1832, the Georgia Messenger reported, from the executive department of the State of Georgia, that Gov. Wilson Lumpkin had named Oliver W. COX, of Henry County, as one of his aides.

  United States Census
Henry County, Georgia
District 702
1840

O. W. COX
1 male, aged under 5
1 male, aged 5 and under 10
2 males, aged 20 and under 30
1 female, aged under 5
2 females, aged 5 and under 10
1 female, aged 15 and under 20
2 females, aged 20 and under 30

By 1843, Oliver Wiley COX and his family were residing in Randolph County, Alabama where - in what seems to indicate a reversal of his fortunes - he was employed as a blacksmith.

  United States Census
Randolph County, Alabama
Precinct 5
13 November 1850

Oliver W. COX, male, aged 48, blacksmith, born in North Carolina
Helen Mar[r] COX, female, aged 37, born in Georgia
Thomas N. COX, male, aged 19, born in Georgia
Leonora COX, female, aged 16, born in Georgia
Elisha C. COX, male, aged 13, born in Georgia
Mary COX, female, aged 12, born in Georgia
Martha COX, female, aged 10, born in Georgia
Isaac COX, male, aged 8, born in Alabama
Tabitha COX, female, aged 4, born in Alabama

Note 3: After the death of Oliver Wiley COX, his widow resided with her son, Elisha Carson COX, until she went to Texas to live with Isaac Harvey COX.

Note 4: Thomas Nathan COX was, by profession, an attorney in Atlanta, Georgia. He had served in the Mexican War under General Zachary Taylor and, while doing so, contracted tuberculosis. He is said to have mastered four languages and to have writen a tragicomedy called "The Lombard King." The play was performed in a number of cities, with its author in the leading role, and is said to have been a success. Thomas Nathan COX acquired land in the vicinity of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and moved to that locale, presumably for his health. He died, in Minneapolis, at the age of 26.

Note 5: Elisha Carson COX moved to Smith County, Texas, about 1870.

  United States Census
Garden Valley, Smith County, Texas
Mt. Sylvan Post Office
6 August 1870

Elisha COX, male, aged 33, farmer, born in Georgia
Mary COX, female, aged 28, keeping house, born in Georgia
Robert COX, male, aged 8, born in Georgia
Mary COX, female, aged 5, born in Georgia
Margaret COX, female, aged 5/12, born in Texas
Helen COX [= Helen Marr HARVEY], female, aged 55, born in Georgia
====================

United States Census
Justice Precinct No. 5, Smith County, Texas
9 June 1880

E. Carson COX, male, aged 43, farmer, born in Georgia
Mary I. COX, female, aged 38, wife, keeping house, born in Georgia
R. Finley COX, male, aged 18, son, laborer on farm, born in Georgia
Nolly COX, female, aged 13, daughter, at home, born in Georgia
Mag[g]ie COX, female, aged 10, daughter, in school, born in Texas
Arthur COX, male, aged 7, son, at home, born in Texas
Nathan COX, male, aged 5, at home, born in Texas

Note 6: The identity of Mary ("Molly") COX's husband has not been previously remarked by investigators of this line. According to the written testimony of John Calhoun COX, she had married the brother of William Columbus KENNEDY, the husband of Margaret Sara COX. And, according to a letter from Margaret COX, born in Garden Valley, Texas, to Frances Pyron DANCE, dated 2 February 1940, Helen Marr COX (née HARVEY) died, in 1877 (sic), at the home of "Molly," "Mrs. Jim Kennedy," in Leon County, Texas.

Helen Marr COX (née HARVEY) is buried in Jackson Cemetery, Leon County, Texas, under the same monument as Mary ["Molly"] COX and James F. KENNEDY. For her, the inscription reads "Helen C. Cox, wife of Col. O. W. Cox, born in Butte County, Georgia, July, 1813 - died March 1881." Because, in the United States Census for 1860, Amanda Melvina HARVEY, the twin sister of Helen Marr HARVEY, reported her age as 49, the year of birth as 1811 is here provisionally accepted for Helen Marr HARVEY.

The inscription, in the Jackson Cemetery, for James F. KENNEDY gives his place of birth as Franklin County, Georgia; and that for Mary ["Molly"] COX gives her place of birth as Henry County, Georgia.

The Jackson Cemetery is located east of Jewett, in Leon County, Texas. From Jewett, take US 79 approximately four miles, then left on a dirt road approximately 1.5 miles, then left on another dirt road for one mile. The cemetery is located 1500 feet east of what is known as Taylor Lake.

Frances Pyron DANCE, who was the principal genealogist of the Georgia branch of this line of Coxes and who documented the parentage and offspring of William Columbus KENNEDY, stated that she had no record of Mary COX's marriage. William Columbus KENNEDY and James F. KENNEDY were the sons of Joseph Marcus KENNEDY who emigrated from Henry County, Georgia to Randolph County, Alabama, in 1820. The elder KENNEDY lived among the Creek Indians until their expulsion in 1836.

Note 7: Isaac Harvey COX, who was known as "Dick" or "Harvey," moved to Leon County, Texas and there married Bettie BRADY. There is reason to believe that he was her second marriage and that "Brady" was not her maiden name. There is also reason to believe that Rev. Isaac HARVEY, Sr. the maternal grandfather of Isaac Harvey COX, was similarly called "Dick". This has misled investigators into thinking that there was a "Richard" HARVEY who was the father of Helen Marr HARVEY and Amanda Melvina HARVEY. Isaac HARVEY is said to have been a backwoods Presbyterian (or Methodist) revivalist. From what is known of him, he is likely to have been a Temperance preacher.

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Many exceedingly valuable contributions have been made to this web page by Mr. John B. Windham, much based on the research - which was conducted over a period of fifty years - by Ralph Ferguson Harvey (2 June 1919, Alabama - 25 September 1989, Dallas County, Texas). Some of Ralph Ferguson Harvey's voluminous work was compiled by William and Irma Lampton and published as Partial History of the Harvey Family (1992). What is expressed on this web page is based, therefore, on the premiss that the account which is given of the Harveys of Virginia and Georgia by John Bennett Boddie and Mrs. John Bennett Boddie in Historical Southern Families, vol. 1 (1957) is rather flawed. In contrast, Mr. John B. Windham is a most exacting scholar.

Important contribution to this web page has also been made by Mr. Dennis Kowallek.

Persons contributing to this web page are not responsible for the use which its author has made of their information or points of view. All such errors as may be found herein are entirely the fault of the author of this web page.

   

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This Web site was created 11 November 1998.